Top 22 Slang For Commence – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to starting something new or kicking off a project, having the right slang at your fingertips can make all the difference. Join us as we uncover the coolest and most current slang terms for “commence” that will have you sounding like a pro in no time. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to spice up your vocabulary, this list is sure to have something that catches your eye. So, what are you waiting for? Let’s get this show on the road and dive into the world of slang for “commence!”

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1. Kick off

This slang term is often used to describe the start of an event, activity, or process. It can be used in various contexts.

  • For example, “Let’s kick off the party with some music and dancing!”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “The game is about to kick off, and the crowd is getting excited.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to kick off this new project with a team meeting to discuss the goals and timeline.”

2. Get the ball rolling

This phrase is often used to describe taking the first step to begin something or to get things started.

  • For instance, “Let’s get the ball rolling on planning the company picnic.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I’ll start by presenting the agenda to get the ball rolling.”
  • A team leader might encourage their members by saying, “We need everyone’s input to get the ball rolling and make progress on this project.”

3. Jump-start

This slang term is often used to describe giving something a sudden boost or starting it with a burst of energy.

  • For example, “Let’s jump-start the day with a strong cup of coffee.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to jump-start sales by offering a limited-time promotion.”
  • A fitness instructor might say, “Jump-start your workout with some high-intensity exercises to get your heart rate up.”

4. Set in motion

This phrase is often used to describe the act of starting something or putting it into action.

  • For instance, “The CEO’s decision set in motion a series of changes within the company.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The new policy is expected to set in motion a wave of reforms.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The first step in learning a new subject is to set your curiosity in motion by asking questions.”

5. Commence proceedings

This phrase is often used in legal or formal contexts to indicate the beginning of a proceeding or event.

  • For example, “The judge will now commence proceedings by calling the court to order.”
  • In a graduation ceremony, the speaker might say, “Ladies and gentlemen, please rise as we commence the commencement proceedings.”
  • A conference organizer might announce, “We will now commence the keynote address and begin the conference proceedings.”

6. Fire up

To begin something with energy and excitement.

  • For example, “Let’s fire up the grill and start cooking!”
  • A coach might say, “Fire up the team and get ready for the game!”
  • When starting a project, someone might say, “I’m ready to fire up my creativity and get to work!”

7. Launch into

To start something with a lot of energy and enthusiasm.

  • For instance, “She launched into her presentation with confidence and passion.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Let’s not waste any more time. Let’s launch into the discussion!”
  • A teacher might encourage students by saying, “Now, let’s launch into our next lesson and explore a new topic!”

8. Open the door to

To start something that allows for new possibilities or opportunities.

  • For example, “Learning a new language can open the door to exciting travel experiences.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “This opportunity could open the door to a successful career.”
  • A teacher might tell students, “Education is the key that opens the door to a brighter future.”

9. Take the first step

To start by doing the initial action or making the initial move.

  • For instance, “If you want to achieve your goals, you need to take the first step.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might say, “Taking the first step is often the hardest, but it’s necessary for progress.”
  • A mentor might advise, “Don’t be afraid to take the first step towards your dreams. You never know what opportunities await!”

10. Break the ice

To initiate a conversation or interaction in order to make people feel more comfortable.

  • For example, “He told a joke to break the ice at the party.”
  • In a networking event, someone might say, “Let’s break the ice and introduce ourselves to new people.”
  • A shy person might ask for help to break the ice by saying, “Can you give me some tips on how to start a conversation with strangers?”

11. Get underway

This phrase means to begin or start something, often with a sense of movement or progress. It can be used in various contexts.

  • For example, “Let’s get underway with our project and start brainstorming ideas.”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “We need to get underway and start the mission.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “It’s time to get underway and start practicing for the upcoming game.”

12. Begin the journey

This phrase means to start or initiate a journey or process. It is often used metaphorically to refer to starting something new or embarking on a new endeavor.

  • For instance, “Now that you’ve graduated, it’s time to begin the journey of finding a job.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Don’t be afraid to begin the journey of pursuing your dreams.”
  • Someone starting a new business might say, “I’m excited to begin the journey of entrepreneurship.”

13. Start the ball rolling

This phrase means to initiate or start an action or process, often with the intention of getting others involved or moving things forward.

  • For example, “Let’s start the ball rolling by scheduling a meeting to discuss our plans.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “I’ll start the ball rolling by doing some research and gathering information.”
  • A team leader might encourage their team by saying, “We need someone to start the ball rolling and take the first step.”

14. Initiate proceedings

This phrase refers to starting or initiating legal proceedings or actions. It is often used in a legal or formal context.

  • For instance, “The plaintiff’s attorney will initiate proceedings by filing a lawsuit.”
  • In a court case, a judge might say, “The court will initiate proceedings and schedule a hearing.”
  • A lawyer might advise their client, “We need to initiate proceedings in order to protect your rights.”

15. Embark on

This phrase means to start or begin a new journey or venture. It implies a sense of excitement or anticipation for what lies ahead.

  • For example, “I’m ready to embark on a new chapter of my life and start college.”
  • A traveler might say, “I can’t wait to embark on my backpacking trip through Europe.”
  • Someone starting a new job might say, “I’m excited to embark on this new career opportunity.”

16. Commence the process

This phrase means to begin or initiate a process or activity. It is often used in a formal or professional context.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “Let’s commence the process of developing a new marketing campaign.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might suggest, “We should commence the process of hiring a new employee.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Please commence the process of completing your assignments.”

17. Kickstart

To kickstart something means to give it a boost or to initiate it. It implies starting with enthusiasm or energy.

  • For instance, a motivational speaker might say, “It’s time to kickstart your dreams and pursue your passions.”
  • In a fitness class, the instructor might say, “Let’s kickstart our workout with some high-intensity exercises.”
  • A business owner might decide to “kickstart” a new marketing campaign to generate more sales.
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18. Set the wheels in motion

This phrase means to initiate or begin a process or plan. It suggests taking the necessary steps to get things started.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “Let’s set the wheels in motion for the new product launch.”
  • In a discussion about organizing an event, someone might suggest, “We need to set the wheels in motion by booking the venue and sending out invitations.”
  • A team leader might say, “It’s time to set the wheels in motion and start working towards our goals.”

19. Open up

To open up means to start or begin something. It can be used in various contexts, both formal and informal.

  • For instance, a speaker at a conference might say, “Let’s open up the discussion on the future of technology.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “We should open up the floor for questions and feedback.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Let’s open up our textbooks and begin the lesson.”

20. Get things going

This phrase means to start or initiate a process or activity. It implies taking action to get things started.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Let’s get things going by assigning tasks to each team member.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might suggest, “Let’s get things going with some music and dancing.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to get things going by setting deadlines and allocating resources.”

21. Dive in

This phrase is used to describe starting something with enthusiasm and energy. It implies a sense of eagerness and willingness to fully engage in an activity or task.

  • For example, before starting a meal, someone might say, “Let’s dive in!”
  • In a work setting, a team leader might encourage their colleagues by saying, “Let’s dive in and get this project started.”
  • When starting a new hobby, a person might say, “I can’t wait to dive in and learn everything about it!”

22. Start off

This phrase is a simple and straightforward way to describe the act of beginning something. It suggests starting from the very beginning or the initial stage of a process or activity.

  • For instance, when giving instructions, someone might say, “To start off, gather all the necessary ingredients.”
  • In a conversation about a new job, a person might mention, “I’m excited to start off on the right foot and make a good impression.”
  • When beginning a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let’s start off with some background information.”