Top 36 Slang For Commentary – Meaning & Usage

Whether you’re a sports enthusiast, a movie buff, or just love to share your thoughts, having the right slang for commentary can take your social media game to the next level.

Join us as we break down the coolest and most relevant terms for providing commentary in any situation. Stay ahead of the curve and upgrade your commentary game with our curated list of trendy phrases and expressions.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Running commentary

This refers to a continuous commentary or narration of an ongoing event, usually provided in real-time. It can be found in sports broadcasts, live streams, or even during a live event.

  • For example, during a soccer match, the commentator might provide a running commentary of the game, describing the action as it happens.
  • In a live stream of a gaming tournament, the streamer might offer a running commentary of their gameplay, explaining their strategy and decisions.
  • During a political debate, a news anchor might provide a running commentary, analyzing the arguments and offering insights.

2. Sideline reporting

This refers to reporting or commentary that is done from the sidelines or the field, often in sports. Sideline reporters provide live updates, interviews, and analysis during a game or event.

  • For instance, during a football game, a sideline reporter might interview the coach or players on the sidelines and provide updates on injuries or strategy changes.
  • In a tennis match, a sideline reporter might provide commentary on the players’ performance and tactics.
  • During a live concert, a sideline reporter might interview the artists backstage and provide behind-the-scenes commentary.

3. Voiceover

This refers to a commentary or narration that is provided by a voice actor or narrator, usually in a recorded format. Voiceovers are often used in documentaries, commercials, or video games.

  • For example, in a nature documentary, a voiceover might provide commentary on the behavior of animals or the characteristics of different ecosystems.
  • In a commercial, a voiceover might narrate the product’s features and benefits.
  • In a video game, a voiceover might provide commentary on the game’s storyline and guide the player through the gameplay.

4. Critique

This refers to a commentary or analysis that provides an evaluation or assessment of something, such as a performance, artwork, or book. Critics often offer their opinions and insights on the strengths and weaknesses of the subject.

  • For instance, a film critic might write a critique of a newly released movie, discussing the acting, plot, and overall quality.
  • In an art exhibition, a critic might offer a critique of the artworks, analyzing their composition, technique, and message.
  • A music critic might write a critique of a concert, discussing the musicians’ performances and the audience’s reaction.

5. Recap

This refers to a commentary or summary that provides a brief overview or synopsis of an event or situation. Recaps are often used in sports broadcasts, TV shows, or news segments.

  • For example, after a basketball game, the commentators might provide a recap of the key plays, scores, and highlights.
  • In a TV show, a host might provide a recap of the previous episode, reminding viewers of important plot points.
  • During a news segment, a reporter might provide a recap of a recent event, summarizing the key details and developments.

6. Breakdown

A breakdown is a detailed explanation or analysis of a topic or situation. It involves breaking down complex information into simpler terms to help the audience understand.

  • For example, a sports commentator might provide a breakdown of a player’s performance in a game.
  • In a film review, a critic might give a breakdown of the plot and analyze the themes and symbolism.
  • A news anchor might provide a breakdown of a current event, explaining the background and implications.

7. Insightful commentary

Insightful commentary refers to thoughtful and perceptive analysis or observations about a particular subject. It provides unique perspectives and deep understanding.

  • For instance, a political analyst might provide insightful commentary on the current political climate.
  • A film critic might offer insightful commentary on the symbolism and social commentary in a movie.
  • During a sports game, a commentator might provide insightful commentary on the strategies and tactics used by the teams.

8. Colorful commentary

Colorful commentary refers to vibrant and expressive analysis or commentary that adds personality and flair to the discussion.

  • For example, a sports commentator might provide colorful commentary by using vivid language and metaphors to describe the action.
  • In a fashion review, a critic might offer colorful commentary on the bold choices made by a designer.
  • A music critic might provide colorful commentary on a musician’s unique style and stage presence.

9. In-depth analysis

In-depth analysis involves a thorough examination and exploration of a topic or issue. It goes beyond surface-level understanding and delves into the complexities and nuances.

  • For instance, a financial analyst might provide an in-depth analysis of a company’s performance and future prospects.
  • In a book review, a critic might offer an in-depth analysis of the themes, characters, and writing style.
  • A technology expert might provide an in-depth analysis of the latest smartphone’s features and specifications.
See also  Top 74 Slang For Set-Up – Meaning & Usage

10. Roundtable discussion

A roundtable discussion is a group discussion or conversation involving multiple participants who share their thoughts and opinions on a specific topic.

  • For example, a news panel might engage in a roundtable discussion on current events and offer different perspectives.
  • In a talk show, guests might participate in a roundtable discussion on a trending topic.
  • A podcast might feature a roundtable discussion with experts in a particular field, sharing their insights and experiences.

11. Spill the tea

This phrase is often used to describe sharing juicy or scandalous information. It can also refer to revealing hidden details or exposing the truth.

  • For example, “Did you hear? Sarah spilled the tea about what really happened at the party.”
  • A friend might say, “Come on, spill the tea! I want to know all the details.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity scandal, someone might comment, “I can’t wait for them to spill the tea on this situation.”

12. Give the 411

This phrase is derived from the telephone area code for information in the United States. It is used to ask for or provide essential information or details on a particular topic.

  • For instance, “Can you give me the 411 on the new restaurant in town?”
  • Someone might ask, “Hey, what’s the 411 on that upcoming event?”
  • In a conversation about a movie, a person might say, “I can give you the 411 on the plot without spoiling anything.”

13. Throw shade

This slang phrase refers to making subtle or indirect insults or criticisms towards someone. It can involve sarcastic remarks, backhanded compliments, or snide comments.

  • For example, “She always throws shade at her ex-boyfriend when they’re in the same room.”
  • During a heated argument, someone might say, “Stop throwing shade and just say what you really mean.”
  • In a celebrity feud, one person might accuse the other of constantly throwing shade.

14. Drop knowledge

This phrase is used to describe sharing valuable or insightful information with others. It is often used to acknowledge someone’s expertise or to encourage them to share their knowledge.

  • For instance, “John always drops knowledge about history whenever we have discussions.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “I’m going to drop some knowledge on you today, so pay attention.”
  • In a conversation about a complex topic, someone might say, “I need you to drop some knowledge on me because I’m confused.”

15. Chime in

This phrase is used to invite someone to join a conversation or to encourage them to share their opinion on a particular topic. It implies that their input is valuable and welcomed.

  • For example, “Feel free to chime in if you have any thoughts or ideas.”
  • During a group discussion, someone might say, “We haven’t heard from you yet, why don’t you chime in?”
  • In an online forum, a user might post, “I’d love for everyone to chime in on this topic and share their perspectives.”

16. Put in your two cents

This phrase is used to encourage someone to express their thoughts or give their input on a particular topic. It implies that their opinion is valued, even if it may not be worth much.

  • For example, during a group discussion, someone might say, “Feel free to put in your two cents if you have any ideas.”
  • In a comment section, a user might write, “I just wanted to put in my two cents and say that I completely disagree with the author.”
  • During a meeting, a coworker might add, “Before we wrap up, I’d like to put in my two cents on the matter.”

17. Give the lowdown

This phrase means to give someone all the necessary information or provide a comprehensive explanation about a particular topic or situation. It is often used when someone wants to be fully informed or briefed.

  • For instance, a friend might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on what happened at the party last night?”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “Here’s the lowdown on the latest government scandal.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Before we start the project, let me give you the lowdown on the requirements.”

18. Talk smack

This slang phrase means to speak negatively or disrespectfully about someone or something. It often involves making derogatory comments or trash-talking.

  • For example, during a sports game, a fan might say, “Our team is going to win, and I can’t wait to talk smack to the opposing fans.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might yell, “Don’t you dare talk smack about my family!”
  • A gossip might say, “I overheard Sarah talking smack about you behind your back.”

19. Dish the dirt

To “dish the dirt” means to share juicy or scandalous information, often about someone’s personal life. It can involve revealing secrets or spreading gossip.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I need to dish the dirt on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a tabloid magazine, a headline might read, “Celebrities dish the dirt on their exes.”
  • A reality TV show host might ask a contestant, “Are you ready to dish the dirt on your fellow competitors?”

20. Call it like you see it

This phrase means to express an opinion or make a judgment based on one’s own observations or perception, without sugarcoating or holding back. It implies speaking truthfully and directly.

  • For example, during a debate, someone might say, “I’m just going to call it like I see it: your argument doesn’t make sense.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might say, “I appreciate your work, but I have to call it like I see it: you need to improve your time management.”
  • A friend might offer advice by saying, “I’ll call it like I see it: you’re making a mistake by staying in that toxic relationship.”

21. Lay it on thick

To exaggerate or overstate something, often in a dramatic or excessive manner.

  • For example, a movie critic might say, “The director really laid it on thick with the emotional scenes.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s storytelling skills, a person might comment, “He tends to lay it on thick with his descriptions.”
  • A friend might joke, “Don’t lay it on too thick when you’re trying to convince me to go to that party.”

22. Wax poetic

To speak or write in a poetic, eloquent, or exaggeratedly enthusiastic manner.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Whenever he talks about his favorite band, he tends to wax poetic.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me take a moment to wax poetic about the beauty of nature.”
  • A friend might tease, “You always wax poetic when you talk about your significant other.”

23. Keep it real

To be honest, genuine, and authentic in one’s words or actions.

  • For example, a person might say, “I appreciate that he always keeps it real and doesn’t sugarcoat things.”
  • During a discussion about relationships, someone might advise, “It’s important to keep it real and communicate openly with your partner.”
  • A friend might comment, “I trust her because she always keeps it real and never pretends to be someone she’s not.”

24. Shoot from the hip

To speak or act impulsively or without careful consideration.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He tends to shoot from the hip and say things without considering the consequences.”
  • During a debate, someone might accuse their opponent of “shooting from the hip” when they make unsupported claims.
  • A friend might advise, “Think before you speak. It’s better to gather your thoughts than to shoot from the hip.”

25. Tell it like it is

To speak in a straightforward, honest, and direct manner without sugarcoating or holding back.

  • For example, a person might say, “I appreciate her because she always tells it like it is.”
  • During a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let’s be open and tell it like it is, even if it’s uncomfortable.”
  • A friend might comment, “You can always count on him to tell it like it is, no matter what.”

26. Review

A review is a critical assessment or examination of something, such as a book, movie, or product. It often includes an opinion or judgment about the quality or value of the subject being reviewed.

  • For example, “I just read a review of that new restaurant, and it sounds amazing!”
  • A movie critic might write, “In my review of the film, I praised the performances but criticized the plot.”
  • A user might comment on a product review, saying, “Thanks for the detailed review. It helped me make my decision.”

27. Commentary

Commentary refers to a detailed explanation or interpretation of something, typically in the form of comments or remarks. It often provides additional insight or perspective on a particular topic or event.

  • For instance, during a sports game, a commentator might provide live commentary on the action.
  • A political analyst might offer commentary on a current event, providing their perspective and analysis.
  • A user might comment on a news article, saying, “I appreciate the author’s commentary on this issue.”

28. Observations

Observations are the act of noticing or perceiving something, often with a focus on providing information or insight based on what is observed.

  • For example, “I made some interesting observations during my trip to the museum.”
  • A scientist might present their observations in a research paper, saying, “Based on our observations, we concluded that the hypothesis was correct.”
  • A user might comment on a social media post, sharing their observations on a topic, saying, “I’ve noticed the same thing. It’s an interesting trend.”

29. Remarks

Remarks are brief comments or statements made in response to something, often expressing an opinion, reaction, or thought.

  • For instance, during a meeting, someone might make remarks about a particular topic being discussed.
  • A speaker might end their presentation with closing remarks, summarizing their main points.
  • A user might comment on a blog post, sharing their remarks on the content, saying, “Great article! I agree with your remarks on the importance of communication.”

30. Thoughts

Thoughts refer to one’s ideas, opinions, or beliefs on a particular subject. It often implies a personal reflection or contemplation.

  • For example, “I have some thoughts on the current state of the economy.”
  • A writer might share their thoughts in a blog post, expressing their perspective on a topic.
  • A user might comment on a social media post, sharing their thoughts on an issue, saying, “These are my thoughts on the matter. What do you think?”

31. Opinions

Opinions are personal viewpoints or beliefs on a particular subject. In the context of commentary, opinions are often expressed to provide insight or perspective.

  • For example, a commentator might say, “In my opinion, this movie is a masterpiece.”
  • During a political debate, someone might share their opinion by saying, “I believe this policy will have a positive impact on the economy.”
  • A sports commentator might offer their opinion on a player’s performance by saying, “In my opinion, she is the best goalkeeper in the league.”

32. Reactions

Reactions refer to the responses or feedback that people have to a particular event, situation, or piece of content. In commentary, reactions are often used to gauge public sentiment or to analyze the impact of something.

  • For instance, a news commentator might discuss the public’s reactions to a controversial decision by saying, “The public’s reactions have been overwhelmingly negative.”
  • During a live sports match, a commentator might say, “Let’s see how the crowd’s reactions influence the players.”
  • A movie critic might analyze the audience’s reactions to a film by saying, “The film received mixed reactions from viewers.”

33. Verdict

A verdict is a final judgment or decision reached after careful consideration or analysis. In commentary, a verdict is often used to summarize or evaluate the overall outcome or impact of something.

  • For example, a legal commentator might say, “The verdict was in favor of the defendant.”
  • In a review of a new restaurant, a food critic might give their verdict by saying, “My verdict is that the food was delicious, but the service was lacking.”
  • A technology commentator might offer their verdict on a new smartphone by saying, “In my verdict, this phone offers great value for the price.”

34. Musings

Musings refer to thoughts or reflections on a particular subject. In commentary, musings are often used to share personal insights or to explore different perspectives.

  • For instance, a political commentator might share their musings on the future of democracy by saying, “These are my musings on the challenges we face.”
  • During a philosophical discussion, someone might offer their musings on the meaning of life by saying, “These are just my personal musings, but I believe life is about finding happiness.”
  • A commentator on social issues might share their musings on the impact of technology by saying, “These musings are meant to provoke thought and discussion.”

35. Takeaways

Takeaways are the key points or lessons learned from a particular event, experience, or piece of content. In commentary, takeaways are often used to summarize the main ideas or to provide actionable insights.

  • For example, a business commentator might say, “Here are the key takeaways from the CEO’s speech.”
  • In a sports analysis, a commentator might discuss the takeaways from a team’s performance by saying, “The main takeaway is that the defense needs improvement.”
  • A book reviewer might highlight the takeaways from a novel by saying, “The main takeaway from this book is the importance of forgiveness.”

36. Weigh in

This phrase is often used to invite someone to share their thoughts or perspective on a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, during a debate, a moderator might say, “Now let’s hear from our panelists. Please weigh in on this question.”
  • In a sports commentary, the commentator might say, “Let’s see what the experts have to weigh in on this controversial call.”
  • During a team meeting, a manager might ask, “Does anyone else want to weigh in before we make a decision?”