Top 37 Slang For Complete – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing that something is finished, complete, or done, there are a plethora of slang terms that have emerged. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or simply looking to expand your vocabulary, this listicle is here to help you navigate the ever-evolving landscape of slang for complete. From “finna” to “finito,” we’ve got you covered with the trendiest and most popular ways to say “it’s done.” So, sit back, relax, and get ready to impress your friends with your newfound slang knowledge!

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1. Done and dusted

This phrase is used to indicate that a task or activity has been successfully completed or finished. It emphasizes that everything is finished and there is nothing more to do.

  • For example, after completing a project, someone might say, “Finally, the project is done and dusted!”
  • In a conversation about completing a difficult task, one might say, “I worked all night, but I finally got it done and dusted.”
  • When talking about finishing a meal, someone might say, “I ate every last bite. Dinner is done and dusted.”

2. Wrapped up

This phrase is used to indicate that something has reached its final stage or has been successfully completed. It implies that all loose ends have been tied up and there is nothing more to be done.

  • For instance, after completing a presentation, someone might say, “With that, the presentation is wrapped up.”
  • In a discussion about finishing a project, one might say, “I just need to wrap up a few loose ends and it’ll be complete.”
  • When talking about the end of a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s wrap up this meeting and move on to the next agenda item.”

3. Finito

This Italian slang term is used to indicate that something is finished or done. It is often used to add a playful or dramatic flair to the statement.

  • For example, after completing a challenging workout, someone might say, “I pushed myself to the limit, and now I’m finito!”
  • In a conversation about completing a task, one might say, “I just finished the last assignment. Finito!”
  • When talking about reaching the end of a book, someone might say, “I finally turned the last page. Finito!”

4. In the bag

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been successfully accomplished or achieved. It implies that the desired outcome is guaranteed or assured.

  • For instance, after winning a sports match, someone might say, “We played our best and the victory is in the bag!”
  • In a discussion about completing a difficult task, one might say, “I’ve been working on it for weeks, but now it’s finally in the bag.”
  • When talking about securing a deal, someone might say, “After negotiations, we managed to get the contract in the bag.”

5. Tick off

This phrase is used to indicate that a task or item on a list has been completed or checked off. It emphasizes the act of marking something as finished or accomplished.

  • For example, after finishing a chore, someone might say, “I can finally tick that off my to-do list.”
  • In a conversation about completing a series of errands, one might say, “I managed to tick off everything on my list.”
  • When talking about completing a project, someone might say, “I just need to tick off a few more items before it’s done.”

6. Mission accomplished

This phrase is often used to indicate that a goal or objective has been completed or achieved. It can be used in various contexts to convey a sense of accomplishment or success.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “After months of hard work, we can finally say mission accomplished.”
  • A coach might use the phrase to motivate their team, saying, “Let’s give it our all and make sure we can say mission accomplished at the end of the game.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’ve been working towards this promotion for years, and now I can finally say mission accomplished.”

7. Put the finishing touches

This phrase is used to describe the act of adding the final details or making the final adjustments to complete something. It implies that the task is almost complete and only requires minor adjustments.

  • For instance, an artist might say, “I just need to put the finishing touches on this painting before it’s ready for exhibition.”
  • A writer might mention, “I’ve written the entire manuscript, and now I need to put the finishing touches on the conclusion.”
  • In a home renovation project, someone might say, “We’re almost done with the bathroom remodel, just need to put the finishing touches.”

8. Crossed the finish line

This phrase is often used in sports or competitive contexts to indicate that someone has reached the end or completed a race or competition. It signifies the achievement of a goal or objective.

  • For example, a marathon runner might say, “I trained for months, and today I finally crossed the finish line.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “After years of hard work, we successfully crossed the finish line and achieved our revenue target.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’ve been studying for this exam for weeks, and I’m relieved to finally cross the finish line.”

9. Closed the loop

This phrase is often used to indicate that all necessary steps or actions have been taken to complete a process or resolve all issues. It implies that all loose ends have been tied up.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “We closed the loop on this project by addressing all outstanding issues and completing all required tasks.”
  • In a customer service context, someone might say, “I called the customer back to close the loop and ensure their issue was fully resolved.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I finally closed the loop on my finances by paying off all my debts and organizing my budget.”

10. Put the final nail in the coffin

This phrase is often used metaphorically to indicate the final action or event that leads to the completion or end of something. It implies that the final blow or action seals the fate or outcome.

  • For example, a CEO might say, “Our latest product launch will put the final nail in the coffin for our competition.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The scandal was the final nail in the coffin for the candidate’s campaign.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “Ending that toxic relationship was the final nail in the coffin for my happiness.”

11. Over and done with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is finished or completed and there is no need for further action.

  • For example, “I’m so glad that project is over and done with.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s get this meeting over and done with so we can move on to the next task.”
  • Another might comment, “Once the final exams are over and done with, we can enjoy our summer break.”

12. All set

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is ready or prepared for a particular task or event.

  • For instance, “I have all the ingredients, so I’m all set to start cooking.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t worry, I’ve packed everything we need for the trip. We’re all set.”
  • Another might comment, “I finished my presentation early, so I’m all set for tomorrow’s meeting.”

13. All wrapped up

This phrase is used to indicate that something is fully completed or finished.

  • For example, “I just need to add the finishing touches, and the project will be all wrapped up.”
  • A person might say, “The party is all wrapped up. We can start cleaning up now.”
  • Another might comment, “Once all the paperwork is signed, the deal will be all wrapped up.”

14. All taken care of

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been fully handled or completed.

  • For instance, “I’ve made all the necessary arrangements. Everything is all taken care of.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t worry about the bills. I’ve paid them all. It’s all taken care of.”
  • Another might comment, “Once the repairs are done, the car will be all taken care of.”

15. All finished

This phrase is used to indicate that something is fully completed or done.

  • For example, “I’ve finished all my assignments. I’m all finished for the semester.”
  • A person might say, “The renovations are all finished. The house looks amazing now.”
  • Another might comment, “Once the final touches are done, the painting will be all finished.”

16. All done and dusted

This phrase is used to indicate that a task or activity has been fully completed or finished. It implies that all necessary steps have been taken and there is no further action required.

  • For example, after finishing a project, someone might say, “Finally, it’s all done and dusted.”
  • When discussing a completed event, a person might say, “The party was a success, everything is all done and dusted.”
  • Another usage could be, “I just finished cleaning the house, it’s all done and dusted now.”

17. All buttoned up

This expression is used to describe a situation or task that has been completed in a thorough and organized manner. It implies that all loose ends have been tied up and everything is in order.

  • For instance, after completing a project, someone might say, “We can present it tomorrow, it’s all buttoned up.”
  • When discussing a well-prepared plan, a person might say, “The presentation is all buttoned up, we’re ready to go.”
  • Another usage could be, “I just finished packing for the trip, everything is all buttoned up.”

18. All ticked off

This phrase is used to indicate that a task or goal has been fully accomplished or checked off a list. It implies that all necessary items or actions have been completed.

  • For example, after finishing a long to-do list, someone might say, “I finally got everything ticked off, I feel accomplished.”
  • When discussing completing a set of tasks, a person might say, “I’m all ticked off for the day, time to relax.”
  • Another usage could be, “I just finished running all my errands, my list is all ticked off now.”

19. All checked off

This phrase is used to indicate that all items on a checklist or to-do list have been completed or marked as finished. It implies that all necessary tasks or actions have been checked off.

  • For instance, after completing a set of tasks, someone might say, “I can finally relax now, everything is all checked off.”
  • When discussing a completed checklist, a person might say, “I have all the documents checked off, ready to submit.”
  • Another usage could be, “I just finished going through the list, everything is all checked off.”

20. All over and done with

This phrase is used to indicate that a situation, event, or task has come to an end and is now fully completed. It implies that there is no further involvement or action required.

  • For example, after a challenging project, someone might say, “I’m glad it’s all over and done with.”
  • When discussing the end of a difficult task, a person might say, “The exam is all over and done with, time to celebrate.”
  • Another usage could be, “I just finished packing up the house, it’s all over and done with now.”

21. All finished up

This slang phrase means that something is completely finished or completed. It is often used to indicate that a task or project has been successfully completed.

  • For example, after completing a painting, someone might say, “I’m all finished up with this masterpiece!”
  • In a work setting, a coworker might say, “I’ll have that report all finished up by the end of the day.”
  • When discussing a completed renovation project, someone might say, “The kitchen remodel is all finished up and ready for use.”

22. All signed, sealed, delivered

This slang phrase means that something is completely finished or finalized, often with the connotation that it is official or official paperwork has been completed.

  • For instance, after signing a contract, someone might say, “The deal is all signed, sealed, delivered!”
  • When discussing the completion of a legal process, someone might say, “The divorce papers are all signed, sealed, delivered.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “The proposal is all signed, sealed, delivered and ready for submission.”

23. All sorted out

This slang phrase means that something is completely resolved or organized, often indicating that any issues or problems have been addressed and a solution has been found.

  • For example, when discussing a complicated travel itinerary, someone might say, “Don’t worry, I have it all sorted out.”
  • When discussing a complex problem at work, a coworker might say, “I’ve spent the whole day on it, but it’s all sorted out now.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I had some issues with my finances, but I’ve got it all sorted out now.”

24. All buttoned down

This slang phrase means that something is completely under control or organized, often suggesting that all necessary preparations or arrangements have been made.

  • For instance, when discussing an upcoming event, someone might say, “Don’t worry, I have it all buttoned down.”
  • When discussing a complex project at work, a team leader might say, “We’ve been working hard, and everything is all buttoned down for the presentation.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’ve got my schedule all buttoned down for the week.”

25. All wrapped in a bow

This slang phrase means that something is completely finished or completed, often with the connotation that it has been done in a thorough and meticulous manner.

  • For example, when discussing a perfectly executed plan, someone might say, “It’s all wrapped in a bow.”
  • When discussing a flawlessly organized event, a coordinator might say, “We’ve got everything all wrapped in a bow.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’ve finished all my holiday shopping and have it all wrapped in a bow.”

26. All tied off

This slang phrase means that something has been completed or finished. It implies that all loose ends have been taken care of and everything is in order.

  • For example, “I just finished my project, it’s all tied off now.”
  • A person might say, “I have all my tasks tied off for the day, so I can relax.”
  • Another might say, “Once all the paperwork is tied off, we can move forward with the plan.”

27. All put away

This slang phrase means that something has been fully completed or finished and is no longer a concern. It implies that all necessary actions have been taken and there is nothing more to do.

  • For instance, “I just finished cleaning the house, it’s all put away now.”
  • A person might say, “I have all my work put away for the day, so I can enjoy my evening.”
  • Another might say, “Once all the preparations are put away, we can start the event.”

28. All wrapped and ready

This slang phrase means that something has been fully prepared or completed and is ready to be used or presented. It implies that all necessary steps have been taken and everything is in order.

  • For example, “I just finished wrapping the gifts, they’re all wrapped and ready.”
  • A person might say, “I have all the documents wrapped and ready for the meeting.”
  • Another might say, “Once all the decorations are wrapped and ready, we can start the party.”

29. All taken care of and then some

This slang phrase means that something has been completely handled or completed, and even more has been done than necessary. It implies that all tasks or responsibilities have been fulfilled, and extra effort or attention has been given.

  • For instance, “I finished the report and sent it to the client, all taken care of and then some.”
  • A person might say, “I have all the errands taken care of and then some, so I have some free time.”
  • Another might say, “Once all the arrangements are taken care of and then some, the event will be a huge success.”

30. All in the bag and then some

This slang phrase means that something has been successfully achieved or completed, and even more has been accomplished than expected. It implies that all goals or objectives have been met, and additional achievements have been made.

  • For example, “I finished the project ahead of schedule and exceeded all expectations, it’s all in the bag and then some.”
  • A person might say, “I have all the tasks in the bag and then some, so I can take on more responsibilities.”
  • Another might say, “Once all the sales targets are in the bag and then some, we can celebrate our success.”

31. In the can

This phrase is often used to indicate that a task or project has been successfully completed or finished.

  • For example, after completing a film shoot, a director might say, “That’s a wrap! The movie is in the can.”
  • A person finishing a painting might exclaim, “Finally, it’s in the can!”
  • Someone completing a writing assignment might say, “I’m glad to have that project in the can.”

32. In the clear

This phrase is used to indicate that a situation or task is now free from any obstacles, problems, or uncertainties.

  • For instance, after resolving a misunderstanding, someone might say, “Now that everything is cleared up, we’re in the clear.”
  • A person completing a difficult project might exclaim, “Finally, I’m in the clear!”
  • Someone successfully passing a test might say, “I studied hard and now I’m in the clear.”

33. In the rearview mirror

This phrase is used to indicate that something is now in the past or no longer a concern.

  • For example, after overcoming a difficult challenge, someone might say, “I’m glad that’s in the rearview mirror.”
  • A person reflecting on a past mistake might say, “I’ve learned from my past and it’s now in the rearview mirror.”
  • Someone moving on from a previous relationship might say, “That chapter of my life is finally in the rearview mirror.”

34. Mission complete

This phrase is often used in a military context to indicate that a mission or objective has been successfully completed.

  • For instance, a soldier might radio in, “Mission complete, returning to base.”
  • A person finishing a project at work might say, “Mission complete, I’ve finished all the tasks.”
  • Someone completing a personal goal might exclaim, “Mission complete, I’ve achieved what I set out to do.”

35. Mission fulfilled

This phrase is used to indicate that a mission or purpose has been successfully fulfilled or accomplished.

  • For example, after completing a humanitarian mission, someone might say, “Mission fulfilled, we made a difference.”
  • A person accomplishing a lifelong dream might exclaim, “Mission fulfilled, I’ve achieved my goal.”
  • Someone successfully completing a difficult task might say, “Mission fulfilled, I’ve proven myself capable.”

36. All finalized

This term is used to indicate that something has been completed or finished. It implies that all necessary steps or processes have been carried out and there is nothing left to do.

  • For example, “After months of negotiations, the contract is all finalized.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to make sure all the paperwork is all finalized before we can proceed.”
  • In a conversation about wedding planning, someone might ask, “Have you got all the arrangements all finalized?”

37. All accomplished

This phrase is used to convey that a task or goal has been successfully achieved or completed. It implies that all the necessary actions or objectives have been fulfilled.

  • For instance, “After years of hard work, she can proudly say that her goals are all accomplished.”
  • A coach might say, “The team worked together and all accomplished their individual targets.”
  • In a discussion about personal achievements, someone might share, “I set out to travel the world, and now I can say it’s all accomplished.”
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