Top 35 Slang For Conclude – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to wrapping up a conversation or a project, finding the perfect words to conclude can be a challenge. But fear not, our team at Fluentslang is here to help! We’ve gathered a list of the trendiest and most effective slang for conclude that will have you ending things on a high note. Say goodbye to awkward endings and hello to smooth transitions with our expertly curated collection. Let’s dive in and master the art of wrapping things up in style!

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1. Wrap up

To “wrap up” means to finish or complete something. It is often used to indicate the end of a task or activity.

  • For example, “Let’s wrap up this meeting and move on to the next agenda item.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “With only two minutes left, the team needs to wrap up the game.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Make sure to wrap up your assignments before the end of class.”

2. Call it a day

When someone says “call it a day,” they mean to finish working or to stop for the day. It implies that the work or activity has come to a satisfactory conclusion.

  • For instance, “It’s getting late, let’s call it a day and continue tomorrow.”
  • At the end of a long work shift, a coworker might say, “I’m exhausted, let’s call it a day.”
  • A boss might tell their employees, “Great job today, let’s call it a day and rest up for tomorrow.”

3. Tie up loose ends

To “tie up loose ends” means to finish or resolve unfinished tasks or issues. It refers to completing any remaining or unresolved matters.

  • For example, “Before we conclude the project, let’s tie up any loose ends.”
  • When moving out of a house, someone might say, “I need to tie up some loose ends, like canceling utilities and forwarding mail.”
  • A detective in a crime TV show might say, “I can’t rest until I tie up all the loose ends in this case.”

4. Close out

To “close out” means to bring something to an end, often by completing the final steps or actions.

  • For instance, “We need to close out the financial year by reconciling all accounts.”
  • At the end of a concert, the performer might say, “Thank you, this is our last song to close out the show.”
  • A project manager might say, “Let’s close out this project by submitting the final report and conducting a post-mortem analysis.”

5. Put the finishing touches on

To “put the finishing touches on” means to add final details or make final adjustments to something before considering it complete.

  • For example, “I just need to put the finishing touches on this painting before it’s ready for exhibition.”
  • When preparing a presentation, someone might say, “I’m putting the finishing touches on the slides to make sure everything looks perfect.”
  • A chef might say, “The dish is almost ready, I just need to put the finishing touches on the plating.”

6. Bring to a close

This phrase means to complete or end something, usually in a formal or deliberate manner.

  • For example, “Let’s bring this meeting to a close and discuss the next steps.”
  • A teacher might say, “We will bring the semester to a close with a final exam.”
  • In a speech, a speaker might declare, “In conclusion, I would like to bring my remarks to a close.”

7. Draw to a close

This phrase means to reach the end or conclusion of something.

  • For instance, “As the sun sets, the day draws to a close.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “As the game enters the final minutes, it is drawing to a close.”
  • A writer might describe a story by saying, “The novel draws to a close with a surprising twist.”

8. Wind up

This phrase means to bring something to an end or conclusion.

  • For example, “Let’s wind up this project and move on to the next.”
  • A comedian might say, “I will wind up my set with a hilarious punchline.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might suggest, “We need to wind up this discussion and make a decision.”

9. Finish off

This phrase means to complete or conclude something, often with a final action or effort.

  • For instance, “I just need to finish off this last task and then I’m done for the day.”
  • A chef might say, “I will finish off the dish with a sprinkle of fresh herbs.”
  • In a game, a player might declare, “I will finish off my opponent with a powerful move.”

10. Cap off

This phrase means to conclude something with a final action or element that adds a finishing touch.

  • For example, “Let’s cap off the celebration with a fireworks display.”
  • A presenter might say, “I will cap off my speech with a memorable quote.”
  • In a party, someone might suggest, “Let’s cap off the night with a champagne toast.”

11. Pack it in

This phrase is used to indicate that someone should stop what they are doing or give up on a task or activity. It implies that further effort or continuation is pointless or not worth it.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to solve a difficult puzzle, you might say, “You’ve been trying for hours, maybe it’s time to pack it in.”
  • In a sports context, if a team is losing by a large margin and has no chance of winning, a commentator might say, “They should pack it in and focus on the next game.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their decision to quit a job or end a relationship, saying, “I realized it wasn’t working out, so I decided to pack it in.”

12. Sign off

To “sign off” means to formally end or conclude something. It often refers to the act of finishing a task, project, or communication.

  • For instance, at the end of a business email, a person might write, “I will sign off here. Let me know if you have any further questions.”
  • In a radio or television broadcast, the host might say, “That’s all for today, folks. I’m signing off.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to indicate the end of an article or blog post, saying, “And with that, I’ll sign off. Thanks for reading!”

13. Close the book on

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been concluded or finalized in a definitive and irreversible way. It implies that there is no need for further discussion or consideration.

  • For example, if a court case has been resolved and a verdict has been reached, a news reporter might say, “The judge closed the book on the trial with a final ruling.”
  • In a personal context, if someone has overcome a difficult chapter in their life, they might say, “I’m ready to close the book on that part of my past and move forward.”
  • A sports commentator might use this phrase to describe a team’s victory, saying, “With that last goal, they closed the book on a successful season.”

14. Draw a line under

To “draw a line under” something means to consider it finished or resolved, and to move on from it without dwelling on it or revisiting it.

  • For instance, if a team loses a game and wants to focus on the next one, the coach might say, “Let’s draw a line under this match and start preparing for the next.”
  • In a personal context, if someone has made a mistake and wants to move forward, they might say, “I’ve learned from my error and I’m ready to draw a line under it.”
  • A manager might use this phrase in a meeting to indicate that a decision has been made and it’s time to move on, saying, “We’ve discussed all the options, let’s draw a line under this and implement the chosen strategy.”

15. Settle up

To “settle up” means to pay off a debt or balance, often in the context of a financial transaction or bill. It implies reaching a final agreement or resolution regarding payment.

  • For example, at the end of a meal at a restaurant, a person might say, “Let’s settle up and split the bill.”
  • In a business context, if a client owes money for services rendered, a company might send an invoice with a note saying, “Please settle up by the end of the month.”
  • A friend might use this phrase to indicate that they want to repay a borrowed amount, saying, “I’ll settle up with you as soon as I get my paycheck.”

16. Knock it on the head

To finish or stop something, often abruptly or forcefully. This phrase is often used when referring to ending a discussion, activity, or task.

  • For example, “Let’s knock it on the head and move on to the next topic.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “We’ve been discussing this issue for too long. It’s time to knock it on the head.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We’re running out of time, so let’s knock it on the head and focus on winning the game.”

17. Carry out

To complete or execute a task, plan, or action. This phrase is often used when referring to finishing a specific action or following through with a plan.

  • For instance, “I need to carry out the instructions my boss gave me.”
  • A project manager might say, “We have a list of tasks to carry out in order to meet the deadline.”
  • Someone might ask, “Did you carry out the plan we discussed?”

18. Call off

To cancel or terminate an event, activity, or plan. This phrase is often used when referring to ending or discontinuing something that was previously scheduled or planned.

  • For example, “Due to bad weather, the outdoor concert has been called off.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’m calling off today’s class because of a scheduling conflict.”
  • Someone might cancel a meeting by saying, “I need to call off our appointment.”

19. Put a bow on it

To finish or finalize something, often with a flourish or attention to detail. This phrase is often used when referring to completing a project or task in a satisfactory manner.

  • For instance, “After months of hard work, it’s time to put a bow on it and present our final product.”
  • A chef might say, “Let’s put a bow on this dish by adding a garnish.”
  • Someone might finish a presentation by saying, “And that’s how we put a bow on this project.”

20. Close the book

To end or conclude something, often with a sense of finality. This phrase is often used when referring to finishing a chapter or phase of a project or closing a particular chapter in one’s life.

  • For example, “It’s time to close the book on this chapter of my life and start something new.”
  • A detective might say, “We’ve gathered all the evidence we need. It’s time to close the book on this case.”
  • Someone might reflect on their past by saying, “I’ve closed the book on that relationship and moved on.”

21. Bring to a conclusion

This phrase means to complete or finish something. It implies reaching the end or finalizing a task or project.

  • For example, “Let’s bring this meeting to a conclusion and summarize our main points.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I will now bring my argument to a conclusion by restating my main points.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Make sure to bring your essays to a conclusion by wrapping up your main ideas and providing a final thought.”

22. Come to a close

This phrase is used to describe the ending or completion of something. It suggests that an event or activity is reaching its final stages.

  • For instance, “As the concert comes to a close, the band performs their biggest hit.”
  • At the end of a conference, the organizer might announce, “We are now coming to a close. Thank you all for attending.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The game is about to come to a close, with only a few minutes left on the clock.”

23. Call it a wrap

This phrase is often used in the entertainment industry to indicate the completion of a scene or production. It means to finish or end something.

  • For example, a director on a movie set might say, “That’s a wrap, everyone! We’ve finished filming.”
  • At the end of a long day of work, someone might say, “Let’s call it a wrap and go home.”
  • A project manager might announce, “We’ve successfully completed the project. It’s time to call it a wrap.”

24. Knock off

This phrase is commonly used to refer to finishing work or completing a task. It suggests reaching the end of a workday or completing a specific assignment.

  • For instance, “It’s time to knock off for the day and head home.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Have you knocked off all your tasks for today?”
  • A supervisor might say, “Once you knock off that report, you can take a break.”

25. Put to bed

This phrase means to finish or resolve something. It implies completing a task or issue, often with a sense of finality.

  • For example, “Let’s put this project to bed and move on to the next one.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “We need to put this issue to bed before we can move forward.”
  • A parent might say, “It’s time to put the kids to bed and end the day.”

26. Put the lid on

This phrase means to bring something to an end or to finish a task or project.

  • For example, “Let’s put the lid on this project and move on to the next.”
  • During a meeting, someone might say, “We need to put the lid on this discussion and make a decision.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Put the lid on your assignments and turn them in by the end of the day.”

27. Finish up

This phrase means to complete the remaining tasks or to bring something to a conclusion.

  • For instance, “I just need to finish up a few more things before I can leave for the day.”
  • A chef might say, “Let’s finish up the plating and get these dishes out to the customers.”
  • A student might tell their friend, “I have to finish up my homework before I can go out tonight.”

28. Conclude

This word means to bring something to an end or to reach a decision or agreement.

  • For example, “Let’s conclude this meeting with a summary of our main points.”
  • During a debate, someone might say, “I would like to conclude my argument with a final thought.”
  • A writer might end their article by saying, “In conclusion, we can see that…”

29. Call a halt

This phrase means to stop or put an end to something, often abruptly.

  • For instance, “We need to call a halt to this project and reassess our approach.”
  • During a performance, the director might yell, “Call a halt! We need to fix that lighting issue.”
  • A parent might tell their children, “I’m calling a halt to this argument. It’s time to calm down and find a solution.”

30. Draw the curtain

This phrase means to bring something to a close or end, often in a dramatic or final way.

  • For example, “The team’s loss in the championship game drew the curtain on their season.”
  • At the end of a play, the actor might say, “And with that, we draw the curtain on this incredible performance.”
  • A teacher might announce, “The final exam will draw the curtain on our semester together.”

31. Close the chapter

This phrase is often used to signify the end of a particular phase, event, or situation. It implies that it’s time to move on or let go.

  • For example, after a breakup, someone might say, “It’s time to close the chapter on that relationship and focus on myself.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Let’s close the chapter on this project and start planning for the next one.”
  • A person reflecting on a past experience might say, “I finally closed the chapter on that difficult period of my life and found peace.”

32. Say goodbye to

This phrase is used to indicate that it’s time to stop or end a particular action, behavior, or situation.

  • For instance, when quitting a bad habit, someone might say, “It’s time to say goodbye to smoking.”
  • In a farewell speech, a retiring employee might say, “Today, I say goodbye to this company after 20 years of service.”
  • A person deciding to end a toxic relationship might say, “It’s time to say goodbye to all the negativity and move on to a better life.”

33. Wind down

This phrase is often used to describe the process of slowing down or ending an activity or event.

  • For example, after a long day at work, someone might say, “I need some time to wind down and relax.”
  • In a conversation about a party, a person might say, “As the night went on, the energy started to wind down.”
  • A fitness instructor might advise, “After an intense workout, it’s important to take time to wind down and stretch.”

34. Tie up

This phrase is used to describe the act of completing or finishing a task, project, or situation.

  • For instance, when finishing a report, someone might say, “I just need to tie up a few loose ends before submitting it.”
  • In a conversation about a business deal, a person might say, “We’re almost ready to close the deal, just need to tie up a few details.”
  • A person discussing their weekend plans might say, “I have a few errands to run, but once I tie up those loose ends, I’ll be free to relax.”

35. Come to a resolution

This phrase is used to describe the process of reaching a final decision or finding a solution to a problem or conflict.

  • For example, in a negotiation, someone might say, “After hours of discussion, we finally came to a resolution.”
  • In a conversation about a disagreement, a person might say, “We need to find a way to come to a resolution and move forward.”
  • A mediator in a conflict might say, “Our goal is to help both parties come to a resolution that satisfies their needs.”
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