Top 91 Slang For Consequently – Meaning & Usage

Consequently, when it comes to expressing cause and effect in everyday conversations, having the right slang can make all the difference. Join us as we unveil a collection of trendy phrases that can add flair to your speech and make you sound effortlessly cool. Whether you’re looking to spice up your texts or impress your friends with your linguistic prowess, this list is sure to have you covered.

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1. Ergo

Ergo is a Latin term that means “therefore” or “consequently.” It is used to indicate a logical conclusion or consequence based on the preceding statement or argument.

  • For example, “The weather forecast predicts rain all day; ergo, we should bring umbrellas.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, one might say, “I think, therefore I am; ergo, my existence is undeniable.”
  • A student might use it in an essay, “The evidence overwhelmingly supports this theory; ergo, it can be concluded that…”

2. Thus

Thus is an adverb that means “in this way” or “as a result.” It is used to indicate a conclusion or consequence that follows logically from the preceding information or actions.

  • For instance, “He failed to turn in his assignment on time; thus, he received a lower grade.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “The economic crisis led to widespread poverty; thus, sparking social unrest.”
  • A speaker might use it in a persuasive argument, “This policy will benefit society as a whole; thus, it should be implemented.”

3. Hence

Hence is an adverb that means “for this reason” or “as a result.” It is used to indicate a cause-and-effect relationship, emphasizing the reason or consequence that follows.

  • For example, “He forgot his wallet at home; hence, he couldn’t buy lunch.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Our company has experienced significant growth; hence, we are expanding our operations.”
  • A writer might use it in a formal document, “The data suggests a clear trend; hence, further investigation is warranted.”

4. So

So is a conjunction that means “therefore” or “as a result.” It is used to introduce a logical conclusion or consequence based on the preceding information or actions.

  • For instance, “She studied diligently for the exam; so, she earned a high score.”
  • In a personal conversation, one might say, “I didn’t get enough sleep last night; so, I’m feeling tired.”
  • A writer might use it in an argumentative essay, “The evidence supports this claim; so, it can be concluded that…”

5. Therefore

Therefore is an adverb that means “for that reason” or “as a result.” It is used to indicate a logical conclusion or consequence that follows from the preceding information or argument.

  • For example, “The experiment yielded consistent results; therefore, the hypothesis was proven correct.”
  • In a legal context, one might say, “The defendant was found guilty of the crime; therefore, they will be sentenced.”
  • A speaker might use it in a presentation, “The data supports our hypothesis; therefore, we can confidently draw this conclusion.”

6. As a result

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened as a consequence of a previous action or event. It is often used to explain the outcome or consequence of a situation.

  • For example, “He failed to study for the test, and as a result, he received a low grade.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “The ice caps are melting at an alarming rate. As a result, sea levels are rising.”
  • A news article might state, “The company experienced a major data breach. As a result, millions of customers’ personal information was compromised.”

7. Accordingly

This word is used to indicate that something is done or should be done in a way that is appropriate or suitable based on the previous action or event.

  • For instance, “He received a promotion and was accordingly given more responsibilities.”
  • In a legal context, a judge might say, “The defendant has been found guilty. Accordingly, they will be sentenced to prison.”
  • A manager might say, “The team worked hard and met their targets. Accordingly, they will receive a bonus.”

8. Consequently

This word is used to show that something happened as a direct result or logical consequence of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “He missed his flight, and consequently, he had to reschedule his entire trip.”
  • In a discussion about economic policies, someone might argue, “If taxes are increased, businesses will have less profit. Consequently, they may have to lay off employees.”
  • A news headline might read, “The heavy rainfall caused flooding. Consequently, several roads were closed.”

9. As a consequence

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened as a result or outcome of a previous action or event.

  • For instance, “She ignored her doctor’s advice, and as a consequence, her health deteriorated.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, someone might say, “If we continue to pollute the oceans, as a consequence, marine life will suffer.”
  • A teacher might warn students, “Cheating on exams is not tolerated. As a consequence, you will receive a failing grade.”

10. For this reason

This phrase is used to explain that something is true or happening because of a specific reason or cause.

  • For example, “He is allergic to peanuts. For this reason, he avoids eating any food that may contain peanuts.”
  • In a debate about the importance of exercise, someone might argue, “Regular physical activity is essential for maintaining good health. For this reason, everyone should incorporate exercise into their daily routine.”
  • A business owner might say, “Customer satisfaction is our top priority. For this reason, we always strive to provide excellent service.”

11. In consequence

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened as a direct result of something else. It is often used to explain the cause and effect relationship between two events.

  • For example, “He failed to study for the exam and, in consequence, he received a low grade.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “The company faced financial difficulties and, in consequence, had to lay off several employees.”
  • A speaker might say, “He insulted her, and in consequence, she ended their friendship.”

12. In light of this

This phrase is used to introduce information or a situation that should be taken into account when making a decision or forming an opinion. It is often used to provide context or justification for a particular action.

  • For instance, “In light of this new evidence, we need to reconsider our strategy.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in an essay, saying, “In light of this research, it is clear that climate change is a pressing issue.”
  • A speaker might say, “In light of this recent development, we should be cautious in our approach.”

13. On account of this

This phrase is used to explain that a particular action or event occurred as a result of something else. It is often used to indicate causation or to provide a reason for a decision or action.

  • For example, “He was late for work on account of this heavy traffic.”
  • In a letter, someone might write, “I cannot attend the meeting on account of this prior commitment.”
  • A speaker might say, “On account of this unexpected delay, we will have to reschedule.”

14. On that account

This phrase is used to indicate that a particular action or decision is justified or necessary because of a specific reason. It is often used to emphasize the importance or relevance of a certain factor.

  • For instance, “He was unable to participate in the event, and on that account, he felt left out.”
  • In a debate, a participant might argue, “The evidence clearly supports our position, and on that account, we should be considered the winners.”
  • A speaker might say, “The weather conditions are dangerous, and on that account, we should cancel the outdoor activity.”

15. Thereupon

This word is used to indicate that an action or event occurred immediately after another action or event. It is often used to describe a sequence of events or to show a cause and effect relationship.

  • For example, “He received the news and thereupon left the room.”
  • In a story, a writer might use this word to transition between events, saying, “The hero defeated the villain, and thereupon the town celebrated.”
  • A speaker might say, “She finished her presentation, and thereupon received a round of applause.”

16. Thence

Thence is an archaic term that means “from that place or time.” It is often used to indicate a consequence or result that follows from a previous action or event.

  • For example, “He stole the money and thence fled to a remote island.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “The battle was lost, and thence the kingdom fell.”
  • Another usage could be, “She failed the test, and thence had to retake the class.”

17. Wherefore

Wherefore is an old-fashioned term that means “for what reason or purpose.” It is often used to introduce a consequence or explanation for something that has been previously mentioned.

  • For instance, “He missed the deadline, wherefore he was not considered for the promotion.”
  • In a legal context, one might say, “The defendant committed the crime, wherefore he was sentenced to prison.”
  • Another usage could be, “She broke the rules, wherefore she was disqualified from the competition.”

18. As a corollary

As a corollary is a phrase used to indicate that something is a direct result or consequence of something else. It is often used to show a logical or natural connection between two ideas.

  • For example, “If you study hard, as a corollary, you will do well on the exam.”
  • In a scientific context, one might say, “Increased pollution leads to global warming. As a corollary, we are experiencing more extreme weather events.”
  • Another usage could be, “He ignored the warning signs, as a corollary, he suffered the consequences.”

19. As a result of this

As a result of this is a simple and straightforward phrase that means “because of this.” It is often used to indicate a consequence or outcome that occurs because of a specific action or event.

  • For instance, “He failed to submit the report on time, as a result of this, he was reprimanded by his boss.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The government implemented new regulations, as a result of this, businesses had to adapt.”
  • Another usage could be, “She made a poor decision, as a result of this, she lost the opportunity.”

20. As a sequence

As a sequence is a phrase used to indicate that something occurs in a particular order or arrangement. It is often used to describe a consequence or outcome that follows a specific pattern or sequence.

  • For example, “First, you need to gather the ingredients. As a sequence, you mix them together and bake the cake.”
  • In a mathematical context, one might say, “The numbers are arranged as a sequence, with each one increasing by two.”
  • Another usage could be, “She followed the steps as a sequence, and successfully completed the project.”

21. Thusly

This word is used to indicate that something is done in a certain way or in a particular manner.

  • For example, “The instructions state to fold the paper thusly.”
  • A person might say, “She presented her argument thusly, with clear evidence and logical reasoning.”
  • In a discussion about a recipe, someone might say, “Add the ingredients to the bowl thusly, one at a time.”

22. Henceforth

This word is used to indicate that something will happen or be true from a particular time or point onwards.

  • For instance, “Henceforth, all employees must wear a uniform.”
  • A company might announce, “Henceforth, all meetings will be held virtually.”
  • In a contract, it might state, “Henceforth, any changes to the agreement must be made in writing.”

23. Forthwith

This word is used to indicate that something should be done or will happen immediately.

  • For example, “The manager ordered the employee to leave forthwith.”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “Forthwith, the troops will advance to the next position.”
  • A person might say, “I demand that you apologize forthwith for your rude behavior.”

24. In turn

This phrase is used to indicate that something happens or is done as a result of something else happening or being done.

  • For instance, “She helped me, and in turn, I offered to help her with her project.”
  • In a chain of events, one might say, “He insulted me, and in turn, I retaliated.”
  • A person might explain, “I volunteered at the shelter, and in turn, they provided me with valuable experience.”

25. So then

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a logical consequence or outcome of a previous action or statement.

  • For example, “He failed the test, so then he had to retake the course.”
  • In a discussion about decision-making, someone might say, “I weighed the pros and cons, so then I made my choice.”
  • A person might say, “I saved money, so then I was able to go on vacation.”

26. Resultantly

This term is used to indicate that something happened as a consequence or outcome of a previous event or action.

  • For example, “He failed to study for the exam and resultantly, he received a low grade.”
  • In a discussion about a business decision, one might say, “The company made some poor choices and resultantly, they faced financial difficulties.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team’s lack of coordination resultantly led to their defeat.”

27. Subsequently

This word is used to indicate that something happened after a particular event or action.

  • For instance, “He missed the bus and subsequently arrived late to work.”
  • In a story, one might write, “She lost her job and subsequently had to find a new source of income.”
  • A historian might say, “The war ended, and subsequently, new political alliances were formed.”

28. In the end

This phrase is used to indicate the final outcome or result of a series of events or actions.

  • For example, “They argued for hours, but in the end, they agreed to compromise.”
  • In a discussion about a decision, one might say, “We considered all the options, but in the end, we chose the most practical solution.”
  • A movie review might state, “The plot was confusing, but in the end, everything came together and made sense.”

29. As a sequel

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened as a direct consequence or continuation of a previous event or action.

  • For instance, “The company faced financial difficulties, and as a sequel, they had to lay off employees.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific discovery, one might say, “The experiment yielded unexpected results, and as a sequel, further research was conducted.”
  • A writer might say, “The first book was a success, and as a sequel, the author decided to continue the story with a second book.”

30. As a follow-up

This phrase is used to indicate that something is done or happens in response to a previous event or action.

  • For example, “The doctor examined the patient and as a follow-up, scheduled additional tests.”
  • In a business meeting, one might say, “We discussed the proposal, and as a follow-up, we will gather more data before making a decision.”
  • A teacher might say, “The students completed a project, and as a follow-up, they will present their findings to the class.”

31. As a repercussion

This phrase is used to describe the outcome or consequence of a particular action or event. It emphasizes that something has happened as a direct result of something else.

  • For example, “He didn’t study for the exam, and as a repercussion, he failed.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s poor financial decisions, one might say, “As a repercussion, the company had to lay off several employees.”
  • A person might warn, “If you continue to ignore your health, there will be repercussions.”

32. As a ramification

This phrase is used to describe the result or consequence of a particular action or event. It highlights that something has occurred as a direct effect of something else.

  • For instance, “The cancellation of the event had serious ramifications for the local economy.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial decision, one might say, “The ramification of this policy change is yet to be seen.”
  • A person might caution, “Be aware of the potential ramifications before making a hasty decision.”

33. As a by-product

This phrase is used to describe something that is produced or occurs as an unintended consequence or side effect of a main process or action.

  • For example, “The new technology was developed for military use, but as a by-product, it revolutionized the consumer electronics industry.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, one might say, “Reducing waste is a by-product of adopting sustainable practices.”
  • A person might explain, “Exercise not only improves physical health but also has the by-product of boosting mental well-being.”

34. As a fallout

This phrase is used to describe the negative consequences or aftermath of a particular event or action. It emphasizes the negative impact or fallout that occurs as a result.

  • For instance, “The scandal had far-reaching fallout, leading to the resignation of several high-ranking officials.”
  • In a conversation about a failed business venture, one might say, “The financial fallout was devastating for all involved.”
  • A person might warn, “Think carefully before making a decision that could have long-lasting fallout.”

35. As a fruit

This phrase is used to describe the result or outcome of a particular action or event. It emphasizes that something has been achieved or obtained as a direct result.

  • For example, “She worked hard and, as a fruit, earned a promotion.”
  • In a discussion about a successful project, one might say, “The dedication of the team led to the fruitful completion of the task.”
  • A person might encourage, “Keep pushing forward, and you will reap the fruits of your labor.”

36. As a upshot

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a result or consequence of a previous action or event. It is often used to explain the outcome of a situation.

  • For example, “He didn’t study for the test, and as a upshot, he failed.”
  • In a discussion about poor financial decisions, someone might say, “She spent all her money on unnecessary items, and as a upshot, she couldn’t pay her bills.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain the outcome of a series of events, saying, “He missed his flight, and as a upshot, he couldn’t attend the conference.”

37. As a result of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct consequence of a previous action or event. It is often used to explain the cause of a particular outcome.

  • For instance, “As a result of the heavy rain, the game was canceled.”
  • In a conversation about a car accident, someone might say, “As a result of the driver’s negligence, the other car was damaged.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain the consequences of a decision, stating, “As a result of his poor choices, he lost his job.”

38. As a consequence of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct outcome or effect of a previous action or event. It is often used to explain the cause and effect relationship between two things.

  • For example, “As a consequence of his actions, he faced serious consequences.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “As a consequence of global warming, sea levels are rising.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain the negative effects of a decision, stating, “As a consequence of his reckless behavior, he lost the trust of his friends.”

39. As a corollary of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a logical or natural consequence of a previous action or event. It is often used to explain a secondary or indirect effect.

  • For instance, “As a corollary of the new regulations, businesses had to adapt their practices.”
  • In a conversation about technological advancements, someone might say, “As a corollary of increased automation, job opportunities in certain industries decreased.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain the unintended consequences of a policy, stating, “As a corollary of the new tax law, some individuals faced higher tax bills.”

40. As a sequel to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a result or continuation of a previous action or event. It is often used to explain the subsequent events or developments.

  • For example, “As a sequel to the successful movie, a sequel was released.”
  • In a discussion about a book series, someone might say, “As a sequel to the first book, the second book delves deeper into the characters’ lives.”
  • A person might use this phrase to explain the natural progression of events, stating, “As a sequel to the initial meeting, they decided to collaborate on a project.”

41. As a follow-up to

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done as a result of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “As a follow-up to our meeting last week, I have prepared a report with the updated data.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “As a follow-up to our initial brainstorming session, let’s schedule a follow-up meeting.”
  • A manager might communicate, “As a follow-up to the customer complaint, we have implemented new procedures to improve our service.”

42. As a repercussion of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done as a direct consequence or result of a previous action or event.

  • For instance, “As a repercussion of his reckless driving, he lost his license.”
  • In a conversation about a company’s decision, someone might say, “As a repercussion of the budget cuts, several employees were laid off.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “As a repercussion of your behavior, you will be grounded for a week.”

43. As a ramification of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done as a direct result or consequence of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “As a ramification of the economic downturn, many businesses had to close.”
  • In a discussion about a policy change, someone might say, “As a ramification of the new regulations, we need to update our procedures.”
  • A teacher might explain, “As a ramification of not studying, you may not perform well on the exam.”

44. As a by-product of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being produced as an unintended consequence or secondary effect of a primary action or event.

  • For instance, “As a by-product of the manufacturing process, toxic waste is generated.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific experiment, someone might say, “As a by-product of the reaction, a new compound was formed.”
  • A chef might explain, “As a by-product of cooking meat, fat is rendered and can be used for other culinary purposes.”

45. As a fallout of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done as a consequence or result of a previous action or event, often with negative or undesirable implications.

  • For example, “As a fallout of the scandal, several high-ranking officials resigned.”
  • In a discussion about a conflict, someone might say, “As a fallout of the disagreement, the two friends stopped talking to each other.”
  • A journalist might report, “As a fallout of the economic crisis, unemployment rates soared.”

46. As a fruit of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct outcome or consequence of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “As a fruit of their hard work, they were promoted to higher positions.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, one might say, “The company’s profits increased, as a fruit of their strategic marketing campaign.”
  • Another usage could be, “As a fruit of his dedication, he achieved his fitness goals.”

47. As a upshot of

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct consequence or outcome of a previous action or event.

  • For instance, “As a upshot of their collaboration, the project was completed ahead of schedule.”
  • In a conversation about a failed experiment, one might say, “As a upshot of the incorrect measurements, the results were completely off.”
  • Another example could be, “As a upshot of their hard work, they were rewarded with a promotion.”

48. As a consequence of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct outcome or effect of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “As a consequence of this decision, the company faced financial losses.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, one might say, “As a consequence of this global warming, sea levels are rising.”
  • Another usage could be, “As a consequence of this accident, traffic was backed up for hours.”

49. As a corollary of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct consequence or outcome of a previous action or event.

  • For instance, “As a corollary of this policy, the company experienced a decrease in profits.”
  • In a conversation about a new law, one might say, “As a corollary of this legislation, individuals have more rights.”
  • Another example could be, “As a corollary of this research, new treatment options were discovered.”

50. As a sequel to this

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a direct outcome or consequence of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “As a sequel to this incident, an investigation was launched.”
  • In a discussion about a successful project, one might say, “As a sequel to this collaboration, the team received recognition.”
  • Another usage could be, “As a sequel to this decision, the company’s reputation was damaged.”

51. As a follow-up to this

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done as a direct consequence of a previous event or action.

  • For example, “As a follow-up to this meeting, we will schedule another one next week.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “As a follow-up to this, we will need to gather more data before making a decision.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “As a follow-up to this email, please complete the assigned tasks by the end of the day.”

52. As a repercussion of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something negative or undesirable is happening as a direct result of a previous event or action.

  • For instance, “As a repercussion of this decision, we lost several key clients.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial policy, someone might say, “As a repercussion of this, public trust in the government has significantly decreased.”
  • A news article might report, “As a repercussion of this incident, stricter security measures will be implemented.”

53. As a ramification of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something significant or far-reaching is happening as a direct result of a previous event or action.

  • For example, As a ramification of this policy change, the company’s profits increased by 20%.
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “As a ramification of this, coastal areas are experiencing more frequent and severe storms.”
  • A teacher might explain, “As a ramification of this behavior, the student will face disciplinary action.”

54. As a by-product of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something unintended or secondary is happening as a direct result of a previous event or action.

  • For instance, “As a by-product of this project, we discovered a more efficient manufacturing process.”
  • In a conversation about a new diet, someone might say, “As a by-product of this, I’ve noticed an increase in my energy levels.”
  • A scientist might explain, “As a by-product of this reaction, a small amount of gas is released.”

55. As a fallout of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something negative or detrimental is happening as a direct result of a previous event or action.

  • For example, “As a fallout of this scandal, several high-ranking officials resigned.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might say, “As a fallout of this, many employees lost their jobs.”
  • A news report might state, “As a fallout of this incident, public trust in the company has been severely damaged.”

56. As a fruit of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or has happened as a direct consequence of a previous action or event.

  • For example, “The company implemented new marketing strategies, and as a fruit of this, their sales increased significantly.”
  • In a discussion about the impact of climate change, someone might say, “The rising temperatures are causing extreme weather events, as a fruit of this, we’re seeing more frequent hurricanes.”
  • A teacher might explain to their students, “You need to study diligently, as a fruit of this, you’ll improve your grades.”

57. As a upshot of this

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or has happened as a direct consequence of a previous action or event.

  • For instance, “The team worked hard on their project, and as a upshot of this, they won the competition.”
  • In a conversation about a new government policy, someone might say, “Taxes will increase, and as a upshot of this, people will have less disposable income.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “If you don’t finish your homework, as a upshot of this, you won’t be able to play video games.”

58. For that reason

This phrase is used to introduce a statement or conclusion that is based on or supported by a previous statement or situation.

  • For example, “She forgot her passport, for that reason, she couldn’t board the plane.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of exercise, someone might say, “Regular physical activity is essential for maintaining good health, for that reason, it’s recommended to engage in at least 30 minutes of exercise each day.”
  • A manager might explain to their team, “We need to meet the deadline, for that reason, we’ll need to work extra hours.”

59. That being said

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or opposing statement to something that has been said previously.

  • For instance, “She didn’t have much experience, but she got the job. That being said, she proved herself to be a quick learner.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I understand your point of view, but that being said, I have to disagree.”
  • A teacher might give feedback to a student, “Your essay was well-structured and supported with evidence. That being said, you could work on improving your grammar.”

60. In that case

This phrase is used to indicate that a certain statement or situation is true or accurate, and as a result, a specific action or consequence will follow.

  • For example, “If you’re not feeling well, in that case, you should stay home and rest.”
  • In a discussion about potential risks, someone might say, “If the weather forecast predicts a storm, in that case, we should cancel the outdoor event.”
  • A friend might give advice, “If you want to avoid traffic, in that case, you should leave early.”

61. In that event

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or be true if a particular event occurs. It suggests a cause-and-effect relationship between the event and the outcome.

  • For example, “If it rains, we’ll have to cancel the picnic. In that event, we can reschedule for next weekend.”
  • A person discussing potential risks might say, “If the power goes out, we won’t be able to use the elevator. In that event, we’ll have to take the stairs.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might argue, “If the defendant is found guilty, then in that event, they should receive the maximum sentence.”

62. In that regard

This phrase is used to introduce a statement or topic that is related to or connected with something previously mentioned. It is often used to provide additional information or perspective on a specific aspect or point.

  • For instance, “The company is committed to sustainability. In that regard, they have implemented recycling programs and reduced their carbon footprint.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “Many schools are transitioning to online learning. In that regard, access to technology becomes crucial.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might reflect, “I’ve made significant progress in my career. In that regard, I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had.”

63. In that sense

This phrase is used to specify or clarify the meaning of something in a particular context or aspect. It helps to define or explain a concept or idea from a specific perspective.

  • For example, “Creativity can be defined in many ways. In that sense, it’s about thinking outside the box and finding unique solutions.”
  • A person discussing cultural differences might say, “In some cultures, punctuality is highly valued. In that sense, being on time is considered a sign of respect.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might argue, “Happiness can be subjective. In that sense, it’s important to define what brings us personal fulfillment.”

64. By extension

This phrase is used to indicate that something is a logical consequence or extension of a previous statement or situation. It suggests that a particular idea or concept naturally follows from or is connected to another.

  • For instance, “The company has expanded its product line. By extension, they have increased their customer base.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might say, “Freedom of speech is a fundamental right. By extension, it includes the right to express unpopular opinions.”
  • A person discussing environmental conservation might argue, “Reducing plastic waste is important. By extension, using reusable bags and containers becomes essential.”

65. By the same token

This phrase is used to indicate that a particular statement or action is justified or valid for the same reasons as a previous statement or action. It suggests that the same logic or principle applies in both cases.

  • For example, “If you expect others to be honest, then by the same token, you should also be honest.”
  • In a discussion about equality, someone might say, “If we believe in equal rights for all, then by the same token, we should support marriage equality.”
  • A person discussing workplace policies might argue, “If employees are expected to be punctual, then by the same token, employers should be respectful of their time.”

66. In this way

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done in a specific manner or fashion. It is often used to explain a process or describe a situation.

  • For example, “I followed the recipe exactly and cooked the dish in this way.”
  • In a discussion about problem-solving techniques, someone might suggest, “In this way, we can approach the issue from a different angle.”
  • A teacher might explain, “To solve this math problem, you can break it down in this way.”

67. In the same way

This phrase is used to show that something is happening or being done in a manner that is comparable or alike to something else. It is often used to draw comparisons or make connections between different situations.

  • For instance, “Just as she succeeded in her career, I hope to achieve in the same way.”
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might say, “In the same way that children learn from their parents, they also learn from their peers.”
  • A teacher might explain, “In the same way that plants need sunlight to grow, humans need love and support to thrive.”

68. In a similar vein

This phrase is used to indicate that something is related or similar to what has been previously mentioned or discussed. It is often used to introduce a related topic or provide additional information.

  • For example, “He enjoys playing the guitar. In a similar vein, he also plays the ukulele.”
  • In a conversation about different types of music, someone might say, “Jazz and blues are both rooted in African American culture. In a similar vein, gospel music also has deep cultural significance.”
  • A writer might explain, “The author’s first novel was well-received. In a similar vein, her second novel explores similar themes of love and loss.”

69. In like manner

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being done or happening in a similar way to what has been previously mentioned. It is often used to express agreement or to show that the same principle applies.

  • For instance, “She treated her coworkers with respect, and in like manner, they treated her with kindness.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “Each team member contributes their unique skills. In like manner, we can achieve our goals.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Just as we use evidence to support our arguments in writing, we also use evidence to support our claims in scientific experiments.”

70. In the same vein

This phrase is used to indicate that something is happening or being done in a manner that is comparable or alike to something else. It is often used to draw connections or make comparisons between different situations.

  • For example, “He enjoys hiking and camping. In the same vein, he also enjoys rock climbing.”
  • In a conversation about different art forms, someone might say, “Painting and sculpture are both forms of visual expression. In the same vein, photography also captures moments and emotions.”
  • A writer might explain, “The first chapter sets the tone for the book. In the same vein, the opening scene of a movie establishes the mood for the story.”

71. In the same fashion

This phrase is used to express that something is done in a similar way or manner.

  • For example, “She handled the situation in the same fashion as her predecessor.”
  • In a discussion about different cooking techniques, someone might say, “You can cook the steak on the grill or in the same fashion as you would in a cast-iron skillet.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to transition between two paragraphs, saying, “In the same fashion, the protagonist faces a similar dilemma in the next chapter.”

72. With that being said

This phrase is used to introduce a contrasting or qualifying statement after making a previous statement.

  • For instance, “The team worked hard to prepare for the game. With that being said, they were still outplayed by their opponents.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I understand your point, but with that being said, I still believe we should prioritize education.”
  • A speaker might use this phrase to acknowledge a different perspective, saying, “Some may argue that the solution is simple. With that being said, we must consider the potential consequences.”

73. In effect

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is essentially or practically the case.

  • For example, “The new law, in effect, bans smoking in all public places.”
  • In a discussion about organizational changes, someone might say, “The new policy, in effect, restructures the entire department.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to summarize a complex concept, saying, “The proposed changes, in effect, aim to streamline the process and improve efficiency.”

74. In conclusion

This phrase is used to introduce a final statement or summary at the end of a discussion or presentation.

  • For instance, “In conclusion, it is clear that climate change poses a significant threat to our planet.”
  • In a persuasive essay, someone might say, “In conclusion, the evidence overwhelmingly supports the need for stricter gun control laws.”
  • A speaker might use this phrase to wrap up a speech, saying, “In conclusion, let us remember the importance of kindness and empathy in our daily lives.”

75. In the long run

This phrase is used to express that something will have a greater impact or be more significant over time.

  • For example, “Investing in renewable energy sources may require upfront costs, but in the long run, it will benefit both the environment and the economy.”
  • In a discussion about personal relationships, someone might say, “Honesty and trust are crucial for a healthy relationship in the long run.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to emphasize the importance of perseverance, saying, “It may be challenging now, but in the long run, your hard work will pay off.”

76. In the final analysis

This phrase is used to indicate the ultimate or final conclusion or result of a situation or event. It suggests that after careful consideration or evaluation, this is the ultimate outcome or decision.

  • For example, “In the final analysis, it was clear that the project was a success.”
  • A person might say, “We weighed all the options and, in the final analysis, decided to go with Plan A.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might conclude, “In the final analysis, the solution requires a combination of factors.”

77. In the grand scheme of things

This phrase is used to put a specific event or situation into perspective by considering the larger context or long-term consequences. It suggests that in the grand scheme of things, this particular event or situation may not be as significant as it seems.

  • For instance, “Yes, it’s an inconvenience, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s not a big deal.”
  • A person might say, “In the grand scheme of things, this setback is just a minor obstacle.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might say, “In the grand scheme of things, this setback is just a small step backward.”

78. In the broader context

This phrase is used to consider a specific event or situation within the larger context or framework. It suggests that in order to fully understand or evaluate the event or situation, it is important to consider the broader context or surrounding factors.

  • For example, “In the broader context, this decision is part of a larger trend towards sustainability.”
  • A person might say, “In the broader context, this incident is just one small part of a much larger issue.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might say, “In the broader context of the time period, this event had far-reaching implications.”

79. In the larger scheme of things

This phrase is used to consider a specific event or situation within the larger context or perspective. It suggests that in order to fully understand or evaluate the event or situation, it is important to consider the larger scheme or overall perspective.

  • For instance, “Yes, it’s frustrating in the moment, but in the larger scheme of things, it’s not a big deal.”
  • A person might say, “In the larger scheme of things, this setback is just a temporary obstacle.”
  • In a discussion about societal issues, someone might say, “In the larger scheme of things, this particular issue is just a symptom of a much deeper problem.”

80. In the ultimate analysis

This phrase is used to indicate the ultimate or final conclusion or result of a situation or event. It suggests that after careful consideration or evaluation, this is the ultimate outcome or decision.

  • For example, “In the ultimate analysis, it was clear that the team had given their best effort.”
  • A person might say, “We considered all the options and, in the ultimate analysis, chose the most effective solution.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, someone might conclude, “In the ultimate analysis, the solution requires a combination of factors.”

81. In the ultimate scheme of things

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is considered in the broader context or long-term perspective. It implies that the mentioned outcome or consequence is of lesser importance compared to the bigger picture.

  • For example, someone might say, “Yes, you made a mistake, but in the ultimate scheme of things, it won’t matter.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, a person might argue, “We need to focus on renewable energy because, in the ultimate scheme of things, it will save the planet.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Remember, in the ultimate scheme of things, your failures don’t define you.”

82. In the final reckoning

This phrase is used to indicate the ultimate or final result or conclusion of a situation. It suggests that after considering all factors or evaluating all aspects, the mentioned consequence is the ultimate outcome.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He may have won a few battles, but in the final reckoning, he lost the war.”
  • In a debate about the economy, a person might argue, “In the end reckoning, the government’s policies will determine the country’s prosperity.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team gave it their all, but in the final reckoning, they fell short of victory.”

83. In the end result

This phrase is used to indicate the consequence or outcome of a situation. It suggests that after considering all factors or events, the mentioned consequence is what ultimately happened.

  • For example, someone might say, “He ignored all warnings, and in the end result, he lost everything.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, a person might say, “The lack of planning led to delays, and in the end result, the project was a disaster.”
  • A teacher might warn students, “If you don’t study, in the end result, you won’t pass the exam.”

84. In the final outcome

This phrase is used to indicate the ultimate or conclusive consequence of a situation. It suggests that after considering all factors or events, the mentioned consequence is the final result.

  • For instance, someone might say, “We tried different strategies, but in the final outcome, we didn’t achieve our goal.”
  • In a discussion about a legal case, a person might argue, “The evidence presented will determine the final outcome of the trial.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “Focus on giving your best effort, and in the final outcome, we’ll come out victorious.”

85. In the end game

This phrase is used to refer to the last or concluding part of a process or situation. It suggests that the mentioned consequence is what will ultimately happen at the end.

  • For example, someone might say, “They are just delaying the inevitable. In the end game, they will have to face the consequences.”
  • In a discussion about a negotiation, a person might say, “Both parties have made their final offers, and now we’re in the end game.”
  • A chess player might say, “I sacrificed my pieces strategically, and now I’m in the end game with a winning position.”

86. In the ultimate outcome

This phrase is used to indicate the final or ultimate result of a series of events or actions. It suggests that the outcome was the expected or inevitable consequence of what came before.

  • For example, “He ignored all the warnings, and in the ultimate outcome, he failed the exam.”
  • Someone might say, “She took a risk and invested all her savings in the stock market. In the ultimate outcome, she became a millionaire.”
  • In a discussion about a long-term project, a person might comment, “It was a challenging journey, but in the ultimate outcome, we achieved our goals.”

87. In the grand finale

This phrase is used to describe the final or concluding event or action in a series. It implies that the finale is significant and has a major impact on the overall outcome.

  • For instance, “He worked tirelessly for months, and in the grand finale, he won the championship.”
  • A person might say, “After years of hard work, she finally published her book. In the grand finale, it became a bestseller.”
  • In a discussion about a TV series, someone might comment, “The show had a thrilling plot, and in the grand finale, all the loose ends were tied up.”

88. In the grand result

This phrase is used to indicate the overall or final result of a series of actions or events. It suggests that the result is significant or noteworthy.

  • For example, “He made several strategic moves, and in the grand result, he achieved massive success.”
  • A person might say, “We worked hard as a team, and in the grand result, we exceeded our sales targets.”
  • In a discussion about a political campaign, someone might comment, “The candidate’s strong message resonated with voters, and in the grand result, he won the election.”

89. In the grand conclusion

This phrase is used to describe the final or concluding part of a series of events or actions. It implies that the conclusion is significant and has a major impact on the overall outcome.

  • For instance, “After a long investigation, the detective uncovered the truth. In the grand conclusion, the criminal was arrested.”
  • A person might say, “The research project involved months of work, and in the grand conclusion, groundbreaking discoveries were made.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might comment, “The plot built up to a thrilling climax, and in the grand conclusion, all the mysteries were solved.”

90. In the grand outcome

This phrase is used to indicate the final or overall result of a series of events or actions. It suggests that the outcome is significant or noteworthy.

  • For example, “They invested heavily in research and development, and in the grand outcome, they revolutionized the industry.”
  • A person might say, “She took a leap of faith and started her own business. In the grand outcome, she achieved financial independence.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific experiment, someone might comment, “The team conducted numerous trials, and in the grand outcome, they discovered a groundbreaking solution.”

91. In the grand end

This phrase is used to indicate what will happen or the result of a situation. It implies that something will ultimately happen as a consequence.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He didn’t study for the exam, so in the grand end, he failed.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, one might say, “I decided to pursue my passion, and in the grand end, it was the best decision I made.”
  • A person reflecting on their life choices might say, “I made a lot of mistakes, but in the grand end, they led me to where I am today.”
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