Top 37 Slang For Considering – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to making decisions, having the right words to express your thoughts is key. “Slang for considering” is all about helping you navigate through the process of contemplating choices with style and flair. Our team has put together a list that will not only expand your vocabulary but also give you the confidence to make those tough decisions. So, why wait? Dive in and level up your decision-making game today!

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1. Pondering

This term refers to the act of thinking deeply or carefully about something. It implies a level of introspection and reflection.

  • For example, “I’m pondering whether to take that job offer.”
  • A person might say, “I need some time to ponder my options before making a decision.”
  • Another might ask, “What are you pondering about?”

2. Mulling over

To “mull over” something means to consider or think about it deeply and at length. It suggests a process of careful examination and evaluation.

  • For instance, “I’ve been mulling over whether to go on that trip.”
  • Someone might say, “I need more time to mull over the proposal before giving my answer.”
  • A person might ask, “What are you mulling over right now?”

3. Contemplating

This term refers to the act of reflecting on or considering something deeply and thoughtfully. It implies a level of introspection and thoughtful examination.

  • For example, “I’m contemplating whether to start a new business.”
  • A person might say, “I need some quiet time to contemplate my next move.”
  • Another might ask, “What are you contemplating at the moment?”

4. Weighing up

To “weigh up” something means to carefully consider and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages or the pros and cons of a situation or decision.

  • For instance, “I’m weighing up the benefits and drawbacks of buying a new car.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to weigh up the potential risks before making a final decision.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you weighed up all the options?”

5. Deliberating

To “deliberate” means to engage in careful thought and consideration. It suggests a process of thoughtful examination and analysis.

  • For example, “I’m deliberating whether to accept the job offer.”
  • A person might say, “I need some time to deliberate before giving my answer.”
  • Another might ask, “What are you deliberating about right now?”

6. Reflecting on

This phrase refers to the act of carefully considering or pondering something. It implies a thoughtful and introspective approach to examining a situation or topic.

  • For example, “I’ve been reflecting on my career choices and considering a new path.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “Reflecting on my past mistakes has helped me learn and grow.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their thought process, saying, “I’ve been reflecting on what you said and I think you have a point.”

7. Ruminating

This term describes the act of excessively thinking about something, often to the point of obsession or overanalysis. It implies a repetitive and prolonged contemplation.

  • For instance, “I can’t stop ruminating on that embarrassing moment from yesterday.”
  • In a discussion about anxiety, someone might say, “Ruminating on negative thoughts can contribute to increased anxiety.”
  • A person might use this term to express their mental state, saying, “I’ve been ruminating on the decision all day and still can’t make up my mind.”

8. Assessing

This word refers to the process of carefully examining and evaluating a situation or problem. It implies a systematic and objective approach to understanding and making judgments.

  • For example, “I’ve been assessing the feasibility of starting my own business.”
  • In a conversation about project management, someone might say, “Assessing risks and potential outcomes is a crucial step in planning.”
  • A person might use this word to express their thought process, saying, “I’ve been assessing the pros and cons before making a decision.”

9. Speculating

This term describes the act of forming opinions or making guesses about something based on limited information or evidence. It implies a degree of uncertainty and conjecture.

  • For instance, “I’m just speculating, but I think she might be planning a surprise party.”
  • In a discussion about future trends, someone might say, “Speculating about technological advancements can be exciting and challenging.”
  • A person might use this term to express their thought process, saying, “I’m speculating about the possible outcomes of the upcoming election.”

10. Reviewing

This word refers to the act of carefully examining or evaluating something, often with the intention of providing feedback or criticism. It implies a thorough and systematic analysis.

  • For example, “I’m reviewing the latest book by my favorite author.”
  • In a conversation about performance evaluations, someone might say, “Reviewing employee performance is an important part of the management process.”
  • A person might use this word to express their current activity, saying, “I’m reviewing my notes before the exam tomorrow.”

11. Investigating

This term refers to actively gathering information or conducting a thorough examination of a situation or topic. “Investigating” often implies a more formal and systematic approach to gathering evidence or facts.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We are currently investigating the crime scene for any clues.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial event, someone might comment, “I’m investigating the different perspectives to form my own opinion.”
  • A journalist might write, “The reporter spent months investigating the corruption scandal to uncover the truth.”

12. Appraising

To “appraise” means to assess or determine the value, worth, or quality of something. It is often used in the context of evaluating the monetary value of an item, but can also refer to evaluating the overall merit or significance of something.

  • For instance, a real estate agent might say, “I will appraise the house to determine its market value.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “Appraising a painting requires knowledge of the artist’s technique and historical context.”
  • A collector might say, “I enjoy appraising antique items to discover their hidden value.”

13. Estimating

To “estimate” means to make an approximate calculation or judgment based on limited information or experience. It involves using available data and reasoning to arrive at a likely or rough idea of a certain quantity or outcome.

  • For example, a contractor might say, “I am estimating the cost of the renovation based on the size of the project.”
  • In a conversation about travel expenses, someone might comment, “I’m estimating that the flight tickets will cost around $500.”
  • A student might say, “I’m estimating that the project will take me about two hours to complete.”

14. Gauging

To “gauge” means to measure, evaluate, or assess something. It involves using various methods or criteria to determine the size, extent, or quality of something.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I am gauging the students’ understanding of the topic through a quiz.”
  • In a discussion about public opinion, someone might comment, “Polls are often used to gauge the popularity of political candidates.”
  • A chef might say, “I’m gauging the cooking time by checking the internal temperature of the meat.”

15. Musing

To “muse” means to think deeply or reflect on something. It involves engaging in contemplation or daydreaming, often in a relaxed or leisurely manner.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I’m musing about potential story ideas while taking a walk.”
  • In a conversation about life choices, someone might comment, “I’ve been musing on whether to pursue a career change.”
  • A philosopher might say, “Musing on the nature of existence is a fundamental aspect of human thought.”

16. Reflecting

This term refers to thinking deeply or carefully about something, often in a thoughtful or introspective manner.

  • For example, after a difficult decision, someone might say, “I need some time to reflect on what just happened.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, one might say, “I’ve been reflecting on my past mistakes and how I can learn from them.”
  • A person discussing a recent event might ask, “What are your reflections on the situation?”

17. Evaluating

This word describes the process of examining or judging something to determine its value, worth, or quality.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I am currently evaluating my students’ performance on the last test.”
  • In a business context, someone might discuss, “Evaluating the success of a marketing campaign based on key performance indicators.”
  • A person considering a potential purchase might say, “I am evaluating different options before making a decision.”

18. Weighing

This term suggests the act of carefully considering or pondering options or factors before making a decision.

  • For example, someone might say, “I am weighing the pros and cons of accepting a new job offer.”
  • In a discussion about different courses of action, one might say, “We need to weigh all possible outcomes before making a decision.”
  • A person discussing a difficult choice might ask, “What factors are you weighing in your decision-making process?”

19. Digesting

This word describes the act of mentally absorbing or assimilating information or experiences.

  • For instance, after a long meeting or presentation, someone might say, “I need some time to digest all the information.”
  • In a conversation about a thought-provoking book, one might say, “I’m still digesting the ideas presented in that chapter.”
  • A person reflecting on a recent experience might say, “I’m still digesting everything that happened.”

20. Studying

This term refers to the act of closely observing or analyzing something in order to gain knowledge or understanding.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to spend some time studying for my upcoming exam.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, one might say, “I’ve been studying the different perspectives and arguments surrounding the topic.”
  • A person researching a particular subject might say, “I’ve been studying the latest research and findings in the field.”

21. Conjecturing

This term refers to the act of forming an opinion or making an educated guess based on incomplete information. “Conjecturing” is often used to describe the process of considering different possibilities or outcomes.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m just conjecturing here, but I think she might be the culprit.”
  • In a discussion about a future event, a person might speculate, “I’m conjecturing that the concert will be sold out.”
  • Another might say, “Conjecturing about the outcome of the election is a popular topic of conversation.”

22. Questioning

This term refers to the act of expressing uncertainty or skepticism about something. “Questioning” is often used to describe the process of considering different perspectives or seeking clarification.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m questioning the accuracy of that statement.”
  • In a debate, a person might challenge an argument by saying, “I’m questioning the logic behind your reasoning.”
  • Another might express doubt by saying, “I’m questioning whether that plan will work.”

23. Brooding

This term refers to the act of deep thought or contemplation. “Brooding” is often used to describe the process of considering something deeply or intensely.

  • For example, someone might say, “He was brooding over the decision for hours.”
  • In a discussion about a complex problem, a person might express the need for brooding by saying, “We need to brood over this issue before making a decision.”
  • Another might describe their thought process by saying, “I spend a lot of time brooding on life’s big questions.”

24. Chewing on

This term refers to the act of thinking about something deeply or considering it carefully. “Chewing on” is often used to describe the process of mentally processing information or ideas.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need some time to chew on that proposal.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult decision, a person might express the need for chewing on the options by saying, “Let’s chew on these choices before making a final decision.”
  • Another might describe their thought process by saying, “I like to chew on ideas before sharing my opinion.”

25. Meditating

This term refers to the act of deep thought or contemplation. “Meditating” is often used to describe the process of considering something calmly and quietly.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need some time to meditate on this problem.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, a person might express the need for meditating by saying, “I find meditating on my life choices helps me make better decisions.”
  • Another might describe their thought process by saying, “I like to meditate on the meaning of life.”

26. Cogitating

Cogitating refers to the act of thinking deeply or pondering a particular topic or problem. It implies a level of concentration and reflection.

  • For example, “I need some time to cogitate on this decision before I make up my mind.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “I’ve been cogitating on this problem for days, and I still haven’t found a solution.”
  • A friend might ask, “What are you cogitating about? You look lost in thought.”

27. Puzzling over

Puzzling over means to spend time and effort trying to understand or solve a problem or mystery. It suggests a sense of confusion or bewilderment.

  • For instance, “I’ve been puzzling over this riddle all day, and I still can’t figure it out.”
  • If someone is struggling to understand a complex concept, they might say, “I’ve been puzzling over this equation for hours.”
  • A friend might ask, “What are you puzzling over? Maybe I can help.”

28. Debating

Debating involves discussing and arguing different viewpoints or opinions on a particular topic. It often involves presenting arguments, counterarguments, and counter-counterarguments.

  • For example, “We spent hours debating the pros and cons of the new policy.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “We need to have a healthy debate about the best way to address this issue.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you want to debate the merits of this book? I loved it, but I know you had some reservations.”

29. Assimilating

Assimilating means to take in and understand information or ideas. It implies the process of absorbing and incorporating new knowledge or concepts.

  • For instance, “I need some time to assimilate all the information from that lecture.”
  • If someone is learning a new language, they might say, “I’m still assimilating the grammar rules.”
  • A friend might ask, “How are you assimilating all the new information from your research?”

30. Chewing the fat

Chewing the fat means to have a casual and leisurely conversation, often about various topics without a specific purpose or goal. It implies a relaxed and informal exchange of ideas.

  • For example, “We spent the afternoon chewing the fat and catching up on each other’s lives.”
  • If friends are sitting around and chatting, someone might say, “Let’s just chew the fat and enjoy each other’s company.”
  • A coworker might suggest, “Instead of a formal meeting, let’s just chew the fat and brainstorm ideas.”

31. Brainstorming

This is a process of generating creative ideas and solutions through group or individual thinking. It involves open and spontaneous discussion to come up with new and innovative concepts.

  • For example, “Let’s have a brainstorming session to come up with ideas for our new marketing campaign.”
  • During a team meeting, someone might suggest, “I think we should start brainstorming different ways to improve our customer service.”
  • A creative professional might say, “I always carry a notebook with me to jot down any brainstorming ideas that come to mind.”

32. Interrogating

This refers to the act of asking a series of questions in order to gather information or seek clarification. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a thorough examination or analysis of a situation.

  • For instance, “The detective spent hours interrogating the suspect to get to the truth.”
  • During a job interview, an interviewer might ask, “Can you tell me more about your previous work experience?”
  • A student might say, “I need to start interrogating the text to understand the deeper meaning.”

33. Observing

This is the act of carefully looking at or studying someone or something. It involves paying attention to details and making observations about behavior, patterns, or characteristics.

  • For example, “Scientists spend hours observing animal behavior in the wild.”
  • During a social gathering, someone might comment, “I’ve been observing how people interact with each other in different social situations.”
  • A sports coach might say, “I want you to spend some time observing the opposing team’s playing style before our next game.”

34. Assaying

This refers to the process of examining or testing something to determine its composition, quality, or value. It often involves conducting experiments or tests to obtain data or insights.

  • For instance, “The chemist is assaying the sample to determine its purity.”
  • In a scientific study, researchers might assay a new drug to assess its effectiveness.
  • A financial analyst might say, “I’m currently assaying the market trends to make predictions about future stock prices.”

35. Judging

This is the act of forming an opinion or making a decision based on careful consideration or assessment. It involves weighing the evidence or criteria to determine the value, quality, or worth of something.

  • For example, “The judges are judging the contestants based on their talent and performance.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “Don’t judge a book by its cover; consider the content and context.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’m currently judging the students’ essays based on their organization, grammar, and creativity.”

36. Critiquing

Critiquing refers to the act of carefully examining and evaluating something, often in an analytical or critical manner. It involves providing feedback or criticism to improve or assess the quality of something.

  • For example, a film critic might say, “I will be critiquing the latest blockbuster for the newspaper.”
  • In an art class, a teacher might ask students to critique each other’s artwork to help them improve their skills.
  • A book club member might say, “Let’s critique the characters and plot of the novel during our next meeting.”

37. Chewing over

Chewing over is a slang term used to describe the act of pondering or considering something deeply. It implies taking time to think and reflect on a particular subject or issue.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need some time to chew over whether I should accept the job offer.”
  • During a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “Let’s chew over all the possible solutions before making a decision.”
  • A friend might ask, “What are you chewing over? You seem lost in thought.”
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