Top 64 Slang For Conspicuously – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to blending in seamlessly with the cool kids, knowing the right slang can make all the difference. But what about when you want to stand out, to be seen conspicuously? Our team has got you covered with a list of the trendiest and most eye-catching slang terms for when you want to make a statement. Get ready to upgrade your vocabulary and grab everyone’s attention with these bold expressions!

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1. Blatantly

This word is used to describe something that is done in a very obvious and clear manner, without any attempt to hide it.

  • For example, “He blatantly cheated on the test by looking at his neighbor’s paper.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, someone might say, “The politician was taking bribes blatantly.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “You’re blatantly ignoring the facts here.”

2. Overtly

This term refers to something that is done or expressed in a way that is easily noticeable or understood by others.

  • For instance, “She overtly expressed her disapproval of the new policy during the meeting.”
  • In a conversation about discrimination, someone might say, “The company is overtly favoring male employees for promotions.”
  • A person might comment on a controversial statement, “You’re overtly promoting hate speech here.”

3. Flagrantly

This word is used to describe something that is done in a way that is clearly offensive, wrong, or against the rules, without any attempt to hide it.

  • For example, “He flagrantly violated the terms of his probation.”
  • In a discussion about cheating in sports, someone might say, “The athlete was flagrantly using performance-enhancing drugs.”
  • A person might comment on a news article, “The company flagrantly disregarded safety regulations.”

4. Evidently

This term is used to indicate that something is clearly or obviously true, visible, or understood by others.

  • For instance, “She was evidently upset by his comments.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific discovery, someone might say, “The evidence evidently supports the theory.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “You’re evidently misinterpreting the data here.”

5. Clearly

This word is used to describe something that is done or expressed in a way that is easy to see, hear, understand, or remember.

  • For example, “He clearly explained the instructions to the team.”
  • In a discussion about a presentation, someone might say, “The speaker clearly outlined the main points.”
  • A person might comment on a written article, “The author clearly presented the arguments.”

6. Noticeably

This word is used to describe something that is easily seen or observed. It implies that something is clearly noticeable or stands out.

  • For example, “The celebrity was noticeably absent from the event.”
  • In a discussion about a new hairstyle, someone might say, “You can’t miss her, she has noticeably pink hair.”
  • A person might notice a change in someone’s behavior and comment, “He was noticeably more confident after his promotion.”

7. Prominently

This term is used to describe something that is easily visible or easily noticed. It suggests that something is standing out or is in a prominent position.

  • For instance, “The sign was prominently displayed on the front door.”
  • In a conversation about a book cover, someone might say, “The author’s name is prominently featured at the top.”
  • A person might notice a prominently placed advertisement and comment, “That billboard is hard to miss.”

8. Ostentatiously

This word is used to describe something that is done in a way that is meant to attract attention or impress others. It implies that something is done in an extravagant or showy manner.

  • For example, “She arrived at the party ostentatiously dressed in a designer gown.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s car, a person might say, “He drives around ostentatiously in his flashy sports car.”
  • A person might notice someone showing off their expensive jewelry and comment, “She’s always dressed ostentatiously with her diamond necklace.”

9. Conspicuously

This term is used to describe something that is easily seen or noticed. It suggests that something stands out or is easily observed.

  • For instance, “The bright red car was conspicuously parked in the middle of the street.”
  • In a conversation about a new building, someone might say, “The unique architecture makes it conspicuously different from the surrounding structures.”
  • A person might notice someone wearing a bright yellow outfit and comment, “She was conspicuously dressed in that eye-catching color.”

10. Plainly

This word is used to describe something that is easily seen or understood. It implies that something is obvious or straightforward.

  • For example, “The instructions were plainly written on the package.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s intentions, a person might say, “He plainly stated that he wanted to be in a relationship.”
  • A person might notice someone’s emotions and comment, “She was plainly upset about the situation.”

11. Visibly

This word is used to describe something that is easily seen or noticed. It implies that whatever is being discussed is clearly visible or evident.

  • For example, “He was visibly upset by the news.”
  • In a conversation about a crime scene, someone might say, “There were visibly fresh footprints leading away from the scene.”
  • A teacher might comment, “She was visibly excited when she received her test results.”

12. Patently

This term is used to emphasize that something is obvious or evident. It suggests that there is no doubt or question about the matter at hand.

  • For instance, “His lie was patently obvious to everyone in the room.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific discovery, one might say, “The benefits of this new technology are patently clear.”
  • A person might state, “Her talent is patently evident in her artwork.”

13. Transparently

This word suggests that something is done or presented in a way that is easily understood or seen through. It implies that there is no hidden agenda or deception involved.

  • For example, “The company’s intentions were transparently self-serving.”
  • In a discussion about a politician, someone might comment, “He transparently panders to popular opinion.”
  • A person might say, “The organization operates transparently, with all financial records available for public scrutiny.”

14. Unmistakably

This term indicates that something is so distinct or obvious that it cannot be confused or misunderstood. It suggests that there is no room for doubt or misinterpretation.

  • For instance, “Her handwriting was unmistakably unique.”
  • In a conversation about a famous landmark, someone might say, “The Eiffel Tower is unmistakably recognizable.”
  • A person might state, “His voice is unmistakably deep and resonant.”

15. Palpably

This word is used to describe something that is so evident or obvious that it can be felt or sensed. It suggests that the impact or significance of the matter at hand is readily apparent.

  • For example, “The tension in the room was palpably thick.”
  • In a discussion about a success, someone might comment, “The team’s excitement was palpably contagious.”
  • A person might say, “The loss was palpably devastating for the entire community.”

16. Undeniably

This word is used to emphasize that something is unquestionably true or evident. It indicates that there is no room for doubt or argument.

  • For example, “The evidence against him is undeniably strong.”
  • In a discussion about a talented musician, someone might say, “Her skills on the piano are undeniably impressive.”
  • A reviewer might write, “The movie’s impact on the audience is undeniably powerful.”

17. Decidedly

This word is used to express a strong opinion or certainty about something. It indicates that there is no doubt or hesitation.

  • For instance, “He is decidedly the best player on the team.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “The food there is decidedly delicious.”
  • A person might assert, “She is decidedly the most qualified candidate for the job.”

18. Indisputably

This word is used to emphasize that something cannot be argued or disputed. It indicates that there is no room for disagreement or doubt.

  • For example, “His talent as a painter is indisputably remarkable.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific theory, someone might say, “The evidence supporting it is indisputably strong.”
  • A critic might write, “The book is indisputably a masterpiece of literature.”

19. Unquestionably

This word is used to emphasize that something is beyond doubt or uncertainty. It indicates that there is no room for questioning or hesitation.

  • For instance, “Her beauty is unquestionably breathtaking.”
  • In a conversation about a historical event, someone might say, “The impact it had on society is unquestionably significant.”
  • A person might assert, “He is unquestionably the most talented actor of his generation.”

20. Incontestably

This word is used to emphasize that something cannot be contested or disputed. It indicates that there is no room for argument or doubt.

  • For example, “The team’s victory was incontestably deserved.”
  • In a discussion about a scientific discovery, someone might say, “Its implications are incontestably groundbreaking.”
  • A reviewer might write, “The artist’s talent is incontestably evident in every brushstroke.”

21. Manifestly

When something is manifestly conspicuous, it is easily seen or recognized without any doubt.

  • For example, “The celebrity arrived at the event manifestly dressed in a stunning gown.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, one might say, “The evidence against him was manifestly clear.”
  • A person might comment, “Her talent in singing is manifestly evident in her powerful performances.”

22. Unambiguously

When something is unambiguously conspicuous, it is unmistakably noticeable or evident.

  • For instance, “The suspect’s guilt was unambiguously proven by the DNA evidence.”
  • In a conversation about a bright and colorful painting, one might say, “The artist’s use of bold colors unambiguously catches the viewer’s attention.”
  • A person might remark, “His dedication to his work is unambiguously reflected in the quality of his output.”

23. Conclusively

When something is conclusively conspicuous, it is clearly and decisively noticeable or apparent.

  • For example, “The experiment’s results conclusively proved the hypothesis.”
  • In a discussion about a famous landmark, one might say, “Its grandeur is conclusively seen in its magnificent architecture.”
  • A person might comment, “The team’s victory was conclusively demonstrated by their dominant performance.”

24. Out in the open

When something is out in the open, it is conspicuously visible or easily noticed by anyone.

  • For instance, “The secret was out in the open after someone accidentally mentioned it.”
  • In a conversation about a scandal, one might say, “The politician’s corruption was eventually brought out in the open.”
  • A person might remark, “Their relationship was no longer a secret; it was out in the open for everyone to see.”

25. Loud and proud

When someone is loud and proud about something, they are conspicuously and confidently expressing or showcasing it.

  • For example, “She walked into the room, loud and proud, wearing a shirt with a bold statement.”
  • In a discussion about personal achievements, one might say, “He announced his promotion loud and proud.”
  • A person might comment, “They are loud and proud advocates for equal rights.”

26. In plain sight

This phrase refers to something or someone that is clearly visible or noticeable, without any effort to hide or blend in.

  • For example, “The thief left the stolen goods in plain sight, hoping no one would suspect them.”
  • In a discussion about a hidden object in a movie, someone might say, “It was right there in plain sight the whole time!”
  • A detective might comment, “The suspect was brazen, leaving the evidence out in plain sight for anyone to find.”

27. Front and center

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is placed in a central or prominent position, often to attract attention or be the main focus.

  • For instance, “The speaker stood front and center on the stage, commanding the audience’s attention.”
  • In a group photo, someone might say, “I want to be front and center, right in the middle.”
  • A teacher might ask a student to come to the front and center of the class to present their project.
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28. Bold as brass

This phrase describes someone who is extremely confident and unafraid to stand out or be noticed, often in a way that may be considered audacious or bold.

  • For example, “She walked into the party, bold as brass, wearing a bright red dress while everyone else was in black.”
  • In a discussion about a confident public speaker, someone might say, “He took the stage, bold as brass, captivating the audience with his charisma.”
  • A friend might describe someone they admire as “bold as brass,“bold as brass,” saying, “She always speaks her mind and never apologizes for being herself.”

29. Sticking out like a sore thumb

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is very conspicuous or obvious because it stands out or doesn’t belong in a particular situation.

  • For instance, “In a sea of black suits, his bright orange jacket made him stick out like a sore thumb.”
  • In a discussion about a mismatched item, someone might say, “That painting really sticks out like a sore thumb in this room.”
  • A traveler might comment, “As a foreigner, I stuck out like a sore thumb in that small town.”

30. Standing out like a sore thumb

This phrase is similar to “sticking out like a sore thumb” and is used to describe something or someone that is very conspicuous or obvious because it stands out or doesn’t belong in a particular situation.

  • For example, “Her extravagant outfit made her stand out like a sore thumb among the casual attire at the party.”
  • In a discussion about a unique building, someone might say, “The modern architecture of that skyscraper really stands out like a sore thumb in the historic district.”
  • A teacher might notice a student’s exceptional talent and say, “Your artwork stands out like a sore thumb in the best way possible.”

31. Making a scene

This phrase refers to behaving in a way that attracts a lot of attention, often in a dramatic or disruptive manner.

  • For example, “She was making a scene at the restaurant, yelling and throwing things.”
  • In a movie review, one might write, “The actor’s performance was so powerful, it made a scene.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to make a scene, but this is unacceptable.”

32. Catching the eye

This phrase means to stand out or be noticed by others.

  • For instance, “Her vibrant red dress caught everyone’s eye at the party.”
  • In a marketing campaign, one might say, “We need a catchy slogan that will catch the eye of potential customers.”
  • A person might comment, “The unique architecture of that building really catches the eye.”

33. Standing out from the crowd

This phrase means to be distinct or different from others, making oneself easily noticeable.

  • For example, “His eccentric fashion sense always makes him stand out from the crowd.”
  • In a job interview, one might say, “I believe my experience and skills make me stand out from the crowd of applicants.”
  • A person might comment, “The singer’s powerful voice really makes her stand out from the crowd.”

34. Making a splash

This phrase means to make a noticeable impact or create a significant impression.

  • For instance, “The new product launch made a splash in the industry, attracting a lot of attention.”
  • In a social gathering, one might say, “Let’s make a splash at the party by arriving in style.”
  • A person might comment, “The artist’s bold artwork always makes a splash at exhibitions.”

35. Grabbing the spotlight

This phrase means to attract attention or become the focus of everyone’s attention.

  • For example, “The talented singer grabbed the spotlight with her stunning performance.”
  • In a debate, one might say, “I need to make a strong argument to grab the spotlight and win the audience.”
  • A person might comment, “The politician always tries to grab the spotlight during public events.”

36. Drawing stares

When something or someone is drawing stares, it means they are grabbing the attention of others and causing people to look at them.

  • For example, “Her bold fashion choices always draw stares wherever she goes.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might say, “That guy’s outrageous dance moves are definitely drawing stares.”
  • A person with a unique hairstyle might say, “I like to dye my hair bright colors because it draws stares and starts conversations.”

37. Making heads turn

When something or someone is making heads turn, it means they are capturing the attention of others and causing people to turn their heads to look at them.

  • For instance, “Her stunning beauty made heads turn as she walked into the room.”
  • In a busy street, someone might say, “That street performer’s incredible talent is making heads turn.”
  • A person wearing a flashy outfit might say, “I love wearing this outfit because it always makes heads turn.”

38. Standing out in a crowd

When someone or something is standing out in a crowd, it means they are easily noticeable and distinct from the rest of the people or things around them.

  • For example, “His bright orange jacket made him stand out in the crowd.”
  • In a group photo, someone might say, “Wear something colorful so you can stand out in the crowd.”
  • A person with a unique talent might say, “I always try to stand out in a crowd by showcasing my skills and abilities.”

39. Making a statement

When something or someone is making a statement, it means they are expressing a strong opinion, belief, or message in a clear and impactful way.

  • For instance, “Her protest sign made a powerful statement against injustice.”
  • In a political debate, someone might say, “His passionate speech really made a statement.”
  • A person with a bold fashion sense might say, “I like to wear unconventional outfits to make a statement and challenge societal norms.”

40. Making waves

When something or someone is making waves, it means they are creating a significant impact or attracting a lot of attention, often by challenging the status quo or bringing about change.

  • For example, “Her groundbreaking research on climate change is making waves in the scientific community.”
  • In a social media campaign, someone might say, “Let’s create a hashtag that will make waves and raise awareness about this issue.”
  • A person starting a new business might say, “I hope my innovative product will make waves in the industry and disrupt the market.”

41. Turning heads

When something or someone is so noticeable or impressive that people can’t help but turn their heads to look.

  • For example, “Her stunning dress was turning heads at the party.”
  • A person might say, “That sports car is definitely turning heads as it drives by.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “Bold accessories are a great way to turn heads and make a statement.”

42. Making an entrance

To make a memorable entrance that grabs everyone’s attention.

  • For instance, “She made quite an entrance with her flamboyant outfit and confident stride.”
  • At a party, someone might say, “Watch me make an entrance with this dance routine.”
  • In a theater performance, an actor might plan to make an entrance to surprise the audience.
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43. Showing off

To boast or flaunt something in order to impress others.

  • For example, “He’s always showing off his expensive watch.”
  • A person might say, “Stop showing off and just focus on the task at hand.”
  • In a conversation about achievements, someone might comment, “She’s constantly showing off her academic awards.”

44. Making a grand appearance

To make a striking or memorable entrance that leaves a lasting impression.

  • For instance, “The celebrity made a grand appearance at the red carpet event, turning heads with her extravagant gown.”
  • At a wedding, someone might say, “The bride made a grand appearance, walking down the aisle in a stunning dress.”
  • In a theatrical performance, an actor might plan to make a grand appearance to captivate the audience.

45. Making a big show

To intentionally draw attention to oneself or an event by making it extravagant or dramatic.

  • For example, “He always makes a big show of his birthday celebrations, throwing lavish parties.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t make a big show out of it, just quietly do your work.”
  • In a discussion about public speaking, someone might comment, “Confidence is key to making a big show and captivating the audience.”

46. Making a striking appearance

This phrase refers to someone or something that catches attention or is easily noticed due to their appearance or actions. It implies that the person or thing is visually impressive or remarkable.

  • For example, “She walked into the room making a striking appearance with her bold outfit.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Bold colors and unique patterns can help you make a striking appearance.”
  • A journalist might describe a celebrity as “making a striking appearance on the red carpet.”

47. Making a flashy display

This phrase describes someone or something that is intentionally drawing attention to themselves or their possessions in a showy or extravagant manner. It often implies that the display is meant to impress or gain admiration.

  • For instance, “He arrived at the party in a sports car, making a flashy display.”
  • In a discussion about luxury brands, someone might say, “Their advertising campaigns always feature celebrities making flashy displays of their wealth.”
  • A person might criticize someone else’s behavior by saying, “Stop making a flashy display and just be yourself.”

48. Saliently

This adverb describes something that is noticeable or stands out in a significant or prominent way. It suggests that the person or thing is easily recognized or distinguished.

  • For example, “The bright red sign saliently indicated the location of the store.”
  • In a discussion about a painting, someone might say, “The artist used bold brushstrokes to saliently highlight the focal point.”
  • A news article might describe a key feature of a new product as “saliently differentiating it from its competitors.”
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49. Notably

This adverb signifies that something is worthy of attention or recognition due to its uniqueness, distinctiveness, or exceptional qualities. It suggests that the person or thing stands out from others in a noticeable way.

  • For instance, “The restaurant is notably known for its delicious desserts.”
  • In a conversation about historical figures, someone might say, “Abraham Lincoln is notably remembered for his leadership during the Civil War.”
  • A reviewer might describe a film as “notably well-acted and beautifully shot.”

50. Strikingly

This adverb describes something that is visually or noticeably impressive or attention-grabbing. It suggests that the person or thing stands out due to its unique or distinctive qualities.

  • For example, “The sunset over the ocean was strikingly beautiful.”
  • In a discussion about architecture, someone might say, “The modern building stands out in the cityscape with its strikingly unique design.”
  • A fashion enthusiast might describe an outfit as “strikingly bold and avant-garde.”

51. Boldly

To do something boldly means to do it with confidence and courage, without fear of what others may think or say.

  • For example, “She boldly expressed her opinions during the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to ask my boss for a raise, boldly.”
  • In a discussion about taking risks, someone might say, “You have to step out boldly if you want to achieve your goals.”

52. Distinctly

When something is done distinctly, it is done in a way that is clear and noticeable, making it stand out from the rest.

  • For instance, “She spoke distinctly, making sure everyone understood her.”
  • A person might say, “The aroma of freshly baked bread filled the room distinctly.”
  • In a conversation about art, someone might comment, “His style is distinctly different from other painters.”

53. Loud and clear

Saying something loud and clear means to communicate it clearly and unambiguously, leaving no room for misunderstanding.

  • For example, “He told her, loud and clear, that he never wanted to see her again.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve made my intentions loud and clear, there’s no room for confusion.”
  • In a discussion about communication, someone might say, “To avoid misunderstandings, it’s important to express yourself loud and clear.”

54. Standing out

When something is standing out, it is easily noticeable or distinct from the surrounding environment.

  • For instance, “Her bright red dress made her stand out in the crowd.”
  • A person might say, “His unique hairstyle always makes him stand out.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “Wearing a bold accessory can make you stand out in a sea of plain outfits.”

55. Clearly evident

When something is clearly evident, it is obvious and easily seen or understood.

  • For example, “The smile on her face made her happiness clearly evident.”
  • A person might say, “The impact of climate change is clearly evident in the melting glaciers.”
  • In a discussion about a crime investigation, someone might comment, “The fingerprints left at the scene make the suspect’s presence clearly evident.”

56. Openly visible

When something is openly visible, it means that it is easily seen or noticed without any effort or obstruction.

  • For example, “The bright neon sign was openly visible from miles away.”
  • In a crowded room, you might say, “The celebrity was openly visible among the crowd.”
  • A person might comment, “The evidence was openly visible, proving his guilt.”

57. Boldly apparent

When something is boldly apparent, it means that it is clearly evident or obvious to anyone who sees it.

  • For instance, “Her disappointment was boldly apparent on her face.”
  • If someone is wearing a flashy outfit, you could say, “Her unique style is boldly apparent.”
  • A person might say, “The impact of climate change is boldly apparent in the melting glaciers.”

58. In the limelight

When someone or something is in the limelight, it means that they are in the spotlight or center of attention, often due to their actions or achievements.

  • For example, “The actress was in the limelight after winning the prestigious award.”
  • During a press conference, a politician might say, “I’m stepping into the limelight to address these important issues.”
  • A person might comment, “The new product launch put the company in the limelight.”

59. Staring you in the face

When something is staring you in the face, it means that it is obvious and impossible to ignore, as it is directly in front of you.

  • For instance, “The solution to the problem was staring me in the face the whole time.”
  • If someone is being dishonest, you might say, “The truth is staring you in the face, but you refuse to see it.”
  • A person might comment, “The answer to the riddle was staring us all in the face, but no one could figure it out.”

60. In the public eye

When someone or something is in the public eye, it means that they are under public scrutiny or observation, often due to their fame, status, or actions.

  • For example, “Celebrities are constantly in the public eye and have to be mindful of their actions.”
  • A politician might say, “As a public figure, I understand that my actions are always in the public eye.”
  • A person might comment, “The scandal put the company’s practices in the public eye and led to a loss of trust.”

61. Glaringly

When something is glaringly obvious, it means that it is very clear and stands out prominently.

  • For example, “The mistake in the report was glaringly obvious.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “Her outfit was glaringly mismatched.”
  • A teacher might comment, “The student’s lack of preparation was glaringly evident in their presentation.”

62. Stood out

When something or someone stands out, it means that they are easily seen or noticed because they are different or exceptional in some way.

  • For instance, “His talent for singing really stood out in the competition.”
  • In a conversation about a group of people, someone might say, “She stood out among the crowd because of her bright red hair.”
  • A teacher might say, “The student’s excellent work stood out among their peers.”

63. Unconcealed

When something is unconcealed, it means that it is not hidden or disguised and is easily seen or noticed.

  • For example, “Her disappointment was unconcealed on her face.”
  • In a discussion about a secret, someone might say, “The truth was finally unconcealed.”
  • A detective might describe a crime scene as “unconcealed evidence.”

64. Clearly manifest

When something is clearly manifest, it means that it is clearly evident or obvious.

  • For instance, “The impact of climate change is clearly manifest in the increasing temperatures.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s emotions, someone might say, “Her happiness was clearly manifest in her smile.”
  • A doctor might describe symptoms as “clearly manifest indicators of a certain condition.”