Top 34 Slang For Contained – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the idea of containment in a cool and trendy way, we’ve got you covered. From everyday conversations to social media posts, using the right slang can make a big difference. Get ready to level up your vocabulary with our list of top slang for contained that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with your newfound linguistic skills!

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1. Locked and loaded

This phrase originates from military and law enforcement terminology, referring to a firearm that is loaded and ready to be fired. It has since been adopted in general slang to mean being fully prepared for a situation.

  • For example, a person getting ready for a presentation might say, “I’m locked and loaded with my PowerPoint slides.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I’m locked and loaded for the big game tomorrow.”
  • A person preparing for a job interview might exclaim, “I’m locked and loaded with my resume and talking points!”

2. Bottled up

This phrase is used to describe the act of keeping one’s emotions or thoughts hidden or suppressed. It implies that someone is not expressing their true feelings or opinions.

  • For instance, a person going through a difficult breakup might say, “I’ve been keeping my emotions bottled up.”
  • In a conversation about a sensitive topic, someone might comment, “It’s important not to keep your thoughts bottled up. Speak your mind.”
  • A friend might notice that you seem distant and ask, “What’s been bothering you? It looks like you’ve been bottling something up.”

3. Under wraps

This phrase is used to describe something that is being kept confidential or hidden from public knowledge. It implies that the information or object is being tightly controlled and not easily accessible.

  • For example, a company might say, “We have a new product in development, but the details are still under wraps.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might mention, “Let’s keep the venue under wraps to maintain the element of surprise.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any insider information on the upcoming movie? Is the plot still under wraps?”

4. Zipped up

This phrase is used to describe something that is tightly closed or securely fastened. It implies that there is no chance of anything escaping or getting out.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Make sure your backpack is zipped up before you leave.”
  • In a discussion about food storage, someone might comment, “Keep leftovers in an airtight container, completely zipped up.”
  • A friend might notice that your jacket is unzipped and say, “Hey, your jacket is open. You might want to zip it up to keep warm.”

5. Sealed tight

This phrase is used to describe something that is tightly closed or completely secure, leaving no room for anything to enter or escape. It implies a high level of containment or protection.

  • For example, a person might say, “I made sure to seal the package tight to prevent any leaks.”
  • In a conversation about a confidential document, someone might mention, “We need to keep this information sealed tight until the official announcement.”
  • A person might notice that a container is not properly sealed and say, “Be careful, the jar isn’t sealed tight. It might spoil the contents.”

6. Buttoned up

This slang term refers to something that is tightly closed or sealed. It can also be used to describe someone who is reserved or not openly expressive.

  • For example, “The box was buttoned up tightly to keep its contents secure.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, one might say, “He tends to keep his feelings buttoned up.”
  • Another usage could be, “She buttoned up the secret and didn’t tell anyone.”

7. Capped off

This slang term means to complete or finish something, often in a final or decisive manner.

  • For instance, “He capped off the project with a successful presentation.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, one might say, “Winning the championship capped off an incredible season.”
  • Another usage could be, “She capped off the night with a spectacular performance.”

8. Shut tight

This slang term describes something that is firmly closed or sealed, often to ensure that nothing can enter or escape from it.

  • For example, “The jar was shut tight to preserve the freshness of its contents.”
  • In a conversation about a secure facility, one might say, “The doors are shut tight to prevent unauthorized access.”
  • Another usage could be, “She shut tight the windows to keep out the cold.”

9. Clammed up

This slang term refers to someone becoming quiet or refusing to speak, often due to shyness, nervousness, or a desire to keep information secret.

  • For instance, “He clammed up when asked about his personal life.”
  • In a discussion about communication, one might say, “She clammed up during the interview and didn’t provide much information.”
  • Another usage could be, “The suspect clammed up and refused to answer any questions.”

10. Tucked away

This slang term means to store or place something in a secure or hidden location.

  • For example, “He tucked away his savings in a secret compartment.”
  • In a conversation about organizing, one might say, “She tucked away the files in a drawer.”
  • Another usage could be, “They tucked away the treasure in a hidden cave.”

11. Wrapped up

This slang term is often used to describe the completion of a task or project.

  • For example, “I finally wrapped up my report and submitted it to my boss.”
  • A student might say, “I can’t wait to wrap up this semester and enjoy summer break.”
  • Someone might mention, “I’m almost done wrapping up all the loose ends before going on vacation.”

12. Packed in

This slang term refers to a situation where a space or area is filled to capacity.

  • For instance, “The subway was packed in during rush hour.”
  • A person describing a party might say, “The club was packed in with people dancing and having a good time.”
  • Someone might complain, “I can’t stand being packed in like sardines on a crowded airplane.”

13. Boxed in

This slang term describes a feeling of being trapped or confined in a situation.

  • For example, “I feel boxed in by all the responsibilities and expectations.”
  • A person discussing a difficult decision might say, “I feel like I’m boxed in with no good options.”
  • Someone might mention, “I hate feeling boxed in by societal norms and expectations.”

14. Cooped up

This slang term is often used to describe a feeling of being confined or restricted in movement or activities.

  • For instance, “I’ve been cooped up in my apartment all day due to the bad weather.”
  • A person talking about a long workday might say, “I feel cooped up in my office and need some fresh air.”
  • Someone might mention, “I hate feeling cooped up when I have so much energy and want to be active.”

15. Latched on

This slang term refers to being firmly attached or connected to something or someone.

  • For example, “The dog latched on to the toy and wouldn’t let go.”
  • A person talking about a strong friendship might say, “We’ve been latched on to each other since childhood.”
  • Someone might mention, “I feel like I’m latched on to my phone all the time and need to disconnect.”

16. Cinched in

This phrase refers to being tightly constrained or limited in movement or freedom. It can also imply being under strict control or supervision.

  • For example, “During the lockdown, we felt cinched in and couldn’t go anywhere.”
  • A person discussing a strict diet might say, “I have to keep my cravings cinched in.”
  • Someone might describe a controlling relationship as, “She keeps him cinched in and doesn’t let him socialize much.”

17. Trapped in

This phrase describes the feeling of being stuck or confined in a particular situation or place, unable to escape or break free.

  • For instance, “She felt trapped in a job she hated and couldn’t find a way out.”
  • A person might say, “I feel trapped in this small town, dreaming of bigger opportunities.”
  • Someone describing a bad relationship might say, “He made me feel trapped in a cycle of abuse.”

18. Walled off

This term suggests being separated or cut off from others, either physically or emotionally. It can also imply creating a barrier or boundary to protect oneself.

  • For example, “After the argument, she walled herself off from everyone and refused to talk.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve walled off that painful memory and don’t let it affect me anymore.”
  • Someone describing a gated community might say, “The neighborhood is walled off from the rest of the city for added security.”

19. Kept in check

This phrase refers to being closely monitored or controlled to prevent any excessive or undesirable behavior. It can also imply being restrained or limited in some way.

  • For instance, “The security measures kept the crowd in check during the protest.”
  • A person might say, “I have to keep my emotions in check when dealing with difficult people.”
  • Someone describing a strict teacher might say, “He keeps the students in check by enforcing strict rules.”

20. Pinned down

This term describes being held down or immobilized, unable to move or escape. It can also imply being overwhelmed or unable to make progress in a particular situation.

  • For example, “During the wrestling match, he pinned his opponent down and won the match.”
  • A person might say, “I feel pinned down by my responsibilities and can’t find time for myself.”
  • Someone describing a difficult task might say, “I’m trying to finish this project, but I feel pinned down by all the obstacles.”

21. Enclosed

This term refers to something that is securely shut or sealed, preventing access or escape. It can be used to describe objects or spaces that are contained within a closed area.

  • For example, “The valuable jewelry was enclosed in a safe.”
  • In a discussion about packaging, someone might say, “Make sure the product is properly enclosed in the box.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their emotions, saying, “I felt enclosed in my own thoughts.”

22. Gagged

This slang term refers to the act of preventing someone from speaking or expressing their opinion. It can also be used metaphorically to describe feeling silenced or unable to speak out.

  • For instance, “The government tried to gag the journalist from reporting on the scandal.”
  • In a conversation about censorship, someone might say, “Freedom of speech should never be gagged.”
  • A person might use this term to describe feeling restricted in their ability to speak up, saying, “I felt gagged during the meeting and couldn’t voice my concerns.”

23. Muzzled

Similar to “gagged,” this term refers to the act of preventing someone from speaking or expressing their opinions. It can also be used metaphorically to describe feeling silenced or unable to speak out.

  • For example, “The company muzzled its employees from discussing their working conditions.”
  • In a discussion about media control, someone might say, “News outlets should never be muzzled by government interference.”
  • A person might use this term to describe feeling stifled in their ability to express themselves, saying, “I felt muzzled by societal expectations.”

24. Stashed away

This slang term refers to hiding or concealing something in a secure or secret place. It can be used to describe objects or even money that is kept out of sight or stored away.

  • For instance, “He stashed away his savings in a hidden compartment.”
  • In a conversation about secrets, someone might say, “She stashed away her diary to keep it private.”
  • A person might use this term to describe keeping something valuable or sentimental hidden, saying, “I stashed away my grandmother’s necklace for safekeeping.”

25. Taped up

This term refers to using tape to secure or close something. It can be used to describe objects or packages that are held together or sealed shut using tape.

  • For example, “He taped up the box to ensure it wouldn’t open during shipping.”
  • In a discussion about repairs, someone might say, “I taped up the broken window until I could get it fixed.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a makeshift solution, saying, “I taped up the tear in my backpack to keep my books from falling out.”

26. Tightly wound

This phrase is used to describe someone who is highly stressed or anxious. It implies that the person is tightly wound up, like a spring ready to snap.

  • For example, “She’s always tightly wound and gets easily overwhelmed.”
  • When discussing a friend who is constantly worrying, someone might say, “He’s a bit tightly wound, always thinking about the worst-case scenario.”
  • In a conversation about managing stress, someone might advise, “Try some relaxation techniques to unwind if you’re feeling tightly wound.”

27. Sealed off

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely closed or inaccessible. It implies that there is no way to open or access the item or area.

  • For instance, “The crime scene was sealed off by the police.”
  • When discussing a restricted area, someone might say, “That part of the building is sealed off to the public.”
  • In a conversation about a closed container, someone might mention, “Make sure the lid is sealed off tightly to keep the food fresh.”

28. Tied down

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is restricted or limited in their actions or movements.

  • For example, “I feel tied down by my responsibilities and can’t pursue my dreams.”
  • When discussing a job with strict rules, someone might say, “It’s a tied-down position with little room for creativity.”
  • In a conversation about a relationship, someone might mention, “I don’t want to be tied down right now, I want to explore and have freedom.”

29. Packed away

This phrase is used to describe something that has been stored or hidden away, usually in a container or a specific location.

  • For instance, “I packed away my winter clothes in the attic.”
  • When discussing organizing a room, someone might say, “I need to pack away all these books on the shelf.”
  • In a conversation about moving, someone might mention, “I packed away all my belongings in boxes before the movers arrived.”

30. Stuffed in

This phrase is used to describe something that has been forcefully squeezed or crammed into a tight space.

  • For example, “I stuffed in all my clothes into the suitcase.”
  • When discussing a crowded car, someone might say, “We were all stuffed in like sardines.”
  • In a conversation about organizing a closet, someone might mention, “I stuffed in all the extra blankets on the top shelf to save space.”

31. Shut off

This phrase is used to describe something that has been completely turned off or stopped. It can refer to shutting off a device, closing a valve, or stopping a flow of something.

  • For example, “I shut off the lights before leaving the room.”
  • In a conversation about water conservation, someone might say, “Make sure to shut off the faucet when you’re done.”
  • A mechanic might say, “I shut off the engine to diagnose the problem.”

32. Buttoned down

This phrase is used to describe something that is tightly closed or securely fastened, often referring to clothing or containers. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation or organization that is tightly controlled or regulated.

  • For instance, “She buttoned down her coat to stay warm in the cold weather.”
  • In a discussion about securing luggage, someone might say, “Make sure your suitcase is buttoned down before boarding the plane.”
  • A manager might say, “We need to keep our company policies buttoned down to maintain consistency.”

33. Clamped down

This phrase is used to describe a situation where there is increased control or restriction. It can refer to a government or authority imposing stricter regulations or a person exerting more control over a situation.

  • For example, “The government clamped down on illegal immigration.”
  • In a discussion about controlling expenses, someone might say, “We need to clamp down on unnecessary spending.”
  • A teacher might say, “I had to clamp down on classroom disruptions to maintain a productive learning environment.”

34. Packed off

This phrase is used to describe someone or something being sent away or dispatched, often abruptly or without much preparation. It can refer to physically sending someone off to a different location or figuratively removing someone from a situation.

  • For instance, “He was packed off to boarding school at a young age.”
  • In a conversation about dealing with a difficult person, someone might say, “I packed off my annoying neighbor by pretending to be busy.”
  • A parent might say, “I packed off the kids to their grandparents’ house for the weekend.”
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