Top 55 Slang For Conversation – Meaning & Usage

In today’s fast-paced world, keeping up with the latest slang can be a challenge. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. Whether you’re looking to impress your friends or simply want to stay in the loop, our team has compiled a list of the hottest slang for conversation. From trendy phrases to catchy expressions, we’ve got it all. So, sit back, relax, and get ready to take your conversations to the next level with our comprehensive guide.

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1. What’s up?

This phrase is a casual way to ask someone how they are or what they are currently doing. It is often used as a greeting or conversation starter.

  • For example, you might say, “Hey, what’s up?” when you see a friend.
  • If someone asks you, “What’s up?” you can respond with something like, “Not much, just hanging out.”
  • In a text message, you might send, “Hey, what’s up? Want to grab lunch later?”

2. I feel you

This expression is used to show understanding and empathy towards someone’s situation or feelings. It is often used to validate another person’s emotions.

  • For instance, if a friend tells you they’re tired because they had a long day, you can respond with, “I feel you, I had a busy day too.”
  • If someone shares a personal struggle, you might say, “I feel you, I’ve been through something similar.”
  • In a group conversation, you can use this phrase to show support by saying, “I feel you, we’re all dealing with stress right now.”

3. I get it

This phrase is used to indicate that you understand or comprehend something. It can be used in response to new information or to show that you are following a conversation.

  • For example, if someone explains a complex concept, you can say, “I get it now, thanks for explaining.”
  • If someone asks if you understand their instructions, you can respond with, “Yes, I get it. I’ll follow your directions.”
  • In a discussion, you might say, “I get it, let’s move on to the next topic.”

4. Chill

This word is often used to suggest that someone should relax or calm down. It can also be used to describe a relaxed or easy-going atmosphere.

  • For instance, if someone is getting stressed about a situation, you can say, “Hey, chill. It’s not a big deal.”
  • If someone suggests doing something intense or stressful, you can respond with, “Let’s do something chill instead.”
  • In a casual conversation, you might say, “I’m just chilling at home tonight, no big plans.”

5. Lit

This slang term is used to describe something that is exciting, excellent, or highly enjoyable. It can be used to describe events, experiences, or even people.

  • For example, if you attend a concert and have a great time, you can say, “The concert was lit!”
  • If someone asks how your vacation was, you might respond with, “It was lit, we had so much fun.”
  • In a conversation about a party, you can say, “The party last night was lit, the music was amazing.”

6. No worries

This phrase is used to reassure someone that there is no need to be concerned or upset about a particular situation. It is often used to show understanding and to let someone know that their actions or mistakes are forgiven or not a problem.

  • For example, if someone apologizes for being late, you might respond, “No worries, it happens to everyone.”
  • If someone accidentally spills a drink, you could say, “No worries, I’ll clean it up.”
  • When someone thanks you for a small favor, you might reply, “No worries, happy to help.”

7. Dude

This term is a casual way to refer to a person, typically a male. It is often used to address or refer to someone in a friendly or informal manner.

  • For instance, if you see a friend across the street, you might say, “Hey dude, long time no see!”
  • When talking about a group of friends, you might say, “Me and the dudes are going to the game tonight.”
  • If someone asks, “Who was that guy?” you could respond, “Oh, just some dude I met at the party.”

8. Hang out

This phrase means to spend time with someone in a relaxed and informal way, usually without a specific plan or purpose. It implies a casual and laid-back social gathering or activity.

  • For example, if a friend asks what you’re doing this weekend, you might say, “I’m just planning to hang out with some friends.”
  • When making plans with someone, you might suggest, “Let’s hang out at the park and have a picnic.”
  • If someone asks what you did last night, you could say, “I just hung out with my roommate and watched movies.”

9. Cool

This word is used to express approval, admiration, or agreement. It can be used to describe something as good, impressive, or interesting.

  • For instance, if someone shows you a new painting they made, you might say, “Wow, that’s really cool!”
  • When agreeing with someone’s idea, you could say, “Yeah, that sounds cool. Let’s do it.”
  • If someone asks how your day was, you might respond, “It was cool, nothing too exciting happened.”

10. Bummer

This word is used to describe a situation or event that is disappointing, unfortunate, or not what was expected. It is often used to express sympathy or empathy towards someone experiencing a negative situation.

  • For example, if someone cancels plans at the last minute, you might say, “Oh, that’s a bummer. I was looking forward to hanging out.”
  • When hearing about someone’s bad day, you could say, “Wow, that’s a real bummer. I’m sorry.”
  • If someone tells you they failed a test, you might respond, “That’s a bummer, but I’m sure you’ll do better next time.”

11. Sweet

Used to describe something that is really good or impressive.

  • For example, “That new movie is sweet! You should definitely watch it.”
  • A person might say, “I just got tickets to the concert. It’s going to be sweet!”
  • Someone might comment on a friend’s new car, saying, “Wow, your ride is sweet!”

12. Catch up

To have a conversation with someone to get updated on their recent activities or events.

  • For instance, “Let’s grab coffee and catch up on everything that’s been going on.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while. We should catch up soon!”
  • Someone might ask, “Can we catch up over lunch? I want to hear about your trip.”

13. Lame

Used to describe something that is not exciting or impressive.

  • For example, “That movie was so lame. I fell asleep halfway through.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not going to that party. It sounds lame.”
  • Someone might comment on a dull conversation, saying, “This discussion is getting really lame.”

14. Bro

Used to address or refer to a close friend or buddy.

  • For instance, “Hey bro, do you want to go grab some pizza?”
  • A person might say, “Thanks for helping me out, bro. I owe you one.”
  • Someone might introduce their friend, saying, “This is my bro, we’ve known each other since childhood.”

15. Hella

Used as an intensifier to emphasize something.

  • For example, “That concert was hella good! The band was amazing.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hella tired. I need to get some sleep.”
  • Someone might comment on a challenging task, saying, “This project is hella difficult. It’s going to take a lot of work.”

16. Wanna

A contraction of “want to” commonly used in informal conversation. It expresses the desire or intention to do something.

  • For example, “Do you wanna go grab some dinner?”
  • A friend might ask, “Wanna catch a movie later?”
  • Someone might say, “I wanna travel the world someday.”

17. Gonna

A contraction of “going to” commonly used in informal conversation. It expresses the future action or plan.

  • For instance, “I’m gonna go for a run after work.”
  • A person might say, “We’re gonna have a great time at the party.”
  • Someone might ask, “What are you gonna do this weekend?”

18. Sick

Used to describe something that is impressive, excellent, or exciting.

  • For example, “That skateboard trick was sick!”
  • A person might say, “I just got tickets to the concert, it’s gonna be sick.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “This new video game is sick!”

19. YOLO

An acronym that encourages living life to the fullest and taking risks because life is short. It is often used to justify impulsive or adventurous behavior.

  • For instance, “I’m gonna try skydiving, YOLO!”
  • A person might say, “I quit my job and booked a one-way ticket to travel the world, YOLO.”
  • Someone might use it as a reminder, “Life’s too short to worry about what others think, YOLO!”

20. Dope

Used to describe something that is impressive, stylish, or of high quality.

  • For example, “That new song is dope!”
  • A person might say, “Check out my new sneakers, they’re so dope.”
  • Someone might comment, “The special effects in that movie were really dope.”

21. Chillin’

This term is used to describe a state of relaxation or casually spending time with friends. It implies a laid-back and carefree attitude.

  • For example, if someone asks what you’re doing, you might respond, “Just chillin’ at home.”
  • When making plans, you might say, “Let’s chill at the park this weekend.”
  • A friend might ask, “Want to come over and chill for a bit?”

22. Sup

Short for “What’s up?”, this slang term is used as a casual greeting to ask someone how they are or what they are doing.

  • For instance, you might say, “Hey, sup?” when you see a friend.
  • If someone asks you what’s new, you might reply, “Not much, just sup.”
  • A text conversation might start with, “Sup? Haven’t talked in a while.”

23. Chit-chat

This term refers to light and informal conversation. It is often used to describe small talk or friendly banter.

  • For example, you might engage in chit-chat with a coworker while waiting for a meeting to start.
  • When catching up with a friend, you might say, “Let’s grab coffee and have a chit-chat.”
  • A person might comment, “I enjoy chit-chatting with strangers on long bus rides.”

24. Small talk

Small talk refers to casual and non-intimate conversation about general topics. It is often used as a way to break the ice or fill awkward silences.

  • For instance, at a networking event, you might engage in small talk by asking about someone’s job or hobbies.
  • When meeting someone for the first time, you might start with small talk about the weather or current events.
  • A person might say, “I’m not a fan of small talk. I prefer deeper conversations.”

25. Banter

Banter refers to light-hearted and playful conversation that involves teasing, joking, or friendly competition.

  • For example, friends might engage in banter while playing a game or watching a sports match.
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “The banter in here is hilarious!”
  • A person might comment, “I love bantering with my siblings. It keeps things fun and lively.”

26. Shoot the breeze

This slang phrase means to engage in casual conversation or chat in a relaxed manner. It is often used when there is no specific topic or agenda for the conversation.

  • For example, “Let’s grab a coffee and shoot the breeze.”
  • During a lunch break, coworkers might say, “We had some time to shoot the breeze and relax.”
  • A group of friends hanging out might say, “We spent the whole afternoon shooting the breeze at the park.”

27. Chew the fat

This slang phrase means to have a friendly and leisurely conversation. It is often used when people want to catch up or have a relaxed chat.

  • For instance, “Let’s meet up and chew the fat over lunch.”
  • Two old friends might say, “We spent hours chewing the fat about our childhood memories.”
  • During a family gathering, someone might say, “We always love to chew the fat and share stories.”

28. Rap

In this context, “rap” means to talk or converse with someone. It can be used to describe any type of conversation, whether casual or deep.

  • For example, “Let’s sit down and have a rap about our plans for the weekend.”
  • During a business meeting, someone might say, “We need to rap about the new project.”
  • Friends catching up might say, “We had a great rap about life and our goals.”

29. Gossip

Gossip refers to the act of discussing rumors or personal information about others. It is often used when people want to share or inquire about the latest news or stories.

  • For instance, “I heard some juicy gossip about our neighbor. Do you want to know?”
  • A group of friends might say, “Let’s get together and gossip about the latest celebrity scandals.”
  • During a break at work, coworkers might say, “Have you heard any interesting gossip lately?”

30. Chat

The word “chat” is a commonly used slang term for engaging in casual conversation. It can be used in various contexts and settings.

  • For example, “Let’s grab a coffee and have a chat.”
  • Two friends catching up might say, “We had a long chat about our recent travels.”
  • During a virtual meeting, someone might say, “Let’s open the floor for a chat and address any questions or concerns.”

31. Jabber

Jabber is used to describe someone who talks quickly and incoherently. It often implies that the person is speaking without thinking or without making much sense.

  • For example, “He just jabbered on about his day, without giving me a chance to respond.”
  • In a discussion about a confusing topic, one might say, “I couldn’t understand a word he was jabbering about.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Stop jabbering and listen to what I’m saying!”

32. Natter

Natter refers to casual or idle conversation. It implies a relaxed and informal discussion, often about unimportant or trivial matters.

  • For instance, “We sat on the porch, nattering about the weather.”
  • In a group of friends catching up, one might say, “We spent the afternoon nattering about our lives.”
  • A person might dismiss a gossip-filled conversation as, “Just a bunch of mindless nattering.”

33. Yap

Yap is used to describe someone who talks incessantly and often in a high-pitched or annoying manner. It can also imply that the person is talking without much substance or relevance.

  • For example, “She just yapped on and on about her new shoes.”
  • In a discussion about a chatty coworker, one might say, “I can’t focus with her constant yapping.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t stand his yap during movies.”

34. Blabber

Blabber refers to someone who talks without thinking, often revealing information that should be kept private or confidential. It can also imply that the person is speaking in a foolish or nonsensical manner.

  • For instance, “He blabbered about his secret project, not realizing he was being overheard.”
  • In a discussion about a gossip, one might say, “She’s always blabbering about other people’s business.”
  • A person might describe a rambling speech as, “Just a bunch of blabber.”

35. Prattle

Prattle describes someone who talks incessantly and often in a foolish or inconsequential manner. It implies that the person is speaking without much thought or substance.

  • For example, “She prattled on about her weekend, without realizing no one was listening.”
  • In a discussion about a boring lecture, one might say, “The professor prattled on for hours.”
  • A person might dismiss a long and pointless conversation as, “Just a lot of prattle.”

36. Gab

Gab is a slang term for engaging in light and informal conversation. It often refers to friendly and relaxed discussions.

  • For instance, friends might get together and gab about their day.
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “Let’s grab a cup of coffee and gab for a while.”
  • A person might comment, “I love to gab with my grandma. She always has interesting stories to share.”

37. Jibber-jabber

Jibber-jabber is a term used to describe nonsensical or rambling speech. It refers to conversation that lacks clarity or coherence.

  • For example, a person might say, “Stop jibber-jabbering and get to the point.”
  • In a heated argument, one might accuse the other of “spouting jibber-jabber.”
  • A frustrated listener might comment, “I can’t understand a word of his jibber-jabber.”

38. Chinwag

Chinwag is a slang term for a casual and enjoyable conversation. It implies a relaxed and friendly exchange of thoughts and ideas.

  • For instance, friends might get together for a chinwag over a cup of tea.
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “Let’s have a chinwag about the latest movies.”
  • A person might comment, “I had a great chinwag with my neighbor. We talked about everything from books to travel.”

39. Cackle

Cackle is a slang term used to describe loud and infectious laughter. It often refers to laughter that is boisterous and uncontrollable.

  • For example, a person might say, “Her joke made the whole room cackle.”
  • In a funny situation, someone might comment, “I couldn’t help but cackle at that hilarious video.”
  • A person might describe their own laughter as a “loud and joyful cackle.”
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40. Tittle-tattle

Tittle-tattle is a slang term for gossip or idle conversation. It refers to talking about trivial or unimportant matters, often in a gossipy or critical manner.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I don’t have time for tittle-tattle. I prefer meaningful conversations.”
  • In a group setting, someone might comment, “Let’s avoid tittle-tattle and focus on more productive topics.”
  • A person might complain, “I’m tired of all the tittle-tattle in the office. It’s distracting and unprofessional.”

41. Schmooze

To schmooze is to engage in friendly, casual conversation or small talk. It often involves making connections or building relationships in a social or professional setting.

  • For example, at a networking event, someone might say, “I’m going to schmooze with the attendees and make some new contacts.”
  • In a business context, a manager might encourage employees to schmooze with clients to build rapport.
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s go to the party and schmooze with some interesting people.”

42. Converse

To converse is to engage in conversation or discussion with someone. It implies a back-and-forth exchange of ideas, opinions, or information.

  • For instance, at a dinner party, guests might converse about various topics such as politics or current events.
  • In a classroom, students might be asked to converse with each other to practice their language skills.
  • A person might say, “I enjoy conversing with people from different cultures to learn about their perspectives.”

43. Yak

To yak is to talk or chat informally with someone. It often implies a casual or lighthearted conversation.

  • For example, friends might yak about their weekend plans or gossip about the latest news.
  • At a coffee shop, two people might yak about their favorite movies or TV shows.
  • A person might say, “Let’s grab a cup of coffee and yak about life.”

44. Dialogue

A dialogue refers to a conversation or discussion between two or more people. It involves an exchange of ideas, opinions, or information.

  • For instance, in a movie, the dialogue between characters drives the plot forward.
  • In a therapy session, the therapist and client engage in a dialogue to explore thoughts and emotions.
  • A teacher might encourage students to participate in a dialogue to foster critical thinking.
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45. Exchange words

To exchange words is to engage in a verbal argument or disagreement with someone. It implies a heated or confrontational conversation.

  • For example, two coworkers might exchange words over a disagreement about a project.
  • In a sports game, players from opposing teams might exchange words on the field.
  • A person might warn, “Don’t mess with him, or you’ll end up exchanging words.”

46. Have a chinwag

This phrase means to have a casual conversation or chat with someone.

  • For example, “Let’s have a chinwag over a cup of coffee.”
  • Two friends catching up might say, “We need to have a proper chinwag soon.”
  • In a work setting, colleagues might say, “Let’s have a quick chinwag to discuss the project.”

47. Have a natter

To have a natter means to engage in a light-hearted and informal conversation with someone.

  • For instance, “We sat on the porch and had a good natter.”
  • Friends catching up might say, “Let’s grab a drink and have a proper natter.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we all have a natter and get to know each other?”

48. Have a heart-to-heart

Having a heart-to-heart means to have a sincere and intimate conversation with someone, usually to discuss personal feelings or issues.

  • For example, “We had a heart-to-heart about our relationship.”
  • Two close friends might say, “I think it’s time we have a heart-to-heart and clear the air.”
  • In a family setting, a parent might suggest, “Let’s have a heart-to-heart talk with the kids about their behavior.”

49. Have a powwow

Having a powwow refers to holding a meeting or discussion, usually to exchange ideas or make decisions.

  • For instance, “Let’s have a powwow to brainstorm ideas for the project.”
  • Colleagues planning an event might say, “We should have a powwow to finalize the details.”
  • In a team setting, a leader might suggest, “Let’s have a quick powwow to address any concerns or questions.”

50. Have a tête-à-tête

Having a tête-à-tête means to have a private and intimate conversation with someone.

  • For example, “They went to a secluded spot to have a tête-à-tête.”
  • Two friends catching up might say, “Let’s have a tête-à-tête and catch up on everything.”
  • In a romantic setting, a couple might suggest, “We need to have a tête-à-tête about our future together.”

51. Have a gabfest

This phrase is used to describe a conversation that is animated, enthusiastic, and often lengthy. It implies a sense of enjoyment and camaraderie among the participants.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s have a gabfest over coffee this weekend.”
  • During a family gathering, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we have a gabfest and catch up on each other’s lives?”
  • In a workplace setting, colleagues might plan to have a gabfest during lunch break to discuss a project or share ideas.
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52. Have a yarn

This phrase is often used to describe a friendly and informal conversation. It conveys a sense of storytelling or sharing anecdotes in a laid-back manner.

  • For instance, two friends might say, “Let’s grab a drink and have a yarn about our recent adventures.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we have a yarn and share funny stories from our past?”
  • During a road trip, travelers might engage in a yarn to pass the time and entertain each other.

53. Have a chat

This phrase is a simple and commonly used way to suggest having a conversation. It can refer to any type of discussion, from light-hearted chit-chat to more serious topics.

  • For example, friends might say, “Let’s have a chat over lunch and catch up on what’s been happening.”
  • In a professional setting, colleagues might arrange to have a chat to discuss work-related matters.
  • A parent might ask their child, “Can we have a chat about your grades?”

54. Have a gossip

This phrase is used to describe a conversation that involves sharing and discussing information or rumors about other people. It often implies a sense of curiosity or interest in the personal lives of others.

  • For instance, friends might say, “Let’s have a gossip and talk about the latest celebrity news.”
  • In a small community, neighbors might have a gossip to catch up on local happenings.
  • Colleagues might engage in a gossip during a break to discuss office gossip or rumors.

55. Have a debate

This phrase refers to a conversation that involves presenting arguments, counterarguments, and supporting evidence on a particular topic. It implies a more structured and organized discussion.

  • For example, students might have a debate in a classroom setting to practice critical thinking and persuasive skills.
  • In a political context, candidates might have a debate to present their viewpoints and engage in a discussion.
  • Friends might have a debate about a controversial topic to exchange different perspectives and challenge each other’s ideas.