Top 53 Slang For Copying Someone – Meaning & Usage

We’ve all encountered those moments when someone imitates our every move, leaving us feeling frustrated and annoyed. But did you know that there’s a whole range of slang terms to describe this act of copying? From mimicry to apeing, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang for copying someone. So whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or simply want to better understand these playful (or sometimes irritating) behaviors, this article has got you covered. Get ready to dive into the world of imitation and discover the perfect term to describe those copycats in your life!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Bite

To “bite” someone means to copy or imitate their style, idea, or work without giving credit. The term is often used in the context of art, music, or fashion.

  • For example, a critic might say, “That artist totally bit Picasso’s style.”
  • A friend might jokingly accuse another friend of biting their outfit, saying, “Nice try, but you’re biting my look.”
  • In a discussion about plagiarism, someone might warn, “Don’t bite someone else’s work, it’s not original.”

2. Copy-cat

A “copy-cat” is someone who mimics or imitates another person’s actions, behavior, or mannerisms. The term is often used to describe someone who lacks originality.

  • For instance, a teacher might scold a student, saying, “Stop being a copy-cat and come up with your own ideas.”
  • A friend might playfully tease another friend, saying, “You’re such a copy-cat, always doing what I do.”
  • In a discussion about originality, someone might comment, “It’s important to be authentic and not just be a copy-cat.”

3. Imitation

To “imitate” someone means to recreate or mimic their actions, behavior, or style. It can be seen as a form of flattery or a lack of originality, depending on the context.

  • For example, a comedian might imitate a famous celebrity’s voice and mannerisms for comedic effect.
  • A fashion enthusiast might try to imitate a celebrity’s outfit, saying, “I love her style, so I’m going to imitate it.”
  • In a discussion about artistic inspiration, someone might argue, “There’s nothing wrong with imitation as long as it leads to innovation.”

4. Knocking off

To “knock off” someone’s work or product means to copy or imitate it, often with the intention of selling it as a cheaper or unauthorized version. The term is commonly used in the context of counterfeit goods.

  • For instance, a designer might accuse another brand of knocking off their popular handbag design.
  • A consumer might warn others, saying, “Be careful, those sunglasses are knock-offs.”
  • In a discussion about intellectual property, someone might argue, “Knocking off someone’s work is illegal and unethical.”

5. Jock

To “jock” someone means to copy or imitate their style or behavior without fully understanding or appreciating it. The term is often used to describe someone who blindly follows trends or tries to fit in.

  • For example, a music fan might accuse someone of jocking a particular artist without truly appreciating their music.
  • A friend might tease another friend, saying, “You’re just jocking the latest fashion trend, aren’t you?”
  • In a discussion about individuality, someone might argue, “Don’t be a jock, be yourself and embrace your unique style.”

6. Squelch

To squelch means to imitate or copy someone’s behavior or actions. It is often used to describe someone who mimics another person’s style or mannerisms.

  • For example, “She always squelches her older sister’s fashion choices.”
  • In a group of friends, one might say, “Stop squelching me and find your own identity.”
  • A person might jokingly accuse someone of squelching by saying, “Nice squelch! Where did you get that idea?”

7. Clap Back

To clap back means to respond to someone’s criticism or insult with a sharp or witty comeback. It is a way of copying someone’s negative comments and turning them around.

  • For instance, if someone insults your outfit, you might clap back by saying, “At least I have style, unlike you.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might clap back with, “You think you’re so smart? Well, I’ve got news for you.”
  • A person might encourage someone to clap back by saying, “Don’t let them get away with that. Clap back and show them who’s boss.”

8. Flex

To flex means to show off or boast about one’s accomplishments, possessions, or abilities. It is a way of copying someone’s behavior of flaunting their achievements.

  • For example, “He always flexes his expensive watch whenever he gets the chance.”
  • In a conversation about achievements, someone might say, “I don’t mean to flex, but I just got promoted.”
  • A person might comment on someone else’s show-off behavior by saying, “Why does she always feel the need to flex on social media?”

9. Mimic

To mimic means to copy someone’s actions, speech, or behavior, often for comedic effect or to mock them. It is a way of directly copying someone’s mannerisms or traits.

  • For instance, a comedian might mimic a famous celebrity’s voice and gestures for a comedic skit.
  • In a playful interaction, one person might mimic another person’s accent or way of speaking.
  • A person might comment on someone’s imitative behavior by saying, “Why do you always have to mimic everything I do?”

10. Parrot

To parrot means to mindlessly repeat someone else’s words or actions without understanding their meaning. It is a way of copying someone’s speech or behavior without adding any originality.

  • For example, “He just parrots what his favorite politician says without thinking for himself.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might parrot the exact words of the teacher without fully grasping the concept.
  • A person might criticize someone’s lack of originality by saying, “Stop being a parrot and come up with your own ideas.”

11. Mirror

To imitate or mimic someone’s actions, behavior, or style. “Mirror” is a slang term used to describe the act of copying someone.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Why are you mirroring everything I do?”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might comment, “I noticed you’ve been mirroring the boss’s presentation style.”
  • Someone might jokingly say, “Are you trying to mirror my fashion sense?”

12. Emulate

To imitate someone with the intention of matching or surpassing their abilities or achievements. “Emulate” is a slang term often used to describe the act of copying someone in order to achieve similar success.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’m trying to emulate my older brother’s academic success.”
  • In the world of sports, a young athlete might aspire to emulate their favorite professional athlete.
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to emulate their work ethic and dedication.”

13. Ditto

A term used to indicate agreement or similarity. “Ditto” is a slang term that can be used to describe copying someone’s actions or statements.

  • For example, if someone says, “I’m going to the beach,” another person might respond, “Ditto!”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I love her style. Ditto on that outfit.”
  • A person might comment, “Whenever she gets a new phone, I have to get the same one. Ditto syndrome, I guess.”

14. Mirror-image

A term used to describe something that is an exact copy or replica of something else. “Mirror-image” is a slang term often used to describe copying someone’s actions or appearance exactly.

  • For instance, if someone says, “She’s like a mirror-image of her mother,” it means they look and act very similar.
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, someone might say, “Her outfit is a mirror-image of what was popular in the 90s.”
  • A person might comment, “He’s trying to create a mirror-image of his favorite celebrity’s lifestyle.”

15. Replicate

To create an exact or close copy of something. “Replicate” is a slang term used to describe the act of copying someone or something precisely.

  • For example, a chef might try to replicate a famous recipe.
  • In the world of art, an artist might attempt to replicate a famous painting.
  • A person might say, “I want to replicate her success in my own career.”

16. Clone

To clone someone means to imitate them exactly, often in a mocking or sarcastic way.

  • For example, “She’s always cloning her older sister’s style.”
  • A friend might say, “Stop cloning me, it’s getting annoying.”
  • In a joking manner, someone might say, “I’m going to clone your dance moves at the party tonight.”

17. Copycat

A copycat is someone who imitates another person’s actions or style without adding any originality.

  • For instance, “He’s such a copycat, always wearing the same clothes as me.”
  • A sibling might complain, “Stop being a copycat and come up with your own ideas.”
  • In a playful way, someone might say, “You’re a copycat, but at least you have good taste.”

18. Knock off

To knock off someone means to replicate or copy their work or ideas, often without permission or credit.

  • For example, “He knocked off her design and claimed it as his own.”
  • A coworker might say, “I can’t believe he knocked off my presentation.”
  • In a negative context, someone might say, “She’s always knocking off other people’s work instead of coming up with her own ideas.”

19. Repeat

To repeat someone means to reproduce or imitate their words or actions.

  • For instance, “He’s always repeating what I say, it’s so annoying.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please don’t repeat what I just said, try to come up with your own answer.”
  • In a sarcastic way, someone might say, “Oh, look who’s repeating my jokes now.”

20. Echo

To echo someone means to reflect or imitate their words or sentiments.

  • For example, “He echoed her sentiment about the importance of education.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m just echoing what you said, I agree with you.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “I echo the concerns raised by the previous speaker.”

21. Mime

To mime is to imitate or copy someone’s actions or movements without speaking. It often involves exaggerated gestures or facial expressions.

  • For example, a person might mime the act of climbing a ladder without actually using a ladder.
  • In a theater performance, a mime artist might use their body and facial expressions to create the illusion of being trapped in a box.
  • A group of friends might play a game of charades and one person might mime the action of brushing their teeth.
See also  Top 21 Slang For Self Esteem – Meaning & Usage

22. Impersonate

To impersonate is to imitate or copy someone’s behavior, appearance, or voice in order to pretend to be that person. It is often done for entertainment purposes.

  • For instance, an actor might impersonate a famous celebrity in a comedy sketch.
  • During Halloween, someone might dress up and impersonate a well-known character from a movie.
  • A skilled impressionist might impersonate various celebrities and politicians during a live performance.

23. Caricature

A caricature is an exaggerated imitation or representation of someone’s features, behavior, or personality. It often involves emphasizing certain traits or characteristics for humorous or satirical effect.

  • For example, a cartoonist might create a caricature of a politician, exaggerating their facial features or mannerisms.
  • A comedian might perform a comedic routine where they imitate various celebrities in a caricatured manner.
  • In a political cartoon, a caricature might be used to mock or criticize a public figure.

24. Monkey see, monkey do

The phrase “monkey see, monkey do” is a slang expression that refers to mindlessly imitating or copying someone’s actions, often without understanding the reason behind them.

  • For instance, if a child sees their parent doing something, they might mindlessly imitate it without understanding why.
  • In a group setting, one person might start a trend or behavior, and others might mindlessly follow along, like monkeys imitating each other.
  • The phrase can also be used to criticize someone for blindly following or copying others without thinking for themselves.

25. Xerox

To xerox is a slang term that means to make a direct copy or reproduction of something, often without adding any originality or creativity.

  • For example, if someone takes a photograph of a painting and then prints out an exact replica, they might say they xeroxed the painting.
  • In a business context, if someone takes someone else’s idea or proposal and presents it as their own without any changes, it can be described as xeroxing.
  • The term can also be used more generally to describe the act of copying or imitating something without adding any unique elements.

26. Shadow

When someone shadows another person, they are imitating or copying their actions or behavior. This term can also refer to closely following or monitoring someone’s movements.

  • For example, “She always shadows her older sister and copies everything she does.”
  • In a workplace setting, a new employee might shadow a more experienced colleague to learn the ropes.
  • A detective might say, “I need to shadow the suspect to gather more evidence.”

27. Follow suit

To follow suit means to imitate or copy someone’s actions or decisions, especially when they have been successful or influential. The term originated from card games where players are required to play a card of the same suit as the one previously played.

  • For instance, “After seeing her friend start a business, she decided to follow suit and become an entrepreneur too.”
  • In a fashion context, someone might say, “I loved her outfit so much, I decided to follow suit and buy the same dress.”
  • A student might say, “Many of my classmates joined the debate club, so I decided to follow suit and join as well.”

28. Carbon copy

A carbon copy refers to an exact duplicate or replica of something. In the context of copying someone, it means imitating their actions or behavior to the point of being almost identical.

  • For example, “She is a carbon copy of her older sister, they even have the same mannerisms.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “He created a presentation that was a carbon copy of his competitor’s.”
  • A teacher might say, “I can tell you copied your essay, it’s a carbon copy of one I read last year.”

29. Xerox machine

The term “Xerox machine” is often used metaphorically to refer to someone who copies or imitates others. It originates from the brand name Xerox, which is a well-known manufacturer of photocopiers.

  • For instance, “He is always imitating others, he’s like a Xerox machine.”
  • In a creative industry, someone might say, “I hate working with him, he’s just a Xerox machine, always copying other people’s ideas.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Stop being a Xerox machine and come up with your own style.”

30. Photocopy

To photocopy someone means to replicate their actions or behavior. The term originates from the process of making copies using a photocopier.

  • For example, “She always photocopies her boss’s work style and tries to emulate it.”
  • In a school setting, a student might say, “I’m going to photocopy her study habits, she always gets top grades.”
  • A colleague might say, “He’s just photocopying the manager’s management style, he doesn’t have any original ideas.”

31. Reflect

To closely imitate or copy someone’s actions, behavior, or style. “Reflect” is a slang term used to describe the act of copying someone.

  • For example, if someone starts using a new catchphrase and their friend starts using it too, they might say, “Stop reflecting me!”
  • In a group of friends, one might playfully tease another by saying, “You’re always reflecting whatever I do.”
  • A person might accuse someone of reflecting their fashion choices by saying, “You’re totally reflecting my style today.”

32. Duplicate

To recreate or replicate something exactly. “Duplicate” is a slang term often used to describe the act of copying someone or something.

  • For instance, if someone copies another person’s artwork, they might be called a “duplicate.”
  • In a conversation about plagiarism, one might say, “Copying someone’s work is not only unethical, it’s a complete duplicate of their ideas.”
  • A person might jokingly accuse their friend of duplicating their outfit by saying, “Nice duplicate, we’re twinning!”

33. Xerox copy

To make a direct copy of something, often referring to using a Xerox machine. “Xerox copy” is a slang term used to describe the act of copying someone or something.

  • For example, if someone takes someone else’s idea and presents it as their own, they might say, “They just made a xerox copy of my work.”
  • In a discussion about intellectual property, one might say, “Making a xerox copy of someone’s invention is a violation of their rights.”
  • A person might accuse someone of making a xerox copy of their presentation by saying, “You didn’t even change a single slide, it’s a xerox copy!”

34. Parody

To imitate or mimic someone or something in a humorous or satirical way. “Parody” is a slang term used to describe the act of copying someone or something with the intention of creating a humorous or exaggerated version.

  • For instance, if someone recreates a famous movie scene with a comedic twist, it can be called a “parody.”
  • In a conversation about viral videos, one might say, “That parody of the music video is hilarious!”
  • A person might create a parody of a popular song with new lyrics to make a funny version.
See also  Top 22 Slang For Mosquito – Meaning & Usage

35. Impostor

A person who pretends to be someone else and copies their actions, behavior, or style. “Impostor” is a slang term used to describe someone who is copying someone else in a deceptive or fraudulent way.

  • For example, if someone starts dressing and acting like a popular celebrity to gain attention, they might be called an “impostor.”
  • In a discussion about identity theft, one might say, “The impostor stole my online persona and started copying my posts.”
  • A person might warn their friend about someone who is trying to befriend them by saying, “Be careful, that person is an impostor trying to copy your life.”

36. Mirror image

This term refers to creating a duplicate or exact copy of something or someone. It suggests that the copy is so identical to the original that it appears as a mirrored image.

  • For example, if someone dresses in the same outfit as their friend, they might say, “I’m going for the mirror image look.”
  • In a playful context, a person imitating their friend’s gestures might say, “Watch me do the mirror image of you.”
  • A photographer might use the term to describe a perfectly symmetrical photo, saying, “I captured a beautiful mirror image of the landscape.”

37. Xerox paper

This term refers to the act of making a copy of a document or image using a Xerox machine. It has become a slang term for copying something in general.

  • For instance, if someone replicates a friend’s drawing, they might say, “I made a Xerox paper of your artwork.”
  • In an office setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you make a Xerox paper of this report for me?”
  • A student might say, “I forgot to bring my textbook, can I make a Xerox paper of yours?”

38. Imitate

This term refers to replicating someone’s actions, behavior, or style. It implies trying to mimic or emulate the characteristics of another person.

  • For example, if someone starts speaking with a British accent after watching a British TV show, they might say, “I’m imitating the accent.”
  • In a theater class, a student might be asked to imitate a famous actor’s performance.
  • A comedian might say, “I love imitating celebrities, it always gets a laugh.”

39. Emulation

This term refers to the act of imitating or copying someone, often with the intention of matching their level of success or achievement.

  • For instance, if someone starts a successful business, others might try to emulate their strategies and methods to achieve similar success.
  • In a sports context, a young athlete might say, “I look up to LeBron James and want to emulate his skills.”
  • A student might say, “I’m studying the works of famous writers to improve my writing through emulation.”

40. Mirror effect

This term refers to the phenomenon of imitating or copying someone’s behavior, style, or actions to the extent that it creates a mirror-like reflection of the original.

  • For example, if someone starts using the same catchphrases as their friend, they might say, “I’m creating a mirror effect of your language.”
  • In a dance performance, two dancers might synchronize their movements to create a mirror effect.
  • A fashion trendsetter might say, “I love seeing people wearing clothes that create a mirror effect of my style.”

41. Shadowing

Shadowing refers to closely observing and imitating someone’s actions or behavior. It can be used to learn from someone or to mock them.

  • For example, a new employee might shadow their supervisor to learn the ropes of the job.
  • In a comedic context, one person might shadow another to exaggerate their mannerisms and make fun of them.
  • A student might shadow a successful classmate to understand their study habits and improve their own performance.
See also  Top 0 Slang For Endless – Meaning & Usage

42. Photocopying

Photocopying is the act of making a duplicate copy of a document or image using a photocopier.

  • For instance, a secretary might say, “I’ll be photocopying these reports for the meeting.”
  • In a school setting, a student might say, “Can I borrow your notes? I need to photocopy them.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a photocopy of that contract? I need to keep a copy for my records.”

43. Mime artist

A mime artist is someone who uses body movements and gestures to imitate actions or convey meaning without speaking.

  • For example, “The mime artist on the street corner was mimicking the actions of passersby.”
  • In a theater performance, a mime artist might use exaggerated gestures to portray a character or tell a story.
  • A person might say, “She’s such a good mime artist, you can understand what she’s trying to convey without words.”

44. Xerox machine operator

A Xerox machine operator is someone who operates a Xerox machine to make copies of documents or images.

  • For instance, “The Xerox machine operator is responsible for maintaining the machine and ensuring quality copies.”
  • In an office setting, a person might ask, “Can you call the Xerox machine operator? I need help with my copy.”
  • A job listing might state, “Looking for an experienced Xerox machine operator to join our team.”

45. Echoing

Echoing refers to the act of repeating someone’s words or ideas, often without adding anything new or original.

  • For example, “She kept echoing the teacher’s answers during the class discussion.”
  • In a meeting, one person might say, “I feel like we’re just echoing each other’s opinions without making any progress.”
  • A person might comment, “It’s annoying when someone just echoes what you said instead of contributing their own thoughts.”

46. Photocopy paper

This term refers to someone who mimics or imitates another person’s actions or behavior, much like how a photocopy machine reproduces a document. It can be used to describe someone who lacks originality or creativity.

  • For example, “She’s like photocopy paper, always copying what others do.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Stop being photocopy paper and start being yourself.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You’re the photocopy paper to my originality.”

47. Impersonation

Impersonation is the act of imitating or pretending to be another person, often for entertainment or deceitful purposes. It can be used to describe someone who copies another person’s identity or mannerisms.

  • For instance, “He’s really good at impersonation, he can mimic anyone’s voice.”
  • During a comedy show, a performer might say, “Now, I will do an impersonation of a famous celebrity.”
  • A detective might say, “We suspect the suspect was using impersonation to gain access to sensitive information.”

48. Xerox copycat

This term combines the brand name “Xerox,” a popular photocopy machine, with the slang term “copycat.” It refers to someone who closely imitates or copies another person’s actions, style, or behavior.

  • For example, “She’s such a Xerox copycat, always wearing the same clothes as her favorite celebrity.”
  • A friend might say, “You’re a Xerox copycat, you even talk like him!”
  • In a creative industry, someone might say, “We need to come up with original ideas, not just be Xerox copycats.”

49. Parrot-like

This term compares someone to a parrot, a bird known for mimicking sounds and words. It describes someone who mindlessly repeats or imitates another person’s words or phrases without understanding their meaning.

  • For instance, “He’s so parrot-like, always repeating what others say without thinking.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Stop being parrot-like and express your own opinion.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Don’t just be parrot-like, try to understand the concepts and explain them in your own words.”

50. Jack

This term is a slang term for copying or imitating someone’s actions or behavior. It can be used to describe someone who mimics another person’s style or mannerisms.

  • For example, “He’s always jacking my style, wearing the same clothes as me.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Stop jacking her moves and come up with your own.”
  • A friend might playfully say, “You’re such a jack, always trying to be like me.”

51. Plagiarize

Plagiarizing refers to the act of using someone else’s work, ideas, or words without giving proper credit or permission. It is a form of intellectual theft.

  • For example, a student might be accused of plagiarizing if they submit an essay that they copied from an online source without citing it.
  • In the world of journalism, plagiarism is a serious offense that can lead to a loss of credibility for the writer.
  • A writer might warn others, “Be careful not to plagiarize, as it can have severe consequences.”

52. Regurgitate

Regurgitating means to repeat information or ideas without fully understanding them or adding any original thoughts.

  • For instance, a student might regurgitate information from a textbook without actually comprehending the material.
  • In a creative writing class, a teacher might encourage students to avoid regurgitating clichés and instead come up with fresh ideas.
  • A critic might say, “The author’s writing style feels like regurgitated ideas from other famous authors.”

53. Steal thunder

To steal someone’s thunder means to take credit for someone else’s idea, achievement, or moment of glory.

  • For example, if a colleague presents a brilliant idea in a meeting, and you repeat it as your own, you are stealing their thunder.
  • In a sports context, a player who scores a goal right after their teammate scores steals their thunder.
  • A friend might playfully say, “Hey, don’t steal my thunder! I was just about to share my exciting news.”