Top 50 Slang For Cost – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about costs and expenses, there’s a whole new language out there that can leave you feeling lost. But fear not, our team has scoured the depths of slang to bring you a list of the most popular and trendy terms used to talk about costs. Get ready to up your slang game and navigate the world of expenses like a pro with our comprehensive guide.

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1. Fee

A fee is a payment or charge for a service or privilege. It is often an amount of money that is paid in exchange for a specific service or access to something.

  • For example, “There is an application fee of $50 for this program.”
  • A person might say, “I had to pay a fee to access the premium features of this app.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might mention, “The hotel charges a resort fee that covers access to the pool and other amenities.”

2. Expense

An expense refers to the amount of money that is spent on something or the cost of a particular item or service. It is often used to describe the money that needs to be paid in order to acquire or maintain something.

  • For instance, “Rent is a major expense for most people.”
  • A person might say, “I need to budget for my monthly expenses.”
  • In a conversation about personal finance, someone might mention, “Reducing expenses can help save money.”

3. Outlay

An outlay refers to the act of spending money or the amount of money that is spent on something. It is often used to describe a significant or substantial expenditure.

  • For example, “The initial outlay for starting a business can be quite high.”
  • A person might say, “I made a large outlay for this new computer.”
  • In a discussion about home renovations, someone might mention, “The outlay for remodeling the kitchen was worth it in the end.”

4. Worth

Worth refers to the monetary or non-monetary value of something. It is often used to describe the importance or usefulness of something in relation to its cost or price.

  • For instance, “This antique vase is worth a lot of money.”
  • A person might say, “This book is worth reading.”
  • In a conversation about investments, someone might mention, “It’s important to consider the potential worth of a stock before investing.”

5. Spend

To spend refers to the act of using money to purchase goods or services. It is often used to describe the action of giving money in exchange for something.

  • For example, “I spent a lot of money on clothes during the sale.”
  • A person might say, “I need to spend less and save more.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might mention, “I’m planning to spend my vacation in Europe.”

6. Tariff

A tariff is a tax or duty imposed on imported goods. It is a way for governments to regulate trade and protect domestic industries.

  • For example, “The government imposed a 25% tariff on steel imports.”
  • In a discussion about international trade, someone might say, “Tariffs can lead to higher prices for consumers.”
  • A business owner might complain, “The new tariffs are hurting our bottom line.”

7. Dues

Dues refer to regular payments or fees that members of an organization or club are required to pay. It is a way to cover the costs of operating the organization.

  • For instance, “I need to pay my monthly dues to the gym.”
  • In a conversation about joining a professional association, someone might ask, “What are the annual dues?”
  • A member of a social club might say, “I forgot to pay my dues for this month.”

8. Levy

A levy is a tax or charge that is imposed by a government or authority. It is typically used to fund specific projects or services.

  • For example, “The city council approved a levy on property owners to fund road repairs.”
  • In a discussion about government spending, someone might argue, “We need to reduce the number of levies on taxpayers.”
  • A business owner might complain, “The new levy on business licenses is putting a strain on small businesses.”

9. Fare

Fare refers to the cost of transportation, such as a bus, train, or taxi ride. It is the amount of money a passenger needs to pay to travel.

  • For instance, “The fare for a subway ride is $2.50.”
  • In a conversation about traveling, someone might ask, “What’s the fare for a round-trip ticket?”
  • A commuter might complain, “The fare keeps increasing every year.”

10. Sticker price

Sticker price refers to the original selling price of a product or service. It is the price that is listed on the sticker or tag.

  • For example, “The sticker price for the car is $30,000.”
  • In a discussion about negotiating prices, someone might say, “Don’t be afraid to negotiate, even if the sticker price is high.”
  • A shopper might comment, “I always look for items with discounted sticker prices.”

11. Investment

An investment refers to the act of putting money into something with the expectation of future returns. It can also refer to the item or asset that is being invested in.

  • For example, “I’m considering making an investment in the stock market.”
  • A person might say, “Real estate can be a great long-term investment.”
  • Another might advise, “Before making an investment, do thorough research and consider the risks involved.”

12. Bottom line

The term “bottom line” is used to refer to the final and most important result or outcome. It is often used in the context of financial matters to emphasize the overall profit or loss.

  • For instance, “The bottom line is that we need to increase our sales.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the bottom line and find ways to cut costs.”
  • A financial advisor might explain, “At the end of the day, the bottom line is what determines the success of a business.”

13. Pricetag

A pricetag refers to the amount of money that something costs. It is often used to emphasize the value or cost of an item or service.

  • For example, “I was shocked by the pricetag on that luxury car.”
  • A person might say, “The pricetag for that vacation package is a bit steep.”
  • Another might comment, “I always check the pricetag before deciding to buy something.”

14. Payout

A payout refers to a sum of money that is paid out, especially as a result of an investment or insurance claim. It can also refer to the act of making such a payment.

  • For instance, “The insurance company provided a generous payout for the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping for a big payout from my investments.”
  • Another might discuss, “The lottery winner received a lump sum payout.”

15. Check

The term “check” is often used to refer to the bill or amount owed for goods or services. It can also be used more broadly to refer to any form of payment or financial transaction.

  • For example, “Can you bring us the check, please?”
  • A person might say, “I need to write a check to pay for the repairs.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you accept checks as payment?”

16. Budget

A budget is a financial plan that outlines an individual or organization’s income and expenses over a certain period of time. It helps to track and manage expenses and ensure that spending is within one’s means.

  • For example, “I need to create a budget to save money for my vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m on a tight budget this month, so I can’t go out to eat.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any budget-friendly recipe ideas?”

17. Rate

In the context of cost, “rate” refers to the price or cost of a particular item or service. It is often used to inquire about the cost of something or to discuss pricing.

  • For instance, “What’s the rate for a one-hour massage?”
  • A person might negotiate, “Can you give me a better rate for this product?”
  • Another might say, “I can’t afford the high rate for that hotel.”

18. Finances

“Finances” refers to one’s overall financial situation, including income, expenses, savings, and investments. It encompasses the management and understanding of money.

  • For example, “I need to get my finances in order and start saving.”
  • A person might say, “I’m struggling with my finances right now.”
  • Another might seek advice, “How can I improve my personal finances?”

19. Dent

In slang terms, a “dent” refers to a financial setback or unexpected expense that negatively impacts one’s finances. It can be used to describe a situation where one’s financial stability is compromised.

  • For instance, “That car repair put a dent in my savings.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to recover from a financial dent.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful not to make any big financial dents.”

20. Bill

In the context of cost, a “bill” refers to an invoice or statement of charges for goods or services provided. It is a request for payment.

  • For example, “I received the bill for my medical expenses.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you split the bill with me?”
  • Another might say, “I need to pay my utility bills by the end of the week.”

21. Spendings

This term refers to the money that is spent or paid out. It is often used to describe the cost of various items or services.

  • For example, “I need to track my spendings to see where my money is going.”
  • In a budgeting discussion, someone might say, “Cutting back on unnecessary spendings can help save money.”
  • A person might ask, “What are your monthly spendings on groceries?”

22. Pocket pinch

This phrase is used to describe something that is costly or requires a significant amount of money to purchase.

  • For instance, “That new designer bag is definitely a pocket pinch.”
  • In a conversation about travel expenses, someone might say, “Visiting that destination is going to be a pocket pinch.”
  • A person might comment, “Eating out every night can be a pocket pinch.”

23. Price point

This term refers to the specific price or cost range at which a product or service is offered for sale.

  • For example, “The new smartphone is available at a higher price point than its predecessor.”
  • In a discussion about luxury goods, someone might mention, “The brand’s products are known for their high price points.”
  • A person might ask, “What is the price point for this item?”

24. Remittance

This term refers to the act of sending money or making a payment, often to a person or organization in another location.

  • For instance, “He sent a remittance to his family back home.”
  • In a conversation about international transactions, someone might say, “Remittances play a significant role in the economy.”
  • A person might ask, “What is the process for making a remittance?”

25. Expenditure

This term refers to the act of spending money or using resources, typically for a specific purpose or on specific items.

  • For example, “She carefully tracks her monthly expenditures to stay within her budget.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might mention, “Reducing unnecessary expenditures can help increase savings.”
  • A person might comment, “Housing and transportation are often the largest expenditures for most people.”

26. Outgoings

This refers to the money spent or costs incurred by an individual or organization. “Outgoings” is a term commonly used in financial contexts to describe the various expenses that need to be paid.

  • For example, “I need to calculate my monthly outgoings to see if I can afford a new car.”
  • A business owner might say, “Managing outgoings is crucial for maintaining profitability.”
  • In a budgeting discussion, someone might mention, “Reducing outgoings can help save money and increase savings.”

27. Overhead

These are the ongoing expenses that a business incurs to keep its operations running. “Overhead” typically includes expenses like rent, utilities, and salaries that are necessary for the business to function.

  • For instance, “The company’s overhead costs have increased due to rising rent prices.”
  • A business owner might say, “Reducing overhead is a key strategy for improving profitability.”
  • In a financial analysis, someone might mention, “High overhead can be a burden on small businesses.”

28. Charge

This refers to the amount of money that is required or asked for a product or service. “Charge” is a common term used to describe the cost that a seller sets for their goods or services.

  • For example, “The charge for a cup of coffee at this café is $5.”
  • A customer might ask, “What’s the charge for a haircut at this salon?”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “I’m willing to pay a lower charge for this item.”

29. Costing

This term refers to the process of determining or calculating the expenses or costs associated with a particular project or endeavor. “Costing” is often used in business or project management contexts to assess the financial feasibility of a plan.

  • For instance, “We need to start costing the new product development to determine its profitability.”
  • A project manager might say, “Accurate costing is essential for budgeting purposes.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might mention, “We should consider the costing before proceeding with this project.”

30. Exchequer

This term refers to the funds or financial resources of a government or organization. “Exchequer” is a formal term often used in the context of national or public finances.

  • For example, “The exchequer has allocated a certain amount of funds for infrastructure development.”
  • A financial analyst might discuss, “The impact of government decisions on the exchequer.”
  • In a news report, someone might mention, “The exchequer is facing a deficit due to increased spending.”

31. Ledger

In slang terms, “ledger” refers to the total amount of money spent or owed. It is often used to discuss personal or business expenses.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to check my ledger before making any more purchases.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, a person might ask, “How can I reduce my ledger and save more money?”
  • A business owner might review their ledger and say, “We need to cut costs in order to improve our profit margins.”

32. Dime

In slang, “dime” is used to refer to ten dollars. It is commonly used in the United States to describe a specific amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I paid a dime for that cup of coffee.”
  • In a conversation about prices, a person might ask, “How much does that shirt cost? A dime?”
  • A friend might borrow money and promise to pay back “a dime” at a later date.
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33. Buck

In slang, “buck” is a term used to refer to one dollar. It is a common term in the United States and is often used when discussing prices or costs.

  • For example, someone might say, “I only have a few bucks in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about a purchase, a person might ask, “How much does that cost? Ten bucks?”
  • A friend might owe you money and say, “I’ll pay you back two bucks next week.”

34. Grand

In slang, “grand” is used to refer to one thousand dollars. It is commonly used in the United States and is a way to describe a large sum of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just spent a grand on a new laptop.”
  • In a conversation about savings, a person might ask, “How can I save up a grand by the end of the month?”
  • A friend might borrow money and promise to pay back “a grand” within a specific timeframe.

35. Stack

In slang, “stack” is used to refer to one thousand dollars. It is often used to describe a stack of bills or a large sum of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a stack from my last paycheck.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, a person might ask, “How much did you spend? A stack?”
  • A friend might boast about their savings and say, “I’ve got a stack saved up for emergencies.”

36. G

In slang, “G” refers to “grand,” which is a term for one thousand dollars. It is often used to describe a high cost or a large sum of money.

  • For example, “That new TV is gonna cost you a few Gs.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t afford that vacation, it’s gonna be several Gs.”
  • In a discussion about expensive cars, someone might comment, “That sports car is worth over 100 Gs.”

37. C-note

A “C-note” is a slang term for a one hundred-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to the value of money or the cost of something.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw a couple of C-notes from the bank.”
  • A person might say, “That designer handbag is worth a few C-notes.”
  • In a conversation about saving money, someone might mention, “I managed to save up a few C-notes for emergencies.”

38. Fiver

A “fiver” is a slang term for a five-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to the value of money or the cost of something relatively inexpensive.

  • For example, “Can you lend me a fiver? I forgot my wallet.”
  • A person might say, “I bought this book for just a fiver.”
  • In a discussion about affordable meals, someone might mention, “You can get a decent lunch for a fiver.”

39. Ten-spot

A “ten-spot” is a slang term for a ten-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to the value of money or the cost of something.

  • For instance, “I found a ten-spot on the ground, lucky me!”
  • A person might say, “I paid a ten-spot for this concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might mention, “I try to keep my daily expenses under ten-spots.”

40. Fin

A “fin” is a slang term for a five-dollar bill. It is often used to refer to the value of money or the cost of something relatively inexpensive.

  • For example, “I need a fin to pay for parking.”
  • A person might say, “I bought this used book for just a fin.”
  • In a discussion about affordable snacks, someone might mention, “You can get a bag of chips for a fin.”

41. Sawbuck

This term refers to a ten-dollar bill. It originates from the resemblance of the Roman numeral X (representing ten) to the crossed legs of a sawbuck, which is a type of sawhorse.

  • For example, “I paid a sawbuck for that concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I only have a sawbuck left in my wallet.”
  • A person discussing a good deal might say, “I got this shirt for just a sawbuck.”

42. Double

This slang term is used to refer to a two-dollar bill. It is called “double” because it represents double the value of a one-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I found a double in my pocket, I thought they were rare!”
  • In a discussion about currency, someone might say, “I wish they would bring back the double.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a double?”

43. Half a grand

This phrase is used to describe a cost of five hundred dollars. It is a casual way of referring to a significant amount of money without using specific dollar amounts.

  • For example, “I spent half a grand on that new phone.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I need to save up half a grand for my vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe they charged half a grand for those concert tickets.”

44. Benji

This term refers to a one-hundred-dollar bill. It is derived from the image of Benjamin Franklin, who appears on the front of the bill.

  • For instance, “I just found a Benji in my coat pocket!”
  • In a discussion about money, someone might say, “I need to withdraw a few Benjis from the bank.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a Benji? I’ll pay you back next week.”

45. Grant

This slang term is used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill. It is named after Ulysses S. Grant, who appears on the front of the bill.

  • For example, “I only have a Grant left in my wallet.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might say, “I can’t afford that, it’s gonna cost me a Grant.”
  • A person might say, “I found a Grant on the ground, lucky me!”

46. Jackson

This refers to a twenty-dollar bill, named after President Andrew Jackson who is featured on the bill. The term “Jackson” is often used to discuss the cost or value of something.

  • For example, “That new video game console costs two Jacksons.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not willing to spend three Jacksons on a concert ticket.”
  • In a conversation about expensive restaurants, someone might comment, “That place will cost you four Jacksons for a meal.”

47. Spendy

This is a slang term used to describe something that is costly or has a high price. It can be used to express surprise or frustration at the cost of something.

  • For instance, “Wow, that designer handbag is really spendy!”
  • A person might say, “I didn’t realize how spendy it would be to go on vacation.”
  • In a discussion about housing prices, someone might comment, “The real estate market in this city is incredibly spendy.”

48. Pricy

This is a slang term used to describe something that is expensive or has a high price. It is similar in meaning to “spendy” and can be used interchangeably.

  • For example, “I didn’t expect the hotel to be so pricy.”
  • A person might say, “Eating out every night can get really pricy.”
  • In a conversation about buying a new car, someone might comment, “The luxury models are definitely pricy.”

49. Spendthrift

This is a slang term used to describe someone who spends money extravagantly or wastefully. It is often used in a negative context to criticize someone’s spending habits.

  • For instance, “My brother is such a spendthrift, he’s always buying expensive gadgets.”
  • A person might say, “I need to be careful with my budget, I don’t want to be a spendthrift.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, someone might comment, “Being a spendthrift is the fastest way to drain your savings.”

50. Debit

While not exclusive to slang for cost, “debit” can be used in the context of discussing the cost or amount of money owed for a purchase or expense. It refers to a reduction in a person’s bank account balance due to a transaction.

  • For example, “I paid for the groceries with my debit card.”
  • A person might say, “I need to check my debit balance before making any more purchases.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might comment, “I try to avoid using my debit card for unnecessary expenses.”