Top 20 Slang For Crime – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the world of crime, the language used can be as mysterious as the acts themselves. Join us as we unravel the underworld of criminal slang and bring you a list of terms that will leave you feeling like a seasoned detective. From the streets to the courtrooms, we’ve got you covered with the top slang for crime. Get ready to delve into a world where words hold power and secrets are unveiled.

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1. Cap

In slang, “cap” is often used as a verb meaning to shoot someone. It can also be used as a noun to refer to a bullet.

  • For example, a gangster in a movie might say, “I’m gonna cap that snitch.”
  • In a news report about a shooting, a headline might read, “Man found dead, shot in the cap.”
  • A person discussing gun violence might say, “We need to address the issue of capping in our communities.”

2. Boost

To “boost” something means to steal it. This term is often used when referring to shoplifting or stealing small items.

  • For instance, a teenager might say, “I boosted a candy bar from the store.”
  • In a conversation about theft, someone might ask, “Have you ever boosted anything before?”
  • A news article about shoplifting might use the headline, “Local shoplifter caught in the act of boosting merchandise.”

3. Heist

A “heist” is a planned and organized robbery, typically involving a group of criminals. It often implies a high-stakes theft, such as a bank robbery or a theft of valuable items.

  • For example, a movie might be titled, “The Great Heist,” referring to a major robbery.
  • In a discussion about famous crimes, someone might mention, “The heist at the museum was one of the most daring thefts in history.”
  • A news report might describe a recent heist as, “A group of masked individuals orchestrated a heist at a jewelry store, making off with millions of dollars worth of diamonds.”

4. Jack

“Jack” is slang for stealing or robbing someone or something. It can also be used as a noun to refer to a thief.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I jacked that guy’s wallet when he wasn’t looking.”
  • In a conversation about crime, a person might ask, “Have you ever been jacked before?”
  • A news report might use the headline, “Local resident jacked at gunpoint in broad daylight.”

5. Caper

A “caper” is a term used to describe a criminal act or a daring escapade. It often implies a sense of adventure or excitement.

  • For example, a movie might be titled, “The Great Caper,” referring to a thrilling crime story.
  • In a discussion about criminal activities, someone might say, “I’ve heard stories of some wild capers pulled off by professional thieves.”
  • A news article might describe a recent caper as, “A group of cunning criminals executed a daring caper, leaving investigators baffled.”

6. Job

In the context of crime slang, a “job” refers to a robbery or heist. It can be used to describe any criminal act that involves stealing or taking something illegally.

  • For example, a gang member might say, “We pulled off a big job last night, got away with a lot of cash.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “This looks like the work of a professional. It’s definitely a job.”
  • A news headline might read, “Brazen daylight job shocks local community.”

7. Score

In crime slang, “score” refers to a successful theft or criminal act. It can also be used more broadly to describe any successful achievement or accomplishment.

  • For instance, a thief might say, “I scored big last night, got away with some valuable jewelry.”
  • In a conversation about criminal activities, someone might ask, “Have you ever pulled off a big score?”
  • A journalist reporting on a high-profile heist might write, “The thieves scored a massive haul worth millions of dollars.”

8. Hit

In crime slang, a “hit” refers to an assault or murder, typically ordered or carried out by a criminal organization or individual. It can also be used to describe any targeted attack or act of violence.

  • For example, a mobster might say, “I want you to take out a hit on that guy. He’s causing trouble.”
  • In a crime documentary, a detective might discuss a high-profile hit and say, “This was a professional job, definitely a hit.”
  • A news report might mention, “The victim was found dead, the result of a brutal hit.”

9. Stick-up

A “stick-up” refers to a robbery or hold-up, typically involving the use of a weapon to intimidate or threaten the victim. It can also be used to describe any act of robbery or theft.

  • For instance, a witness might say, “I saw a stick-up at the convenience store last night. The robber had a gun.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “He’s a professional at stick-ups, always gets away clean.”
  • A news report might state, “The suspect is wanted in connection with a series of stick-ups in the area.”

10. Racket

In crime slang, a “racket” refers to an illegal business or operation, often controlled by organized crime. It can also be used to describe any fraudulent or illegal scheme.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We’ve been investigating a racket involving counterfeit goods.”
  • In a discussion about criminal activities, someone might say, “He’s involved in all sorts of rackets, from drugs to gambling.”
  • A news report might mention, “The police cracked down on a major racket, arresting several key players.”

11. Grift

To deceive or swindle someone, usually for personal gain. “Grift” is a slang term used to describe a scam or a con job.

  • For example, a person might say, “He tried to grift me out of my money with a fake investment opportunity.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might warn, “Be careful of those emails asking for your bank information. It’s a grift.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “He’s always looking for the next grift to pull off.”

12. Pinch

To be taken into custody by law enforcement. “Pinch” is a slang term used to describe being arrested.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He got pinched for shoplifting.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might mention, “The police made a lot of pinches last night.”
  • A character in a book might say, “I’ve been in and out of the pinch so many times, I’ve lost count.”

13. Rip-off

To cheat or deceive someone by charging them too much money or providing them with a low-quality product or service. “Rip-off” is a slang term used to describe a scam or an unfair deal.

  • For example, a person might say, “That store is a rip-off. They charge way too much for their products.”
  • In a discussion about consumer protection, someone might warn, “Watch out for online rip-offs. Always do your research before making a purchase.”
  • A character in a TV show might exclaim, “I can’t believe I fell for that rip-off! I should have known better.”

14. Stick

To steal from someone, usually by using force or intimidation. “Stick” is a slang term used to describe a robbery.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He stuck up the convenience store last night.”
  • In a discussion about crime prevention, someone might suggest, “Stay safe by avoiding high-crime areas where stick-ups are more likely.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I’ve been sticking fools up since I was a teenager.”

15. Whack

To murder someone, usually as part of a criminal act. “Whack” is a slang term used to describe a killing or an assassination.

  • For example, a person might say, “He got whacked by the mob for crossing them.”
  • In a discussion about true crime, someone might mention, “The victim was whacked in a drive-by shooting.”
  • A character in a book might say, “He’s a hitman who’s been whacking people for years.”

16. Knock-over

To steal something by using force or threats of violence. “Knock-over” is a slang term for robbery, often used to describe a quick and unplanned theft.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Convenience store knocked over in broad daylight.”
  • A witness to a robbery might say, “I saw two guys knock-over the jewelry store and make a quick getaway.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might plan a knock-over of a bank to get rich quick.
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17. Jobbery

Engaging in dishonest or fraudulent activities, especially in a position of power or authority. “Jobbery” is a slang term for corruption, often used to describe the abuse of power for personal gain.

  • For instance, a news report might uncover a case of jobbery within a government agency.
  • A person discussing politics might say, “Jobbery is a serious issue that undermines the trust of the public.”
  • In a conversation about business ethics, someone might argue, “We need to root out jobbery and promote transparency in corporate practices.”

18. Knockover

To steal or rob something, typically in a quick and unexpected manner. “Knockover” is a slang term for theft, often used to describe a swift and opportunistic act of stealing.

  • For example, a witness might report, “I saw a guy knockover the parked car and take off with the valuables.”
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might say, “Petty knockovers like shoplifting contribute to the overall statistics.”
  • A detective investigating a series of burglaries might refer to them as knockovers.

19. Shakedown

To obtain money or other benefits through force, intimidation, or threats. “Shakedown” is a slang term for extortion, often used to describe the act of coercing someone into giving up money or valuables.

  • For instance, a victim might say, “I was a victim of a shakedown by a local gang.”
  • In a conversation about organized crime, someone might mention, “Shakedowns are a common tactic used by mobsters to control businesses.”
  • A news report might cover a case of a politician involved in a shakedown scandal.

20. Swindle

To deceive or cheat someone out of money or valuables through deceit or trickery. “Swindle” is a slang term for fraud, often used to describe a deliberate act of deception for financial gain.

  • For example, a person might say, “I got swindled by a smooth-talking salesman who sold me a fake product.”
  • In a discussion about online scams, someone might warn, “Be careful of websites that promise huge returns. They might be trying to swindle you.”
  • A news report might cover a case of a celebrity being swindled out of their fortune by a con artist.
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