Top 65 Slang For Critical – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing dissatisfaction or disapproval, sometimes regular words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for critical comes in. From sarcastic quips to colorful expressions, we’ve rounded up the most creative and hilariously accurate terms to help you navigate the world of criticism with style. Join us as we dive into this listicle and discover the perfect slang to express your critical thoughts.

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1. Goat

This term is used to describe someone or something that is considered the best in a particular field or category. It is often used to praise exceptional talent or achievements.

  • For example, in sports, Michael Jordan is often referred to as the “GOAT” for his basketball skills.
  • A music fan might say, “Beyoncé is the GOAT of modern pop music.”
  • When discussing movies, someone might argue, “The Godfather is the GOAT of crime films.”

2. Basic

This term is used to describe someone or something that is perceived as lacking originality or individuality. It is often used to mock trends or behaviors that are considered common or predictable.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She’s so basic, she only listens to mainstream music.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, a person might comment, “Wearing leggings as pants is such a basic look.”
  • A social media user might make fun of someone’s generic posts by saying, “Your Instagram feed is so basic.”

3. Ghosted

This term is used to describe when someone suddenly stops responding to messages or calls, effectively ending a relationship or conversation without any explanation or closure.

  • For example, a person might say, “I thought we were getting along, but then he ghosted me.”
  • In a discussion about online dating, someone might share, “I’ve been ghosted by so many people on Tinder.”
  • A person might ask for advice by saying, “Should I confront him about ghosting me, or just move on?”

4. Receipts

This term is used to refer to concrete evidence or proof of something, often used in the context of disputes or arguments.

  • For instance, in a conversation about a rumor, someone might say, “Do you have any receipts to back up your claims?”
  • A person might ask for receipts by saying, “Show me the receipts before I believe you.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, someone might say, “I’ve done my research and I have the receipts to support my argument.”

5. Bingeable

This term is used to describe a TV show or series that is so compelling and engaging that it can be watched for long periods of time without getting bored.

  • For example, a person might say, “Stranger Things is such a bingeable show, I finished the entire season in one weekend.”
  • In a discussion about streaming platforms, someone might recommend a show by saying, “It’s highly bingeable, you won’t be able to stop watching.”
  • A TV critic might describe a show as “perfectly bingeable,“perfectly bingeable, with each episode ending on a cliffhanger.”

6. Hangry

This term is used to describe the feeling of being irritable or angry due to hunger. It combines the words “hungry” and “angry” to convey the intensity of the emotion.

  • For example, “I haven’t eaten all day and I’m getting hangry.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t talk to me when I’m hangry, I need food.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might post, “Hangry is a dangerous state of being. Approach with caution.”

7. Lit

This slang term is used to describe something that is exciting, cool, or amazing. It can refer to a party, event, or even a person’s appearance.

  • For instance, “That concert last night was so lit!”
  • A person might say, “Her outfit is on point, she looks lit.”
  • In a social media post, someone might write, “Just had the most lit weekend with my friends.”

8. Savage

This slang term is used to describe someone who is fearless or brutally honest. It can also refer to an action or statement that is bold or ruthless.

  • For example, “She’s a savage, she always speaks her mind.”
  • A person might say, “That comeback was savage, they really put him in his place.”
  • In a discussion about a competitive sport, someone might comment, “He played with a savage intensity, never backing down.”

9. Thirsty

This term is used to describe someone who is desperate for attention or affection, often in a romantic or sexual context. It can also refer to someone who is overly eager or desperate for something.

  • For instance, “He’s always commenting on her posts, he’s so thirsty.”
  • A person might say, “She’s constantly seeking validation, she’s so thirsty.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might post, “When you’re thirsty for a snack and find a bag of chips in your bag.”

10. Extra

This slang term is used to describe someone or something that is excessive or over the top. It can refer to someone who goes above and beyond what is expected or necessary.

  • For example, “She always has to make a grand entrance, she’s so extra.”
  • A person might say, “Why does he have to make such a big deal out of everything? He’s so extra.”
  • In a social media post, someone might write, “When you have a full face of makeup just to go to the grocery store, you’re extra.”

11. FOMO

This term is used to describe the anxiety or unease that one feels when they believe they are missing out on an exciting or interesting event or experience. It is often used in the context of social media and the fear of not being included in a particular activity or gathering.

  • For example, a person might say, “I couldn’t go to the party and I have serious FOMO right now.”
  • Another person might post on social media, “Everyone is going to the concert tonight and I have major FOMO.”
  • A friend might tease, “You should have come to the beach with us, you’re definitely experiencing FOMO now.”

12. YOLO

This phrase is used to convey the idea of living life to the fullest and taking risks because life is short and should be enjoyed. It is often used as a justification for impulsive or adventurous behavior.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m going skydiving tomorrow because YOLO!”
  • Another person might post on social media, “Just booked a spontaneous trip to Bali because YOLO.”
  • A friend might encourage, “Come on, let’s try that new extreme sport together. YOLO, right?”

13. Squad

This term refers to a close-knit group of friends or associates. It is often used to describe a group that is supportive, loyal, and spends a lot of time together.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my squad tonight.”
  • Another person might post a photo on social media with their friends and caption it, “My squad is the best!”
  • A friend might introduce their group of friends by saying, “This is my squad, we’ve been tight since high school.”

14. Bae

This term is used as a shortened form of the word “babe” or “baby” and is used to refer to a romantic partner or someone you have strong feelings for. It is often used as a term of endearment.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I love spending time with my bae.”
  • Another person might post a cute photo of their significant other on social media and caption it, “Date night with my bae.”
  • A friend might tease, “You and your bae are so adorable together.”

15. Trolling

This term refers to the act of deliberately provoking or harassing others online, often in a playful or mischievous manner. Trolling can involve posting inflammatory or controversial comments with the intention of getting a reaction from others.

  • For example, a person might say, “Don’t take that comment seriously, they’re just trolling.”
  • Another person might post a sarcastic or controversial statement on social media and comment, “Just trolling, don’t get worked up.”
  • A friend might warn, “Be careful not to engage with trolls, they thrive on attention.”

16. Facepalm

This term is used to express frustration, disbelief, or disappointment in someone’s actions or words. It typically involves placing one’s palm on their face in exasperation or embarrassment.

  • For example, if someone says something incredibly ignorant, you might respond with a facepalm.
  • A person might facepalm when they witness someone making a mistake that could have easily been avoided.
  • In a conversation about cringe-worthy moments, someone might say, “I facepalmed so hard when I saw that awkward interaction.”

17. Faceplant

This term is used to describe a person falling or stumbling forward in a way that causes their face to make contact with the ground or another surface.

  • For instance, if someone trips over their own feet and falls face-first, you might say they faceplanted.
  • In a video of a skateboarder attempting a trick and failing miserably, a comment might read, “That’s going to be a faceplant.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Be careful running in those shoes, or you’ll end up faceplanting.”

18. Cringe

This term is used to describe the feeling of secondhand embarrassment or discomfort caused by witnessing someone’s awkward or embarrassing action or statement.

  • For example, if you watch a video of someone singing poorly, you might cringe.
  • A person might cringe when they see someone wearing a completely mismatched outfit.
  • In a discussion about cringeworthy moments, someone might share, “I cringed so hard when my boss told that terrible joke.”

19. Triggered

This term is used to describe a strong emotional reaction, often negative, that is triggered by a specific event, statement, or situation. It is often associated with feeling angry, upset, or offended.

  • For instance, if someone makes a derogatory comment about a particular group, members of that group might feel triggered.
  • In a heated online debate, one person might accuse the other of trying to trigger them.
  • A person might share, “That movie scene always triggers me because it reminds me of a traumatic event.”

20. Roast

This term is used to describe the act of mockingly and humorously insulting someone or something. It often involves playful banter and clever comebacks.

  • For example, during a roast, comedians take turns making fun of the guest of honor.
  • Friends might engage in a friendly roast, poking fun at each other’s quirks and habits.
  • In a comment section, someone might jokingly say, “I’m ready to roast anyone who disagrees with me.”

21. Drag

To “drag” someone means to harshly insult or criticize them, often in a public or online setting.

  • For example, “She really dragged him in her latest tweet.”
  • During a heated argument, one person might say, “I’m about to drag you for that comment.”
  • A celebrity might respond to a negative article by saying, “They really dragged me in that piece.”

22. Rip

To “rip” someone or something means to criticize or mock them in a humorous or exaggerated way.

  • For instance, “He’s always ripping on his friends for their fashion choices.”
  • A reviewer might say, “I’m about to rip this movie apart for its terrible acting.”
  • Someone might comment on a social media post, “The internet is going to rip you for that spelling mistake.”

23. Slam

To “slam” someone means to criticize or attack them harshly, often in a forceful or aggressive manner.

  • For example, “She really slammed him during the debate.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “I’m going to slam you with the truth.”
  • A journalist might write, “The politician was slammed by critics for his controversial statements.”

24. Trash

To “trash” someone or something means to criticize or insult them in a harsh or derogatory manner.

  • For instance, “They trashed her performance in their review.”
  • During a heated argument, one person might say, “I’m going to trash your reputation.”
  • A celebrity might respond to negative comments by saying, “Don’t come for me unless I send for you, because I will trash you.”

25. Diss

To “diss” someone means to insult or belittle them, often in a clever or sarcastic way.

  • For example, “He’s always dissing his friends with his witty comebacks.”
  • During a playful argument, one person might say, “I’m about to diss you so hard.”
  • A rapper might boast, “Nobody can diss me better than I can diss myself.”

26. Shade

When someone throws shade, they are subtly insulting or criticizing someone without being overt or direct about it.

  • For example, “She threw shade at her ex-boyfriend by saying she’s glad she upgraded.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t throw shade at her outfit just because you’re jealous.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity, someone might comment, “They always throw shade at other artists in their interviews.”

27. Call out

To call out someone means to publicly criticize or confront them, usually for something they have done wrong or inappropriate.

  • For instance, “I had to call out my coworker for taking credit for my work.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to call out the company for their unethical practices.”
  • In a discussion about social justice, someone might comment, “We need to call out racism whenever we see it.”

28. Tear apart

To tear apart means to criticize or dismantle something or someone in a harsh or thorough manner.

  • For example, “The movie critic tore apart the latest blockbuster for its poor plot and acting.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to tear apart this argument with solid evidence.”
  • In a review of a restaurant, someone might comment, “The food was so bad, I could tear it apart.”

29. Nitpick

To nitpick means to find fault or criticize someone or something for minor or trivial reasons.

  • For instance, “She always nitpicks about my grammar.”
  • A person might say, “Stop nitpicking and focus on the bigger issue.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might comment, “I enjoyed it overall, but I have a few nitpicks about the plot holes.”

30. Takedown

To takedown means to strongly criticize or debunk someone or something, often with the intention of discrediting or exposing flaws.

  • For example, “The journalist wrote an article to takedown the politician’s false claims.”
  • A person might say, “She’s an expert at takedowns, always exposing the truth.”
  • In a debate, someone might comment, “He delivered a powerful takedown of his opponent’s argument.”

31. Rant

A passionate or angry speech or piece of writing that expresses frustration or criticism. A rant is often characterized by its emotional tone and lack of restraint.

  • For example, “I went on a rant about the terrible service at the restaurant.”
  • A person might say, “I had to rant about the injustice I witnessed.”
  • Another might write, “I just need to rant about how much I hate Mondays.”

32. Bash

To strongly and publicly criticize or condemn someone or something. “Bash” is often used to describe harsh and negative comments or actions towards a person or their ideas.

  • For instance, “She bashed the politician for his controversial statements.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t bash her. She’s just expressing her opinion.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t believe how much people bash this TV show.”

33. Flay

To criticize or reprimand someone severely. “Flay” is often used to describe a harsh and intense form of criticism.

  • For example, “The teacher flayed the student for not completing the assignment.”
  • A person might say, “My boss really flayed me for the mistake I made.”
  • Another might comment, “The critics flayed the director for his latest film.”

34. Censure

To express strong disapproval or criticism towards someone’s actions or behavior. “Censure” often implies a formal or official condemnation.

  • For instance, “The committee voted to censure the politician for his unethical behavior.”
  • A person might say, “I received a censure from my supervisor for my poor performance.”
  • Another might comment, “The public censured the celebrity for their offensive remarks.”

35. Berate

To scold or criticize someone angrily and forcefully. “Berate” suggests a relentless and harsh verbal attack.

  • For example, “She berated her employees for their incompetence.”
  • A person might say, “My parents berated me for coming home late.”
  • Another might comment, “The coach berated the team for their poor performance.”

36. Pillory

To pillory someone means to publicly criticize or ridicule them, often in a harsh or mocking manner. It can involve mocking or making fun of someone’s actions, beliefs, or appearance.

  • For example, a political commentator might say, “The media pilloried the candidate for his controversial remarks.”
  • In a social media post, someone might write, “I can’t believe people are still pillorying her for that mistake she made years ago.”
  • A journalist might write, “The actor was pilloried by the press for his insensitive comments.”

37. Skewer

To skewer someone is to criticize or mock them harshly, often with a sarcastic or biting tone. It involves pointing out flaws, mistakes, or hypocrisy in a person’s actions or statements.

  • For instance, a comedian might skewer a politician’s speech by impersonating them and exaggerating their mannerisms.
  • In a review of a movie, a critic might write, “The film was skewered by reviewers for its weak plot and wooden acting.”
  • A social media user might comment, “I can’t believe you’re still defending him after he was skewered on national television.”

38. Lambaste

To lambaste someone is to strongly criticize or reprimand them, often with anger or harsh language. It involves expressing strong disapproval or condemnation of a person’s actions, behavior, or ideas.

  • For example, a teacher might lambaste a student for repeatedly failing to complete their assignments.
  • In a political debate, one candidate might lambaste their opponent for their stance on a controversial issue.
  • A journalist might write, “The CEO was lambasted for his decision to lay off thousands of employees.”

39. Reprimand

To reprimand someone is to officially scold or admonish them for their actions or behavior. It often involves a formal or authoritative figure expressing disapproval and issuing a warning or punishment.

  • For instance, a supervisor might reprimand an employee for repeatedly being late to work.
  • In a military setting, a commanding officer might reprimand a soldier for breaking a rule or disobeying orders.
  • A parent might reprimand their child for misbehaving or not following instructions.
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40. Chastise

To chastise someone is to scold or criticize them severely, often with the intention of correcting their behavior or making them feel ashamed. It can involve expressing strong disapproval or disapproving of someone’s actions or choices.

  • For example, a coach might chastise a player for making a costly mistake during a game.
  • In a heated argument, one person might chastise the other for their hurtful words or insensitive comments.
  • A teacher might chastise a student for cheating on a test.

41. Rebuke

To express sharp disapproval or criticism of someone’s behavior or actions. “Rebuke” often implies a more formal or authoritative criticism.

  • For example, a teacher might rebuke a student for talking during class.
  • A boss might rebuke an employee for failing to meet a deadline.
  • A parent might rebuke their child for disobeying a rule.

42. Denounce

To publicly criticize or express strong disapproval of someone or something. “Denounce” often implies a more severe or vehement criticism.

  • For instance, a politician might denounce an opposing party’s policies.
  • A human rights organization might denounce a government for its treatment of prisoners.
  • A religious leader might denounce a particular behavior as immoral.

43. Reproach

To express disappointment, disapproval, or blame towards someone. “Reproach” often implies a sense of disappointment or personal offense.

  • For example, a friend might reproach another friend for canceling plans last minute.
  • A spouse might reproach their partner for forgetting an important anniversary.
  • A coworker might reproach a colleague for not completing their part of a project on time.

44. Upbraid

To criticize or reprimand someone in a harsh or severe manner. “Upbraid” often implies a strong verbal rebuke or scolding.

  • For instance, a coach might upbraid a player for making a costly mistake during a game.
  • A supervisor might upbraid an employee for consistently underperforming.
  • A parent might upbraid their child for repeatedly breaking the rules.
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45. Pan

To strongly and negatively criticize something or someone. “Pan” is often used to describe a harsh or unfavorable review.

  • For example, a movie critic might pan a poorly made film.
  • A food critic might pan a restaurant for its subpar dishes.
  • A music reviewer might pan an album for its lack of originality.

46. Paramount

Something that is of the utmost importance or significance. “Paramount” is often used to describe something that is critical or essential.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Teamwork is paramount to our success.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “Customer satisfaction is paramount for our company.”
  • Another might emphasize, “Safety is paramount in any construction project.”

47. Essential

Something that is absolutely necessary or indispensable. “Essential” is a term used to describe something that is critical or vital.

  • For instance, in cooking, one might say, “Salt is an essential ingredient in this recipe.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might say, “Regular exercise is essential for maintaining good health.”
  • A teacher might emphasize, “Attendance is essential for academic success.”

48. Indispensable

Something that is absolutely necessary or cannot be done without. “Indispensable” is often used to describe something that is critical or essential.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Mary is an indispensable member of our team.”
  • In a household, one might say, “A reliable car is indispensable for running errands.”
  • A teacher might emphasize, “Good communication skills are indispensable in the workplace.”

49. Imperative

Something that is absolutely necessary or critical. “Imperative” is a term used to describe something that is of utmost importance.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “It is imperative that you finish your homework before going out.”
  • In a military context, a commander might say, “Following orders is imperative for the success of the mission.”
  • A business leader might emphasize, “Adapting to new technologies is imperative for staying competitive.”

50. Decisive

Something that is critical or crucial in making a decision or determining an outcome. “Decisive” is often used to describe something that has a significant impact.

  • For example, a coach might say, “The team’s performance in the final game was decisive in winning the championship.”
  • In a legal context, a judge might say, “The evidence presented was decisive in determining the verdict.”
  • A manager might emphasize, “Making timely decisions is decisive in achieving business goals.”

51. Urgent

Something that requires immediate attention or action. It suggests that there is a time-sensitive matter that needs to be addressed quickly.

  • For example, a boss might say, “I need you to finish this report ASAP. It’s very urgent.”
  • A doctor might tell a patient, “We need to run some tests right away. It’s urgent to determine the cause of your symptoms.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “You need to bring your homework tomorrow. It’s urgent that you complete it on time.”

52. Pressing

Something that needs to be dealt with promptly because it is of great importance or significance. It implies that there is a sense of urgency and a need for immediate action.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “We have a pressing issue with a major client. We need to resolve it as soon as possible.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “There’s a pressing matter at home that requires your attention. Please come back as soon as you can.”
  • A student might say to their friend, “I have a pressing deadline for a project. I need to work on it right away.”

53. Acute

Used to describe a situation or condition that is extremely serious, intense, or critical. It suggests that the issue or problem is at a high level of severity or intensity.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “The patient is experiencing acute pain in their chest. We need to perform immediate tests.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “We have an acute situation with the upcoming exam. It will require extra preparation.”
  • A journalist might describe a crisis as, “The city is facing an acute shortage of essential supplies due to the natural disaster.”

54. Grave

Refers to a situation or condition that is extremely serious, critical, or dangerous. It implies that there are significant consequences or risks involved.

  • For instance, a lawyer might say, “The evidence against the defendant is grave. They could face severe penalties.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Your behavior has reached a grave point. We need to address it immediately.”
  • A news anchor might report, “The situation in the war-torn region is grave. Humanitarian aid is urgently needed.”

55. Severe

Describes a situation or condition that is very serious, intense, or critical. It suggests that the issue or problem is at a high level of severity or intensity.

  • For example, a meteorologist might say, “There is a severe storm warning in effect. Residents should take immediate precautions.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “The consequences for cheating are severe. It could result in expulsion.”
  • A doctor might describe a patient’s condition as, “The injury is severe and requires immediate surgery.”

56. Drastic

This word is used to describe a situation or action that has a significant and far-reaching impact or consequence. It implies a major change or shift in circumstances.

  • For example, “The company made a drastic decision to lay off half of its employees.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, one might say, “We need to take drastic measures to reduce our carbon footprint.”
  • Someone might describe a personal transformation as, “After a drastic lifestyle change, I lost 50 pounds.”

57. Serious

When something is serious, it means it is important, significant, or of great consequence. It often implies a level of severity or urgency.

  • For instance, “The doctor delivered the news with a serious tone.”
  • In a conversation about a global issue, one might say, “We need to address this serious problem immediately.”
  • A person might describe a difficult situation as, “I’m in a serious financial bind right now.”

58. Dire

Dire is used to describe a situation that is extremely serious or urgent. It often conveys a sense of impending danger or crisis.

  • For example, “The country is facing dire economic conditions.”
  • In a discussion about a natural disaster, one might say, “The hurricane caused dire consequences for the affected communities.”
  • A person might describe a desperate situation as, “I’m in dire need of help.”

59. Critical

Critical refers to something that is of vital importance or necessary for success. It implies a high level of significance or essentiality.

  • For instance, “The team’s performance during this game is critical to their chances of making it to the playoffs.”
  • In a conversation about a medical condition, one might say, “Early detection is critical for effective treatment.”
  • A person might describe a key decision as, “The CEO’s input is critical in determining the company’s future direction.”

60. Game-changing

Game-changing refers to something that has a significant and transformative impact on a particular situation or field. It implies a shift in the status quo or a disruptive innovation.

  • For example, “The new technology is game-changing in the world of communication.”
  • In a discussion about advancements in renewable energy, one might say, “This breakthrough could be game-changing for the industry.”
  • A person might describe a revolutionary product as, “This new invention is truly game-changing in the way we live our lives.”

61. Key factor

A key factor refers to an essential or critical element that greatly influences the outcome or success of something. It is something that cannot be overlooked or underestimated.

  • For example, “Time management is a key factor in achieving success.”
  • In a discussion about winning a basketball game, someone might say, “Rebounding is a key factor in controlling the game.”
  • A business owner might emphasize, “Customer satisfaction is a key factor in building a successful brand.”

62. Life-or-death

When something is described as life-or-death, it means that it is of the utmost importance and can determine whether someone lives or dies. It often refers to situations where immediate action or decision-making is necessary for survival.

  • For instance, “In a life-or-death situation, every second counts.”
  • During a medical emergency, a doctor might say, “We need to perform surgery right away. It’s a life-or-death situation.”
  • A soldier might describe a dangerous mission as “life-or-death” when discussing the risks involved.
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63. Do-or-die

The term “do-or-die” is used to describe a situation where success or failure is the only possible outcome. It implies that there is a high level of risk or urgency, and one must give their all to achieve the desired result.

  • For example, “This is a do-or-die situation. We have to give it everything we’ve got.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might say, “It’s the final quarter. It’s do-or-die time.”
  • A student might say, “I have to ace this exam. It’s a do-or-die moment for my grades.”

64. Mission-critical

When something is described as mission-critical, it means that it is absolutely necessary for the success of a mission or project. It refers to tasks, equipment, or personnel that cannot be compromised or neglected.

  • For instance, “Securing the perimeter is mission-critical for the success of the operation.”
  • In a software development project, a programmer might say, “Fixing this bug is mission-critical. It’s causing major issues.”
  • A team leader might emphasize, “Every team member’s contribution is mission-critical. We cannot afford any mistakes.”

65. Make it or break it

When something is described as a make it or break it situation, it means that it is a critical or pivotal moment that can either lead to success or failure. It often refers to situations where one’s actions or decisions greatly impact the outcome.

  • For example, “This is the make it or break it moment. We need to give it our best shot.”
  • In a job interview, someone might say, “The final round of interviews is the make it or break it stage.”
  • A business owner might say, “This marketing campaign is make it or break it for our company’s growth.”