Top 56 Slang For Crossly – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing frustration or annoyance, sometimes regular words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for feeling crossly comes in. Whether you’re venting about a bad day or just need a new way to convey your exasperation, our team has got you covered with a list of the trendiest and most relatable slang terms. Get ready to upgrade your vocabulary and connect with others who understand that feeling of being crossly!

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1. Pissed off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is very angry or irritated.

  • For example, “She was pissed off when she found out her car had been towed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m pissed off that my flight got canceled.”
  • Another might exclaim, “He was really pissed off when he lost the game.”

2. Mad

This word is a simple and direct way to describe anger.

  • For instance, “I’m mad at my friend for betraying my trust.”
  • A person might say, “I get mad when people don’t listen to me.”
  • Another might declare, “She was so mad that she slammed the door.”

3. Riled up

This phrase refers to someone who is extremely annoyed or upset.

  • For example, “The rude customer really riled me up.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t rile him up, he’s already in a bad mood.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She gets riled up over the smallest things.”

4. Agitated

This word describes someone who is irritated or disturbed.

  • For instance, “He was agitated by the constant noise.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling agitated because of all the stress.”
  • Another might declare, “The agitated crowd demanded answers.”

5. Fuming

This word is used to describe someone who is very angry or furious.

  • For example, “She was fuming after being lied to.”
  • A person might say, “He was fuming when his boss gave him extra work.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was fuming when my phone got stolen.”

6. Livid

When someone is livid, they are extremely angry or furious. It is often used to describe someone who is visibly enraged.

  • For example, “She was livid when she found out her partner had lied to her.”
  • A person might say, “I was absolutely livid when my boss gave the promotion to someone else.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’ve never seen my dad so livid before!”

7. Incensed

When someone is incensed, they are enraged or infuriated. It implies a strong and intense anger.

  • For instance, “The customers were incensed when they found out about the price increase.”
  • A person might say, “I am incensed by the way they treated me.”
  • Another might express, “Her actions left me absolutely incensed!”

8. Seething

When someone is seething, they are fuming with anger. It suggests a simmering anger that is about to boil over.

  • For example, “He was seething with anger after being betrayed by his best friend.”
  • A person might say, “I could see her seething with rage as she confronted the person who had wronged her.”
  • Another might comment, “The room was filled with tension as he sat there, seething in silence.”

9. Wrathful

When someone is wrathful, they are full of wrath or rage. It implies a deep and intense anger.

  • For instance, “The wrathful god punished those who defied him.”
  • A person might say, “His wrathful outburst shocked everyone in the room.”
  • Another might comment, “The wrathful expression on her face sent chills down my spine.”

10. Irate

When someone is irate, they are extremely angry or furious. It suggests a strong and intense anger.

  • For example, “The customer became irate when the store refused to issue a refund.”
  • A person might say, “I was irate when I found out about the betrayal.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Her constant interruptions made me irate!”

11. Steamed

To be extremely angry or infuriated.

  • For example, “I was steamed when I found out they had lied to me.”
  • A person might say, “I’m steamed at my boss for giving me extra work on a Friday.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was steamed when my favorite team lost the championship game.”

12. Vexed

To be irritated or bothered by something.

  • For instance, “I was vexed by the constant noise outside my window.”
  • A person might say, “I’m vexed with my friend for canceling our plans last minute.”
  • Another might complain, “I’m so vexed with this slow internet connection.”

13. Cross

To be irritated or angry.

  • For example, “I was cross when my roommate ate my leftovers.”
  • A person might say, “I’m cross with my sibling for borrowing my clothes without asking.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was cross when my flight got delayed for hours.”

14. Upset

To be emotionally disturbed or bothered.

  • For instance, “I was upset when I didn’t get the job I interviewed for.”
  • A person might say, “I’m upset with myself for forgetting an important appointment.”
  • Another might express, “I was really upset when my favorite TV show got canceled.”

15. Outraged

To be extremely angry or indignant.

  • For example, “I was outraged by the injustice I witnessed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m outraged at the government’s decision to cut funding for education.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was outraged when I heard about the animal cruelty happening at that farm.”

16. Displeased

Feeling a sense of dissatisfaction or disappointment.

  • For example, “She was displeased with the quality of the product.”
  • In a customer service interaction, a person might say, “I’m very displeased with the way I’ve been treated.”
  • A teacher might express displeasure by saying, “I’m displeased with the lack of effort from my students.”

17. Offended

Feeling upset or insulted by something someone said or did.

  • For instance, “She was deeply offended by his rude comment.”
  • A person might share, “I was offended when my friend made a joke about my appearance.”
  • In a discussion about cultural sensitivity, someone might comment, “It’s important to avoid saying things that could offend others.”

18. Disgruntled

Feeling angry or dissatisfied, often due to a perceived unfairness or mistreatment.

  • For example, “The disgruntled employee filed a complaint against their boss.”
  • A customer might say, “I’m disgruntled with the poor service I received.”
  • In a conversation about workplace morale, someone might mention, “Disgruntled employees can negatively impact the overall atmosphere.”

19. Bristling

Feeling annoyed or agitated, often accompanied by a tense or prickly demeanor.

  • For instance, “He was bristling with anger after the argument.”
  • A person might say, “I could tell she was bristling at my suggestion.”
  • In a discussion about pet peeves, someone might share, “People who chew loudly really make me bristle.”

20. Enraged

Feeling extreme anger or rage, often characterized by intense emotions and a loss of control.

  • For example, “He was enraged by the injustice he witnessed.”
  • A person might say, “I was absolutely enraged when I found out I had been lied to.”
  • In a conversation about road rage, someone might mention, “People can become dangerously enraged while driving.”

21. Infuriated

When someone is infuriated, they are filled with intense anger or rage. It describes a state of extreme frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, “She was infuriated when she found out her car had been towed.”
  • A person might say, “I was infuriated by their rude and disrespectful behavior.”
  • Another might express, “It infuriates me when people don’t follow basic rules of etiquette.”

22. Irked

When someone is irked, they are slightly annoyed or bothered by something. It refers to a feeling of displeasure or irritation, but not as intense as being infuriated.

  • For instance, “He was irked by the constant interruptions during the meeting.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really irked by the way they always leave the kitchen dirty.”
  • Another might express, “It irks me when people chew loudly.”

23. Teed off

To be teed off means to be extremely angry or irritated. It is a more informal and colorful way of expressing frustration or anger.

  • For example, “He was teed off when he found out his flight was canceled.”
  • A person might say, “I’m really teed off about the way they treated me.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Their constant lateness really tees me off!”

24. Piqued

When something piques someone’s interest or curiosity, it means it has provoked or aroused it. However, in the context of slang for being crossly, piqued refers to a feeling of annoyance or displeasure.

  • For instance, “Her constant interruptions piqued his irritation.”
  • A person might say, “I was piqued by their rude and disrespectful comments.”
  • Another might express, “It piques me when people don’t listen to me.”

25. Rankled

When something rankles, it means it causes persistent irritation or resentment. It refers to a feeling of ongoing annoyance or displeasure.

  • For example, “His insensitive remark rankled her for days.”
  • A person might say, “It rankles me when people make promises they don’t keep.”
  • Another might express, “Their constant complaining about trivial matters really rankles me.”

26. Aggravated

This term describes a feeling of being greatly annoyed or irritated by something or someone.

  • For example, “I was aggravated when my neighbor played loud music late at night.”
  • Someone might say, “I get aggravated when people chew with their mouths open.”
  • Another person might express, “The constant traffic jams in the city aggravate me.”

27. Perturbed

This word describes a state of being disturbed or unsettled by something or someone.

  • For instance, “I was perturbed by the news of the recent natural disaster.”
  • A person might say, “The rude behavior of some individuals perturbs me.”
  • Another might express, “The constant noise outside my apartment perturbs my sleep.”

28. Bothered

This term refers to feeling annoyed or troubled by something or someone.

  • For example, “I am bothered by the constant interruptions at work.”
  • Someone might say, “The cold weather bothers me.”
  • Another person might express, “The lack of organization in this office really bothers me.”

29. Chafed

This word describes a feeling of irritation or discomfort, often from rubbing against something.

  • For instance, “My skin chafed from wearing tight shoes all day.”
  • A person might say, “The rough fabric of the shirt chafed my skin.”
  • Another might express, “His sarcastic comments chafed me throughout the conversation.”

30. Put out

This term describes a state of being annoyed or inconvenienced by something or someone.

  • For example, “I was put out when my flight got delayed.”
  • Someone might say, “The constant requests for help put me out.”
  • Another person might express, “The sudden rainstorm really put us out during our picnic.”

31. Miffed

When someone is miffed, they are feeling slightly angry or irritated. It is a milder form of being cross.

  • For example, “She was miffed when her flight got delayed.”
  • A person might say, “I’m a little miffed that you didn’t invite me to the party.”
  • Another might comment, “He gets easily miffed when things don’t go his way.”

32. Crossed

When someone is crossed, they are feeling angry or upset. It is a stronger form of being cross.

  • For instance, “She was really crossed when she found out he lied to her.”
  • A person might say, “I get crossed when people disrespect me.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Don’t get me crossed, or you’ll regret it!”

33. Peeved

When someone is peeved, they are feeling irritated or annoyed. It is similar to being miffed, but slightly stronger.

  • For example, “He was peeved when his favorite team lost the game.”
  • A person might say, “I’m peeved that it’s raining on my day off.”
  • Another might complain, “I can’t stand it when people chew loudly. It really peeves me off!”

34. Huffy

When someone is huffy, they are in a bad mood or easily offended. It is often used to describe someone who is easily angered or takes offense easily.

  • For instance, “She was in a huffy mood all day.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t talk to him right now, he’s huffy.”
  • Another might comment, “She gets huffy over the smallest things.”

35. Testy

When someone is testy, they are easily irritated or annoyed. It implies that the person is in a cranky or irritable mood.

  • For example, “He’s been testy all morning, so be careful what you say.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling testy today, so please don’t bother me.”
  • Another might remark, “She’s always testy when she’s hungry.”

36. Snappy

When someone is snappy, they are easily irritated or prone to quick, sharp responses. It can also refer to a person who speaks or acts abruptly or curtly.

  • For example, “Don’t bother John right now, he’s feeling snappy.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult coworker, someone might say, “She’s always snappy with everyone.”
  • A friend might comment, “I’ve noticed you’ve been a bit snappy lately, is everything okay?”

37. Grumpy

Grumpy is used to describe someone who is consistently in a bad mood or easily annoyed. It can also refer to a person who is easily displeased or dissatisfied.

  • For instance, “He’s always grumpy in the mornings before he has his coffee.”
  • In a discussion about a moody character in a movie, someone might say, “The grumpy old man provides comedic relief.”
  • A person might comment, “I don’t know why she’s so grumpy all the time.”

38. Cranky

Cranky is similar to snappy in that it describes someone who is easily irritated or in a bad mood. It can also refer to a person who is ill-tempered or easily annoyed.

  • For example, “I’m feeling a bit cranky today, so please bear with me.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult customer, someone might say, “They were very cranky and demanding.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you so cranky lately? Is something bothering you?”

39. Grouchy

Grouchy is another word for being in a bad mood or easily annoyed. It can also refer to a person who is grumpy or ill-tempered.

  • For instance, “She’s always grouchy when she hasn’t had enough sleep.”
  • In a discussion about a character in a book, someone might say, “The grouchy neighbor adds a touch of realism to the story.”
  • A person might comment, “I don’t know why he’s so grouchy all the time.”

40. Sulky

Sulky is used to describe someone who is in a bad mood, often characterized by being silent, withdrawn, or pouting. It can also refer to a person who is sullen or resentful.

  • For example, “She’s sulky because she didn’t get her way.”
  • In a conversation about a sulky teenager, someone might say, “He’s always sulky and never wants to join family activities.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why are you being so sulky? Did something happen?”

41. Touchy

When someone is touchy, they are quick to take offense or become upset over small things.

  • For example, if you make a harmless joke and someone gets angry, you might say, “Wow, they’re really touchy.”
  • If someone is touchy about their appearance and gets upset when you make a comment, you might say, “Be careful what you say, they’re touchy about that.”
  • You might describe a person who is easily irritated as “touchy” and say,“touchy” and say, “Don’t say anything to them right now, they’re in a touchy mood.”

42. Crabby

When someone is crabby, they are in a bad mood and easily annoyed.

  • For instance, if someone is short-tempered and snaps at you for no reason, you might say, “They’re being crabby today.”
  • If someone is constantly complaining and being grumpy, you might say, “They’re always so crabby.”
  • When someone is in a bad mood and everything seems to bother them, you might describe them as “crabby” and say, “Don’t talk to them right now, they’re feeling crabby.”

43. Cantankerous

When someone is cantankerous, they are always in a bad mood and difficult to get along with.

  • For example, if someone is constantly arguing and being unpleasant, you might say, “They’re so cantankerous.”
  • If someone is easily irritated and always complaining, you might describe them as “cantankerous” and say, “Don’t mind them, they’re just being cantankerous.”
  • When someone is always grumpy and disagreeable, you might say, “I try to avoid them, they’re too cantankerous for my liking.”

44. Surly

When someone is surly, they are unfriendly, moody, and difficult to deal with.

  • For instance, if someone is being rude and uncooperative, you might say, “They’re being surly today.”
  • If a person is constantly giving short, unfriendly answers, you might describe them as “surly” and say, “Don’t expect any help from them, they’re always surly.”
  • When someone is in a bad mood and acting gruff or hostile, you might say, “Watch out for them, they can be surly.”

45. Ornery

When someone is ornery, they are difficult to deal with, often in a stubborn or ill-tempered way.

  • For example, if someone is being uncooperative and disagreeing with everything, you might say, “They’re being ornery.”
  • If a person is constantly in a bad mood and always looking for an argument, you might describe them as “ornery” and say, “Just ignore them, they’re always so ornery.”
  • When someone is being difficult and disagreeable, you might say, “Don’t bother trying to reason with them, they’re just ornery.”

46. Snarly

Snarly is a slang term used to describe someone who is in a bad mood or easily irritated. It can also refer to someone who is snappy or quick-tempered.

  • For example, “Don’t talk to him right now, he’s feeling snarly.”
  • A person might say, “I woke up on the wrong side of the bed today and I’ve been snarly all day.”
  • In a conversation about difficult coworkers, someone might say, “She’s always so snarly in the mornings, it’s hard to work with her.”

47. Annoyed

Annoyed is a common word used to describe a feeling of irritation or frustration. It can refer to a mild form of anger or displeasure.

  • For instance, “I’m really annoyed that my favorite show got canceled.”
  • A person might say, “I get so annoyed when people chew loudly.”
  • In a discussion about pet peeves, someone might mention, “One thing that really annoys me is when people don’t clean up after themselves.”

48. Irritated

Irritated is a word used to describe a feeling of annoyance or agitation. It can refer to a mild form of anger or frustration.

  • For example, “The constant noise from construction next door is really irritating.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so irritated that my computer keeps freezing.”
  • In a conversation about traffic, someone might say, “I get really irritated when people don’t use their turn signals.”

49. Bitter

Bitter is a slang term used to describe someone who is resentful or holds a grudge. It can also refer to a feeling of anger or disappointment.

  • For instance, “He’s still bitter about not getting the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “I’m bitter that my ex cheated on me.”
  • In a discussion about a sports rivalry, someone might say, “Fans of the losing team are bitter about the outcome.”

50. Hot under the collar

Hot under the collar is a slang term used to describe someone who is angry or upset. It can refer to a person who is visibly agitated or heated.

  • For example, “He got hot under the collar when he found out he had been lied to.”
  • A person might say, “I was so hot under the collar after that argument.”
  • In a conversation about frustrating situations, someone might say, “I always get hot under the collar when I’m stuck in traffic.”

51. Ticked off

When someone is “ticked off,” they are feeling angry or annoyed about something.

  • For example, “I was really ticked off when my flight got delayed.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t mess with him right now, he’s really ticked off.”
  • Another might vent, “I’m so ticked off at my boss for giving me extra work.”

52. Bent out of shape

To be “bent out of shape” means to be extremely upset or angry about something.

  • For instance, “She got bent out of shape when she found out they canceled her favorite TV show.”
  • A person might say, “Why are you so bent out of shape? It’s not a big deal.”
  • Another might comment, “He’s always getting bent out of shape over the smallest things.”

53. Seeing red

When someone is “seeing red,” they are feeling intense anger or rage.

  • For example, “I was seeing red when I found out someone stole my bike.”
  • A person might say, “She made me see red with her rude comments.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I saw red when I saw how much they raised the prices!”

54. Up in arms

To be “up in arms” means to be extremely angry or outraged about something.

  • For instance, “The community was up in arms about the proposed construction project.”
  • A person might say, “I’m up in arms about the way they treated me.”
  • Another might comment, “The customers were up in arms when the store ran out of the sale item.”

55. Fit to be tied

When someone is “fit to be tied,” they are extremely angry or agitated about something.

  • For example, “He was fit to be tied when he found out his car got towed.”
  • A person might say, “She was fit to be tied when she heard the news.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I was fit to be tied when I saw the mess they made!”

56. In a huff

When someone is in a huff, they are angry or upset about something. It implies a state of annoyance or irritation.

  • For example, “She stormed out of the room in a huff after her friend made a rude comment.”
  • A person might say, “He’s been in a huff all day because his favorite team lost the game.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s always in a huff when things don’t go her way.”
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