Top 16 Slang For Cumbersome – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing something that’s difficult to handle or burdensome, finding the right words can be a bit of a challenge. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a list of the most fitting slang terms for cumbersome situations. Stay tuned to upgrade your vocabulary and tackle those tricky moments with ease!

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1. Clunky

Used to describe something that is heavy, awkward, or difficult to use or move. It implies a lack of grace or smoothness in movement or operation.

  • For example, “These old computers are so clunky, it’s time for an upgrade.”
  • When discussing a car, someone might say, “The SUV feels a bit clunky to drive.”
  • A person might complain, “These boots are so clunky, it’s hard to walk in them.”

2. Bulky

Refers to something that is large, heavy, and difficult to move or handle due to its size or weight. It suggests that the object takes up a lot of space or is hard to transport.

  • For instance, “That old TV is so bulky, it’s hard to find a place for it.”
  • When discussing luggage, someone might say, “I prefer a smaller suitcase because the bulky ones are hard to carry.”
  • A person might comment, “These winter coats are so bulky, they make it hard to move freely.”

3. Unwieldy

Describes something that is awkward or clumsy to use or handle. It suggests that the object is not designed for ease of use or is cumbersome to manipulate.

  • For example, “This new software is so unwieldy, it’s hard to navigate.”
  • When discussing a piece of furniture, someone might say, “The desk is so unwieldy, it’s a challenge to move.”
  • A person might complain, “These gardening tools are so unwieldy, they make it difficult to do precise work.”

4. Cumbersome

Refers to something that is heavy, large, or complicated to use or handle. It implies that the object is difficult to maneuver or causes inconvenience or difficulty.

  • For instance, “The new regulations are cumbersome and make the process more time-consuming.”
  • When discussing a piece of equipment, someone might say, “The machinery is so cumbersome, it’s hard to transport.”
  • A person might comment, “This backpack is so cumbersome, it weighs me down.”

5. Hulking

Describes something that is large, heavy, and imposing due to its size or weight. It suggests that the object is both physically impressive and difficult to handle or move.

  • For example, “The hulking statue dominated the courtyard.”
  • When discussing a vehicle, someone might say, “The hulking truck took up two parking spaces.”
  • A person might comment, “These hulking bookshelves are hard to assemble and move.”

6. Tedious

This word is used to describe something that is dull, tiresome, or repetitive. It implies that a task or activity requires a lot of effort and patience.

  • For example, “Writing a 10-page research paper can be tedious.”
  • A person might complain, “Cleaning the entire house is such a tedious chore.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “I spent the whole day doing tedious data entry.”

7. Awkward

This word is used to describe a situation or behavior that is uncomfortable, embarrassing, or socially difficult. It implies a feeling of unease or self-consciousness.

  • For instance, “Walking into a room full of strangers can be awkward.”
  • A person might say, “I had an awkward encounter with my ex at the grocery store.”
  • In a conversation, someone might comment, “That was an awkward silence.”

8. Inconvenient

This word is used to describe something that causes difficulty or is not easily accessible. It implies that a situation or circumstance is not convenient or favorable.

  • For example, “Having to wait for the bus in the rain is inconvenient.”
  • A person might say, “It’s inconvenient to have to drive all the way across town for a meeting.”
  • In a discussion about travel, someone might mention, “The lack of direct flights to that destination is inconvenient.”

9. Troublesome

This word is used to describe something or someone that causes problems or difficulties. It implies that a situation or person is troublesome and requires extra effort or attention.

  • For instance, “Dealing with a leaky faucet can be troublesome.”
  • A person might complain, “My computer has been acting up and it’s becoming troublesome.”
  • In a conversation about parenting, someone might say, “Teenagers can be quite troublesome at times.”

10. Clumsy

This word is used to describe someone or something that lacks coordination or grace. It implies that a person or object is awkward or prone to accidents or mishaps.

  • For example, “I’m so clumsy, I always trip over my own feet.”
  • A person might say, “I dropped my phone again, I’m so clumsy.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might comment, “He’s a great player, but a bit clumsy on the field.”

11. Arduous

Arduous refers to something that is difficult, requiring a lot of effort or stamina to complete.

  • For example, “Running a marathon is an arduous task.”
  • A student might say, “Studying for finals can be arduous.”
  • Someone might complain, “Cleaning the entire house is such an arduous chore.”

12. Laborious

Laborious describes something that requires a lot of time and effort to complete.

  • For instance, “Writing a research paper can be laborious.”
  • A person might say, “Assembling a piece of furniture can be laborious.”
  • Someone might complain, “Doing laundry can be such a laborious task.”

13. Onerous

Onerous refers to something that is burdensome or oppressive, often involving a lot of responsibility or difficulty.

  • For example, “Paying off student loans can be onerous.”
  • A person might say, “Managing a large team can be onerous.”
  • Someone might complain, “Filling out all these forms is so onerous.”

14. Grueling

Grueling describes something that is extremely tiring, demanding a lot of physical or mental effort.

  • For instance, “Running a marathon is a grueling task.”
  • A person might say, “Working long hours on a project can be grueling.”
  • Someone might complain, “The hike up the mountain was so grueling.”

15. a pain in the neck

This phrase is a slang expression used to describe something or someone that is bothersome or irritating.

  • For example, “Dealing with customer complaints can be a pain in the neck.”
  • A person might say, “Fixing a leaky faucet can be a pain in the neck.”
  • Someone might complain, “Having to wait in line for hours is such a pain in the neck.”

16. Labored

Refers to something that requires a lot of effort or is difficult to do. It can also describe something that feels heavy or burdensome.

  • For example, “Carrying all those heavy boxes up the stairs was a labored task.”
  • Someone might say, “I find it labored to read this dense academic article.”
  • In a conversation about physical fitness, one might comment, “Running a marathon is a labored endeavor that requires months of training.”
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