Top 65 Slang For Damaged – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing feelings of being hurt, broken, or worn down, finding the right words can be a challenge. That’s where our team comes in. We’ve scoured the depths of modern slang to bring you a curated list of the top slang terms for feeling damaged. From relatable to quirky, get ready to expand your vocabulary and connect with others who may be feeling the same way.

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1. Wrecked

This term is often used to describe something that has been severely damaged or rendered inoperable.

  • For example, if a car is involved in a major accident, it might be described as “wrecked.”
  • In a video game, if a player’s character is defeated with no chance of recovery, they might say, “I got wrecked.”
  • A person who stayed up all night studying might say, “I feel wrecked today.”

2. Totaled

When something is “totaled,” it means that it has been damaged to such an extent that it is not worth repairing or salvaging.

  • For instance, if a car is involved in a serious accident and the repair costs exceed the value of the car, it is considered “totaled.”
  • If a person accidentally drops their phone in water and it stops working, they might say, “My phone is totaled.”
  • In a video game, if a player’s character is defeated with no chance of revival, they might say, “I got totally totaled.”

3. Busted

This term is often used to describe something that is no longer functioning properly or has been physically damaged.

  • For example, if a person’s phone screen is cracked, they might say, “My phone is busted.”
  • If a person’s bike tire is flat, they might say, “My tire is busted.”
  • In a video game, if a player’s weapon breaks during combat, they might say, “My sword is busted.”

4. Trashed

When something is “trashed,” it means that it has been subjected to extreme damage or destruction.

  • For instance, if a house has been vandalized and furniture is broken, it might be described as “trashed.”
  • If a person accidentally drops a glass and it shatters into pieces, they might say, “I trashed that glass.”
  • In a video game, if a player’s base is raided and all their resources are stolen, they might say, “My base got trashed.”

5. Kaput

This term is often used to describe something that has completely stopped working or is no longer functional.

  • For example, if a person’s computer crashes and cannot be restarted, they might say, “My computer is kaput.”
  • If a person’s blender stops blending and cannot be fixed, they might say, “My blender is kaput.”
  • In a video game, if a player’s vehicle explodes and cannot be repaired, they might say, “My car is kaput.”

6. Mangled

When something is mangled, it means that it has been severely damaged or disfigured, often beyond repair.

  • For example, “The car was mangled after the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I dropped my phone and now the screen is completely mangled.”
  • In a discussion about a ruined painting, someone might comment, “The artwork was mangled beyond recognition.”

7. Ruined

When something is ruined, it means that it has been completely destroyed or spoiled, often to the point of no return.

  • For instance, “The storm ruined our outdoor party.”
  • A person might say, “I accidentally spilled coffee on my laptop and now it’s ruined.”
  • In a conversation about a failed project, someone might comment, “The entire presentation was ruined by technical difficulties.”

8. Smashed

When something is smashed, it means that it has been broken or crushed into small pieces, often as a result of force or impact.

  • For example, “The vase fell off the shelf and smashed into a thousand pieces.”
  • A person might say, “I accidentally stepped on my sunglasses and they got smashed.”
  • In a discussion about a car accident, someone might comment, “The front of the car was completely smashed.”

9. Cracked

When something is cracked, it means that it has been damaged with a visible break or fracture, often compromising its integrity or functionality.

  • For instance, “I dropped my phone and now the screen is cracked.”
  • A person might say, “The mirror fell off the wall and cracked in half.”
  • In a conversation about a broken dish, someone might comment, “The plate has a big crack running through it.”

10. Shattered

When something is shattered, it means that it has been broken into numerous small pieces, often resulting in a complete loss of its original form.

  • For example, “The glass bottle fell off the table and shattered on the floor.”
  • A person might say, “The picture frame fell off the wall and shattered into fragments.”
  • In a discussion about a broken window, someone might comment, “The glass is completely shattered.”

11. Dinged

This term is used to describe something that has been slightly damaged or has a small dent or mark on it. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a person who has been emotionally or mentally affected by a negative experience.

  • For example, “I accidentally dinged my car door on a parking meter.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been dinged by the breakup, but she’ll bounce back.”
  • In a discussion about a used item, someone might mention, “The product is in good condition but has a few dings here and there.”

12. Battered

This term is used to describe something that has been heavily damaged or worn from use or abuse. It can refer to physical objects or a person’s appearance or condition.

  • For instance, “The old book was battered and missing its cover.”
  • A person might say, “After years of hard work, his body is battered and worn.”
  • In a discussion about a damaged vehicle, someone might mention, “The car was in a battered state after the accident.”

13. Tattered

This term is used to describe something that is worn or torn, usually referring to fabric or clothing. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a person or their appearance as worn out or exhausted.

  • For example, “The flag was tattered and torn after being exposed to harsh weather.”
  • A person might say, “She arrived at the party looking tattered and exhausted.”
  • In a discussion about old documents, someone might mention, “The ancient manuscript was tattered and barely readable.”

14. Defunct

This term is used to describe something that is no longer functioning or existing. It is often used to refer to businesses, organizations, or products that have ceased operations or become obsolete.

  • For instance, “The company went bankrupt and is now defunct.”
  • A person might say, “The old computer is defunct and can’t be repaired.”
  • In a discussion about outdated technology, someone might mention, “Floppy disks are defunct in today’s digital age.”

15. In shambles

This term is used to describe something that is completely destroyed or in a state of chaos and disarray. It can refer to physical structures, plans, or even a person’s life or emotions.

  • For example, “After the earthquake, the city was in shambles.”
  • A person might say, “Her life fell apart and is now in shambles.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might mention, “The team’s plans were in shambles from the beginning.”

16. In pieces

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely broken or shattered into small fragments.

  • For example, “After the accident, the vase was in pieces on the floor.”
  • A person might say, “My heart is in pieces after the breakup.”
  • In a discussion about a car crash, someone might say, “The car was in pieces after the collision.”

17. In ruins

This phrase is used to describe something that is completely destroyed or in a state of disrepair.

  • For instance, “After the earthquake, the city was left in ruins.”
  • A person might say, “My life is in ruins after losing my job.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business, someone might say, “The company is in ruins due to mismanagement.”

18. In disrepair

This phrase is used to describe something that is not in good condition or needs repairs.

  • For example, “The old house is in disrepair and needs extensive renovations.”
  • A person might say, “My car is in disrepair and needs to be taken to the mechanic.”
  • In a discussion about neglected infrastructure, someone might say, “The bridges in this city are in disrepair and pose a safety risk.”

19. Out of commission

This phrase is used to describe something that is not currently in use or is temporarily not functioning.

  • For instance, “The elevator is out of commission, so we have to take the stairs.”
  • A person might say, “My phone is out of commission until I get it repaired.”
  • In a discussion about a broken appliance, someone might say, “The dishwasher is out of commission, so we have to wash the dishes by hand.”

20. Gone to pieces

This phrase is used to describe something that has completely broken or fallen apart, often due to emotional distress or a traumatic event.

  • For example, “After the loss of her loved one, she felt like her world had gone to pieces.”
  • A person might say, “My life has gone to pieces since the accident.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “The team’s plans have gone to pieces and we need to regroup.”

21. On the fritz

This phrase is used to describe something that is not functioning correctly or is experiencing technical difficulties.

  • For example, “My computer is on the fritz, I can’t access any of my files.”
  • A person might say, “The TV is on the fritz, I can’t get a clear picture.”
  • Someone might complain, “My car’s engine is on the fritz, it keeps stalling.”

22. Down for the count

This phrase is often used to describe someone or something that has been completely defeated or rendered unable to continue.

  • For instance, “After a long and grueling battle, the boxer was down for the count.”
  • A person might say, “I partied too hard last night, I’m down for the count today.”
  • Someone might comment, “The team’s star player got injured and is down for the count.”

23. Toast

This term is used to describe something that is completely ruined or beyond any hope of repair.

  • For example, “I accidentally spilled coffee on my laptop, now it’s toast.”
  • A person might say, “The storm caused extensive damage to our house, it’s toast.”
  • Someone might comment, “I dropped my phone in the water, it’s toast.”

24. Shot

This word is used to describe something that is worn out, broken, or no longer functioning properly.

  • For instance, “My old car is shot, it keeps breaking down.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working non-stop for hours, I’m shot.”
  • Someone might comment, “The printer is shot, it’s not printing anything.”

25. Fried

This term is used to describe something that is completely damaged or destroyed, often due to excessive heat or overuse.

  • For example, “I accidentally left my phone in the sun, now it’s fried.”
  • A person might say, “The power surge fried my computer, it won’t turn on.”
  • Someone might comment, “The engine is fried, the car won’t start.”

26. Totalled

When a vehicle or object is damaged beyond repair or in a way that renders it useless. The term “totalled” is commonly used to describe a car that has been in a severe accident and cannot be repaired.

  • For example, “My car was totalled in the crash, so I had to buy a new one.”
  • A person might say, “That storm totalled our backyard, knocking down trees and destroying our fence.”
  • In a discussion about insurance claims, someone might mention, “If your car is totalled, you’ll need to file a claim and find a replacement.”

27. Banged up

When a person or object has been physically damaged or injured, often resulting in visible marks or bruises. “Banged up” is a slang term used to describe someone or something that has been through a rough experience or suffered physical harm.

  • For instance, “I fell down the stairs and got all banged up.”
  • A person might say, “After the car accident, I was pretty banged up but luckily nothing was broken.”
  • In a conversation about a sports injury, someone might mention, “He got banged up pretty bad during the game and had to sit out.”

28. Beat-up

When an object or person is in a state of disrepair or has been extensively used, resulting in visible damage or signs of wear. “Beat-up” is a colloquial term used to describe something that looks old, worn out, or in poor condition.

  • For example, “My shoes are so beat-up, I need to buy a new pair.”
  • A person might say, “I found this beat-up old guitar in my attic, but it still plays beautifully.”
  • In a discussion about a dilapidated building, someone might comment, “That house looks really beat-up, it needs a lot of repairs.”

29. Wounded

When a person or animal has sustained a physical injury, typically caused by an accident, violence, or war. “Wounded” is a term used to describe someone who has been hurt but not necessarily to the extent of being critical or life-threatening.

  • For instance, “The soldier was wounded in battle and had to be evacuated for medical treatment.”
  • A person might say, “I accidentally cut myself while cooking and now I’m wounded.”
  • In a conversation about a dog attack, someone might mention, “The little girl was badly wounded and had to undergo surgery.”

30. Limping

When a person or animal has difficulty walking or moves with an abnormal gait due to an injury or pain in one of their legs or feet. “Limping” is a term used to describe the act of walking in a way that indicates physical discomfort or injury.

  • For example, “After twisting his ankle, he was limping for a few days.”
  • A person might say, “My dog hurt his paw and now he’s limping.”
  • In a discussion about sports injuries, someone might comment, “He had a sprained knee and was limping off the field.”

31. Bruised

When something or someone is bruised, it means they have been physically harmed or injured. It can also be used metaphorically to describe emotional or psychological damage.

  • For example, “After the fight, his face was bruised and swollen.”
  • Someone might say, “Her ego was bruised when she didn’t get the promotion.”
  • In a discussion about a damaged car, a person might mention, “The bumper was bruised in the accident.”

32. Hurt

To be hurt means to be in pain or to have sustained an injury. It can refer to physical, emotional, or psychological pain.

  • For instance, “I hurt my back lifting heavy boxes.”
  • Someone might say, “Her words hurt me deeply.”
  • In a conversation about a damaged relationship, a person might mention, “Both parties were hurt by the betrayal.”

33. Defective

When something is defective, it means it has a flaw or is not working properly. This term is often used to describe products or objects that are damaged or malfunctioning.

  • For example, “The toy was defective and didn’t work.”
  • A person might say, “The computer’s defective hard drive caused it to crash.”
  • In a discussion about a faulty appliance, someone might mention, “The defective wiring caused a fire.”

34. Injured

To be injured means to be harmed or wounded, usually as a result of an accident, physical activity, or violence. It can refer to physical, emotional, or psychological harm.

  • For instance, “He was injured in a car crash.”
  • Someone might say, “The athlete injured her ankle during the game.”
  • In a conversation about a damaged painting, a person might mention, “The artwork was injured during transport.”

35. Crumbled

When something crumbles, it means it has fallen apart or collapsed, often due to damage or decay. This term can be used literally or metaphorically to describe the breaking down or destruction of something.

  • For example, “The old building crumbled to the ground in the earthquake.”
  • A person might say, “Her dreams crumbled when she didn’t get accepted into her dream school.”
  • In a discussion about a damaged cookie, someone might mention, “The cookie crumbled in my hand.”

36. Torn

This term refers to something that has been forcefully separated or divided, often resulting in damage or destruction. It can be used to describe physical objects as well as emotional states.

  • For example, “I accidentally tore my favorite shirt while trying to untangle it from a hanger.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “My heart feels torn after the breakup.”
  • A person describing a torn document might say, “The important paper was torn in half, making it unreadable.”

37. Ruptured

This word is used to describe something that has experienced a sudden and violent breakage or bursting, often resulting in severe damage or loss of function.

  • For instance, “The water pipe ruptured, causing a flood in the basement.”
  • In a medical context, someone might say, “He suffered a ruptured appendix and required immediate surgery.”
  • A person describing a car accident might say, “The impact caused the gas tank to rupture, leading to a dangerous fuel leak.”

38. Decimated

This term is used to describe something that has been severely damaged or destroyed to the point of near annihilation.

  • For example, “The town was decimated by a tornado, leaving only a few buildings standing.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s performance, someone might say, “The opposing team decimated our defense, scoring goal after goal.”
  • A person describing the aftermath of a war might say, “The city was decimated, with entire neighborhoods reduced to rubble.”

39. Dilapidated

This word is used to describe something, typically a building or structure, that is in a state of decay, deterioration, or disrepair.

  • For instance, “The abandoned house had a dilapidated roof and broken windows.”
  • In a discussion about urban decay, someone might say, “The neighborhood was filled with dilapidated buildings and overgrown lots.”
  • A person describing an old car might say, “The dilapidated vehicle barely ran and had rust covering its exterior.”

40. Fractured

This term is used to describe something that has suffered a break or crack, often resulting in partial or complete separation of the object.

  • For example, “She fell and fractured her wrist, requiring a cast.”
  • In a discussion about geological formations, someone might say, “The earthquake caused the ground to fracture, creating deep fissures.”
  • A person describing a damaged bone might say, “The X-ray revealed a fractured rib, causing intense pain with each breath.”

41. Shoddy

This term is used to describe something that is of inferior quality or workmanship. It implies that the item is not well constructed or is likely to break or fail easily.

  • For example, “The shoddy craftsmanship of this furniture is evident in its wobbly legs.”
  • In a review of a product, someone might say, “I was disappointed with the shoddy construction of this phone case.”
  • A person might complain, “The shoddy repairs on my car resulted in more problems down the line.”

42. Flawed

This term is used to describe something that is not perfect or has errors or faults. It implies that there are issues or problems that detract from the overall quality or effectiveness of the item.

  • For instance, “This painting is beautiful, but it has a few flawed brushstrokes.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “While the plot was engaging, the flawed character development was a disappointment.”
  • A person might criticize, “The flawed design of this software makes it difficult to use.”

43. Impaired

This term is used to describe something that is weakened or damaged in some way. It implies that the item is not functioning at its full capacity or is hindered in its performance.

  • For example, “Her impaired vision made it difficult for her to read small print.”
  • In a discussion about a car, someone might say, “The impaired engine performance is likely due to a faulty fuel injector.”
  • A person might comment, “The impaired functionality of this app is frustrating and limits its usefulness.”

44. Faulty

This term is used to describe something that has a defect or malfunction that prevents it from functioning properly. It implies that there is a problem with the item that needs to be addressed or fixed.

  • For instance, “The faulty wiring in this house poses a fire hazard.”
  • In a review of a product, someone might say, “I received a faulty unit that stopped working after a few days.”
  • A person might complain, “The faulty brakes on this bike make it unsafe to ride.”

45. Worn-out

This term is used to describe something that is exhausted or no longer usable due to excessive use or age. It implies that the item has reached the end of its lifespan or usefulness.

  • For example, “His worn-out shoes had holes in the soles.”
  • In a discussion about a piece of furniture, someone might say, “The worn-out upholstery gives this chair a vintage look.”
  • A person might comment, “The worn-out batteries in this remote control need to be replaced.”

46. Ransacked

This term is often used to describe a place or area that has been thoroughly searched, looted, or vandalized.

  • For example, “The burglars ransacked the house, leaving a trail of destruction in their wake.”
  • In a discussion about a messy room, someone might say, “My kids ransacked the playroom, it’s a total disaster.”
  • A person describing a chaotic event might say, “After the party, the living room looked like it had been ransacked.”

47. Shabby

This word is used to describe something that is worn out, untidy, or in a state of neglect.

  • For instance, “The old chair in the corner of the room looked shabby and threadbare.”
  • When talking about a person’s appearance, one might say, “He showed up to the party in shabby clothes.”
  • A reviewer might describe a run-down hotel as, “The rooms were small and shabby, definitely not worth the price.”

48. Stricken

This term is often used to describe someone who is deeply affected by grief, sorrow, or a traumatic event.

  • For example, “She was stricken with grief after the loss of her loved one.”
  • When discussing a natural disaster, a news reporter might say, “The town was stricken by a devastating earthquake.”
  • A person describing their emotional state might say, “I felt stricken with fear when I heard the loud noise.”

49. Cracked up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is experiencing a state of extreme stress, anxiety, or breakdown.

  • For instance, “After working long hours for weeks, he finally cracked up and had a meltdown.”
  • When talking about a person’s mental state, one might say, “I feel like I’m cracking up under all the pressure.”
  • A friend might express concern by saying, “You seem really stressed lately, are you cracking up?”

50. Blemished

This word is used to describe something that has a small imperfection or defect, usually on its surface.

  • For example, “The otherwise pristine white wall had a blemished spot from a spilled drink.”
  • When talking about a person’s complexion, one might say, “She has flawless skin, not a single blemish.”
  • A reviewer might describe a product as, “The item arrived with a blemished surface, which was disappointing.”

51. Marred

This term refers to something that has been damaged or spoiled in some way. It implies that the object or person is no longer in perfect condition.

  • For example, “The beautiful painting was marred by a large scratch.”
  • In a discussion about a car accident, someone might say, “The front bumper of my car was marred in the collision.”
  • A person describing a damaged relationship might say, “Years of mistrust and betrayal have marred our friendship.”

52. Tainted

This word is used to describe something that has been spoiled or corrupted. It suggests that the item or person is no longer pure or trustworthy.

  • For instance, “The food was tainted with bacteria, causing many people to fall ill.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “The company’s reputation has been tainted by allegations of fraud.”
  • A person describing a toxic friendship might say, “Her manipulative behavior has tainted our relationship.”

53. Spoiled

This term is used to describe something that has been damaged or ruined, often due to neglect or excessive indulgence.

  • For example, “The milk has spoiled and is no longer safe to drink.”
  • In a discussion about a spoiled child, someone might say, “Her parents have indulged her every whim, and now she has become spoiled.”
  • A person describing a ruined surprise might say, “The surprise birthday party was spoiled when she accidentally found out.”

54. Scarred

This word is used to describe something that has been permanently marked or damaged, often leaving visible scars.

  • For instance, “The accident left him scarred for life, both physically and emotionally.”
  • In a discussion about a traumatic event, someone might say, “She is still scarred by the experience and has difficulty trusting others.”
  • A person describing a damaged painting might say, “The artwork is scarred by water damage and cannot be restored.”

55. Rattled

This term is used to describe someone who has been emotionally or mentally affected by a traumatic or shocking experience.

  • For example, “After witnessing the accident, she was visibly rattled and couldn’t speak.”
  • In a discussion about a stressful situation, someone might say, “The unexpected news has left me feeling rattled and anxious.”
  • A person describing a frightening encounter might say, “I was completely rattled by the encounter and couldn’t sleep for days.”

56. Deteriorated

This word describes something that is gradually breaking down or becoming worse over time.

  • For example, “The old house has deteriorated to the point where it’s no longer safe to live in.”
  • In a discussion about a car’s condition, someone might say, “The engine has deteriorated and will need to be replaced.”
  • A person might describe their health by saying, “My deteriorated immune system makes me more susceptible to illness.”

57. Defaced

This term refers to something that has been intentionally damaged or altered in a way that detracts from its original appearance or function.

  • For instance, “The statue was defaced with graffiti, ruining its beauty.”
  • In a conversation about historical landmarks, someone might say, “The monument was defaced by protestors during the demonstration.”
  • A person might describe a tagged wall by saying, “The building was defaced with spray paint.”

58. Weakened

This word describes something that has lost its strength or power, making it more vulnerable or less effective than before.

  • For example, “The weakened bridge couldn’t support the weight of the heavy truck.”
  • In a discussion about an athlete’s performance, someone might say, “The injury weakened his ability to perform at his usual level.”
  • A person might describe a weakened immune system by saying, “I’m more susceptible to getting sick because of my weakened immune system.”

59. Scratched

This term refers to something that has been marked or damaged by a rough surface or object, resulting in visible scratches.

  • For instance, “The tabletop was scratched by the sharp edge of a knife.”
  • In a conversation about a car’s exterior, someone might say, “The paint job is ruined with multiple scratches.”
  • A person might describe a scratched phone screen by saying, “I accidentally dropped my phone and now the screen is all scratched up.”

60. Chipped

This word describes something that has had a small piece broken off, often resulting in a noticeable flaw or imperfection.

  • For example, “The chipped mug still holds liquid, but it’s no longer in perfect condition.”
  • In a discussion about pottery, someone might say, “The vase is valuable despite the small chip on the rim.”
  • A person might describe a chipped tooth by saying, “I need to see the dentist to fix my chipped tooth.”

61. Dented

This term refers to something that has a small dent or indentation, usually caused by an impact or pressure.

  • For example, “The car door was dented after someone accidentally hit it with their shopping cart.”
  • A person might say, “I dropped my phone and now it’s all dented.”
  • Another example could be, “The bike’s fender got dented when it fell over.”

62. Warped

This slang term describes something that has become twisted or distorted, often due to heat or pressure.

  • For instance, “The wooden table warped after being left in the sun for too long.”
  • A person might say, “The vinyl record warped because I left it near a heat source.”
  • Another example could be, “The plastic container warped in the dishwasher.”

63. Weathered

This term refers to something that has been worn or damaged by exposure to the weather or other natural elements.

  • For example, “The wooden fence is weathered and has a grayish color.”
  • A person might say, “The old statue in the park is weathered from years of rain and wind.”
  • Another example could be, “The paint on the house is weathered and peeling.”

64. Fubar

This slang term stands for “Fucked Up Beyond All Recognition” and is used to describe something that is completely messed up or beyond repair.

  • For instance, “The computer crashed and now all my files are fubar.”
  • A person might say, “I tried to fix the leaky pipe, but now the whole plumbing system is fubar.”
  • Another example could be, “The party got out of control and the living room is fubar.”

65. Knackered

This slang term is used to describe someone or something that is extremely tired or worn out.

  • For example, “I’ve been working all day and now I’m completely knackered.”
  • A person might say, “After running a marathon, my legs are knackered.”
  • Another example could be, “The old car’s engine is knackered and needs to be replaced.”
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