Top 95 Slang For Deals-With – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to navigating the world of deals and negotiations, having the right slang can make all the difference. From business meetings to casual conversations, being fluent in the language of deals is essential for success. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the top slang for deals-with. Whether you’re a seasoned negotiator or just starting out, this listicle is sure to give you the edge you need to seal the deal. Get ready to up your game and impress your colleagues with your newfound deal-making vocabulary.

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1. Handle

To handle a situation or problem; to manage or take care of something.

  • For example, “I can handle the project on my own.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult customer, someone might say, “How did you handle their complaint?”
  • A person discussing stress management might advise, “Find healthy ways to handle your stress, like exercise or meditation.”

2. Manage

To take responsibility for controlling or organizing something; to handle or direct a task or situation.

  • For instance, “She manages a team of developers.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “I need to better manage my schedule.”
  • A person discussing financial planning might advise, “Learn how to manage your money effectively to reach your financial goals.”

3. Treat

To handle or take care of a situation; to address or approach something.

  • For example, “We need to treat this issue seriously.”
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might say, “We should always treat our customers with respect.”
  • A person discussing conflict resolution might advise, “Treat each other with empathy and understanding to resolve conflicts peacefully.”

4. Cope with

To deal with or manage a difficult or challenging situation; to face and overcome adversity.

  • For instance, “She is coping with the loss of her loved one.”
  • In a discussion about stress, someone might say, “I’m learning how to cope with work-related stress.”
  • A person discussing a personal struggle might share, “I’m trying to cope with my anxiety through therapy and self-care.”

5. Take care of

To manage or deal with a task or responsibility; to ensure something is done or attended to.

  • For example, “Can you take care of this assignment for me?”
  • In a conversation about household chores, someone might say, “I’ll take care of the dishes.”
  • A person discussing their role as a parent might say, “I prioritize taking care of my children’s needs.”

6. See to

This phrase means to handle or attend to a task or responsibility. It implies that someone is taking action to ensure that something is done or resolved.

  • For example, “I’ll see to it that the report is submitted on time.”
  • A manager might say, “Please see to the customer complaint and make sure it’s resolved.”
  • In a household, a parent might say, “I’ll see to the laundry and make sure it gets done.”

7. Get to grips with

This expression means to understand or become familiar with something, often by actively engaging with it or studying it. It implies a level of effort and determination to fully comprehend and gain proficiency in a particular subject or skill.

  • For instance, “I need to get to grips with this new software before the deadline.”
  • A student might say, “I have to get to grips with calculus if I want to pass the exam.”
  • A musician might explain, “To play this song well, you really need to get to grips with the complex rhythm.”

8. Come to grips with

This phrase means to accept or confront a challenging or difficult situation and actively work towards resolving or managing it. It implies a process of acknowledging and addressing a problem or issue.

  • For example, “He needs to come to grips with his addiction and seek help.”
  • A person dealing with a loss might say, “It took me a while to come to grips with the death of my loved one.”
  • In a therapy session, a counselor might guide a client to come to grips with their past traumas.

9. Behave towards

This phrase refers to the way someone acts or conducts themselves towards another person. It implies a conscious choice in how one behaves and treats others.

  • For instance, “He should behave towards his coworkers with respect and professionalism.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Remember to behave towards your grandparents when we visit them.”
  • In a customer service training, an instructor might emphasize, “Always behave towards customers with kindness and patience.”

10. Act towards

This phrase has a similar meaning to “behave towards.” It refers to the way someone acts or treats others, suggesting a deliberate choice in one’s actions and behavior.

  • For example, “She should act towards her classmates with kindness and inclusivity.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “You should always act towards your peers in a respectful manner.”
  • In a workplace, a supervisor might say, “Employees are expected to act towards each other in a professional and courteous manner.”

11. Conduct yourself towards

This phrase refers to how one should behave or interact with others in a particular situation. It emphasizes the importance of conducting oneself in a certain manner.

  • For example, in a professional setting, one might say, “It’s important to conduct yourself towards your colleagues with respect and professionalism.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might advise, “Remember to conduct yourself towards others with kindness and inclusivity.”
  • When discussing relationships, one might suggest, “It’s crucial to conduct yourself towards your partner with honesty and open communication.”

12. Act

This term refers to how one behaves or carries themselves in a given situation. It encompasses one’s actions, demeanor, and overall conduct.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “You need to act responsibly and do your homework.”
  • In a theater production, a director might instruct an actor, “Act confident and deliver your lines with conviction.”
  • When giving advice to a friend, someone might say, “Act like yourself and don’t try to be someone you’re not.”

13. Approach

This word refers to how one handles or deals with a situation or problem. It emphasizes the method or strategy used to address a particular issue.

  • For example, when faced with a difficult task, one might say, “I need to approach this problem with a creative mindset.”
  • In a conflict resolution scenario, someone might suggest, “We should approach this situation with empathy and understanding.”
  • When discussing a project at work, a colleague might advise, “Let’s approach this task with a collaborative mindset and divide the work evenly.”

14. Attend to

This phrase refers to the act of addressing or handling a task or responsibility. It implies a sense of obligation or duty to fulfill a particular role.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “You need to attend to your chores before going out to play.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might instruct their employee, “Please attend to these emails and respond to them promptly.”
  • When discussing personal finances, someone might advise, “It’s important to attend to your bills and budgeting to maintain financial stability.”

15. Behave

This term refers to how one acts or carries themselves in a given situation. It encompasses one’s actions, manners, and overall behavior.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Behave in class and follow the rules.”
  • In a social gathering, a host might remind their guests, “Please behave appropriately and be respectful of others.”
  • When discussing etiquette, someone might suggest, “It’s important to behave politely and show good manners in public.”

16. Clear

To have a clear understanding or comprehension of something. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone fully understands a concept or idea.

  • For example, if someone explains a complicated process, you might respond, “I’m not sure I clear on that.”
  • In a meeting, a colleague might ask, “Does everyone clear on the new project guidelines?”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “Make sure you clear on the instructions before starting the assignment.”

17. Act upon

To take action or follow through on something. This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is actively doing something based on a decision or information.

  • For instance, if someone gives you advice, you might say, “I will definitely act upon that.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We need to act upon the feedback we received from our customers.”
  • A friend might encourage you by saying, “Don’t just think about it, act upon your dreams!”

18. Serve

To provide assistance or help to someone. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone is being helpful or supportive in a particular situation.

  • For example, if someone offers to help you with a task, you might say, “Thanks for serving.”
  • In a restaurant, a waiter might ask, “Can I serve you anything else?”
  • A colleague might say, “I’m here to serve if you need any support.”

19. Use

To make use of something or employ it for a specific purpose. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone is using a tool, resource, or strategy to their advantage.

  • For instance, if someone suggests using a particular software, you might say, “I’ll definitely use that.”
  • In a conversation about productivity, a person might say, “I use various techniques to stay organized.”
  • A coach might advise an athlete, “Use your speed to your advantage in the game.”

20. Engage with

To interact or involve oneself with someone or something. This phrase is often used to indicate active participation or communication with a person or a topic.

  • For example, if someone shares an interesting article, you might say, “I would love to engage with that.”
  • In a classroom discussion, a student might say, “I like to engage with the material by asking questions.”
  • A social media influencer might encourage their followers by saying, “Don’t be afraid to engage with my content and leave comments.”

21. Respond to

This phrase is often used to indicate that someone is replying or answering a question or statement. It implies taking action in response to something.

  • For example, “Please respond to my email by the end of the day.”
  • In a conversation, one person might say, “I asked him a question, but he didn’t respond.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “Make sure to respond to any customer inquiries within 24 hours.”

22. React to

This phrase is used to describe how someone responds or shows a reaction to something. It implies a response that is influenced by emotions or thoughts.

  • For instance, “She reacted to the news with surprise and excitement.”
  • In a social media context, someone might post, “How would you react to this situation?”
  • A person might say, “I don’t know how to react to such a generous offer.”

23. Do by

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is following or adhering to a certain action or behavior. It implies doing something in accordance with a set of rules or expectations.

  • For example, “We should do by the company’s code of conduct.”
  • In a discussion about etiquette, someone might say, “It’s important to do by the rules of proper table manners.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Please do by the instructions on the assignment.”

24. View

This word is often used to indicate that someone is seeing or considering something in a particular way. It implies a perspective or opinion on a certain matter.

  • For instance, “I view this as a great opportunity.”
  • In a debate, one person might say, “I view the issue from a different angle.”
  • A reviewer might state, “In my view, this movie was a masterpiece.”

25. Regard

This word is used to indicate that someone is considering or thinking of something or someone in a particular way. It implies a level of respect or importance given to the subject.

  • For example, “She regards him as a mentor.”
  • In a professional setting, someone might say, “I regard this project as a top priority.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You should always regard your elders with respect.”

26. Consider

To carefully think about or contemplate something before making a decision or forming an opinion.

  • For example, “I will consider your offer and get back to you.”
  • In a discussion about potential solutions, someone might suggest, “Let’s consider all the possible options.”
  • A person might say, “I’m considering taking a vacation next month.”

27. Rate

To assess or determine the value, quality, or performance of something or someone.

  • For instance, “I would rate this restaurant five stars for its excellent service and delicious food.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you rate this movie on a scale of 1 to 10?”
  • In a review of a product, someone might say, “I rate this smartphone highly for its sleek design and advanced features.”

28. Esteem

To hold someone or something in high regard or admiration.

  • For example, “She is esteemed by her colleagues for her expertise and professionalism.”
  • A person might say, “I hold him in high esteem for his contributions to the community.”
  • In a discussion about role models, someone might mention, “I esteem Oprah Winfrey for her philanthropy and influence.”

29. Reckon

To believe or have an opinion about something.

  • For instance, “I reckon it’s going to rain later.”
  • In a conversation about future plans, someone might say, “I reckon I’ll go on a road trip next summer.”
  • A person might ask, “What do you reckon is the best solution to this problem?”

30. Concern

To feel anxious or troubled about something.

  • For example, “I have concerns about the safety of this new technology.”
  • In a discussion about a potential risk, someone might say, “This issue is a major concern.”
  • A person might express their concern by saying, “I’m really concerned about the impact of climate change.”

31. Cover

To deal with or address a particular situation or topic. “Cover” is often used to indicate taking responsibility for something or managing a situation.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I’ll cover the meeting while you’re away.”
  • In a conversation about a group project, a team member might offer, “I can cover the research portion.”
  • Someone discussing their workload might mention, “I have a lot on my plate, but I’ll make sure to cover everything.”

32. Treat of

To talk about or address a specific subject or issue. “Treat of” is often used to indicate focusing on a particular topic or problem.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Today, we will treat of the causes of the American Revolution.”
  • In a book review, a critic might comment, “The author effectively treats of the complexities of human relationships.”
  • A presenter might announce, “In this session, we will treat of the latest advancements in technology.”

33. Pertain to

To be relevant or connected to a particular subject or matter. “Pertain to” is often used to indicate the relationship or connection between two things.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “This evidence does not pertain to the case.”
  • In a discussion about health, a doctor might explain, “Diet and exercise directly pertain to maintaining a healthy lifestyle.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “How does this chapter pertain to our previous lesson?”

34. Include

To have or contain as part of a whole. “Include” is often used to indicate the presence or involvement of something or someone.

  • For instance, a menu might state, “Our dinner special includes an appetizer, main course, and dessert.”
  • In a job description, an employer might specify, “The responsibilities of this role include managing a team and coordinating projects.”
  • A teacher might inform their students, “The exam will include questions from chapters 1-5.”

35. Relate to

To have a connection or association with a particular subject or topic. “Relate to” is often used to indicate understanding or empathy towards something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can relate to the struggles of being a single parent.”
  • In a discussion about literature, a reader might comment, “I find it easy to relate to the main character’s emotions.”
  • A therapist might reassure their client, “Your experiences are valid, and many others can relate to what you’re going through.”

36. Present

When something “presents” in relation to a topic or situation, it means that it is connected or relevant to it. This term is often used to describe something that is currently happening or being discussed.

  • For example, in a conversation about climate change, someone might say, “The rising temperatures present a significant challenge.”
  • In a business meeting, a presenter might state, “I would like to present some new ideas for our marketing strategy.”
  • A news article might discuss how a recent study presents evidence for a particular theory.
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37. Have to do with

When something “has to do with” a particular topic or situation, it means that it is connected or relevant to it. This term is often used to describe the relationship between two things or to explain why something is important in a given context.

  • For instance, in a discussion about nutrition, someone might say, “What you eat has a lot to do with your overall health.”
  • In a literature class, a teacher might explain, “The theme of love has a lot to do with the plot of this novel.”
  • A journalist might write, “The recent scandal has a lot to do with the company’s declining reputation.”

38. Refer to

When something “refers to” a particular topic or situation, it means that it is related to or discusses that topic. This term is often used to describe the content or subject matter of something.

  • For example, in a book review, a critic might say, “The title of the novel refers to the protagonist’s struggle for identity.”
  • In a scientific paper, a researcher might state, “The term ‘gene expression’ refers to the process by which genetic information is used to create proteins.”
  • A teacher might explain to their students, “When I say ‘the Industrial Revolution,’ I am referring to a specific period of time in history.”

39. Specify

When someone “specifies” something, they provide specific details or information about it. This term is often used when someone needs to clarify or define something in more detail.

  • For instance, in a job description, an employer might specify the required qualifications and experience for the position.
  • In a recipe, the instructions might specify the exact measurements and cooking times for each ingredient.
  • A lawyer might ask a witness to specify the date and time of a particular event during a trial.

40. Act (toward)

When someone “acts” toward a particular topic or situation, it means that they are dealing with or addressing it in some way. This term is often used to describe how someone is handling or managing a specific issue or task.

  • For example, in a conflict resolution workshop, participants might learn how to act toward difficult conversations or disagreements.
  • In a customer service training, employees might be taught how to act toward customer complaints or concerns.
  • A manager might discuss how to act toward a challenging project or tight deadline with their team.

41. Engage (with)

To actively participate or interact with someone or something. This term is often used to describe the act of initiating or responding to a conversation or discussion.

  • For example, “Make sure to engage with your audience on social media to build a strong online presence.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s engage with our clients and gather feedback on the new product.”
  • A teacher might encourage students to “engage with the material by asking questions and participating in class discussions.”

42. Respond (to)

To answer or react to something that has been said or done. This term is commonly used in the context of communication, where someone acknowledges or addresses a message or request.

  • For instance, “Please respond to this email by the end of the day.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’ll respond to your question after I finish speaking.”
  • A customer service representative might ask, “How can I help you today? Please respond with your issue.”

43. React (to)

To respond or show a response to something that has happened or been said. This term emphasizes the action of reacting, often with emotions or a physical response.

  • For example, “She reacted to the news of her promotion with excitement and gratitude.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “The crowd erupted, reacting to the winning goal.”
  • A person watching a horror movie might react by screaming or covering their eyes during a scary scene.

44. Copes

To handle or manage a difficult situation or problem. This term refers to the ability to effectively handle challenges or stress and find a way to overcome them.

  • For instance, “She copes with stress by practicing mindfulness and meditation.”
  • In a therapy session, a counselor might discuss coping mechanisms to help a client deal with anxiety.
  • A friend might say, “I know it’s tough, but I believe in your ability to cope with this situation.”

45. Manages

To take charge or be responsible for a task or situation. This term implies the ability to effectively organize, coordinate, and control resources or activities to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, “He manages the team and ensures that projects are completed on time.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “She manages the company’s finances and budget.”
  • A parent might say, “I manage the household and make sure everything runs smoothly.”

46. Takes care of

This phrase is used to describe someone who handles a situation or problem effectively and efficiently. It implies that the person is capable of handling the task at hand.

  • For example, “She takes care of all the administrative tasks in the office.”
  • In a conversation about household chores, someone might say, “I’ll take care of the dishes tonight.”
  • A manager might delegate a task by saying, “Can you take care of this report for me?”

47. Handles

This term is used to describe someone who is responsible for managing or dealing with a situation or task. It implies that the person has the necessary skills or expertise to handle the job.

  • For instance, “He handles all the customer complaints and resolves them efficiently.”
  • In a discussion about project management, someone might say, “She handles the coordination of all the team members.”
  • A supervisor might assign a task by saying, “Can you handle this project?”

48. Deals with

This phrase is used to describe someone who is capable of handling or managing a situation or task effectively. It implies that the person has the necessary skills or knowledge to deal with the matter at hand.

  • For example, “He deals with all the financial aspects of the business.”
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might say, “She deals with difficult customers with patience and professionalism.”
  • A team leader might assign a task by saying, “Can you deal with this issue?”

49. Tackles

This term is used to describe someone who takes on a problem or task and works to resolve it. It implies that the person is proactive and willing to face challenges head-on.

  • For instance, “She tackles complex coding issues with determination and perseverance.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to tackle poverty and inequality.”
  • A teacher might encourage students by saying, “Let’s tackle this math problem together.”

50. Grapples with

This phrase is used to describe someone who is dealing with a difficult or challenging situation. It implies that the person is trying to understand or overcome the problem, but it may not be easy.

  • For example, “He grapples with his fear of public speaking.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “Many people grapple with anxiety and depression.”
  • A therapist might help a client by saying, “Let’s work together to grapple with your past traumas.”

51. Faces

This slang term refers to confronting or dealing with a difficult situation or problem head-on. It implies a sense of courage and determination in the face of adversity.

  • For example, “He finally faced his fears and enrolled in a public speaking class.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Facing your fears is the first step towards overcoming them.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Don’t run away from your problems, face them with confidence.”

52. Addresses

To “address” something means to take action or deal with a particular issue or problem. It implies a proactive approach to resolving or handling a situation.

  • For instance, “We need to address the rising crime rates in our city.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “Let’s address the concerns raised by our employees during the meeting.”
  • A therapist might advise their client, “It’s important to address the underlying issues that are causing your anxiety.”

53. Confronts

To “confront” something means to face it directly and deal with it, often in a assertive or direct manner. It can refer to addressing a problem or challenging someone’s behavior or actions.

  • For example, “She confronted her coworker about the mistake in the report.”
  • In a relationship, someone might say, “I need to confront my partner about their lack of communication.”
  • A parent might confront their child about their grades, saying, “We need to talk about your academic performance.”

54. Overcomes

To “overcome” something means to successfully deal with or overcome a difficulty, challenge, or obstacle. It implies a sense of triumph or victory in the face of adversity.

  • For instance, “She overcame her fear of public speaking and delivered a powerful presentation.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need to overcome our opponent’s strong defense to win the game.”
  • A person sharing their personal journey might say, “I overcame addiction and rebuilt my life.”

55. Resolves

To “resolve” something means to find a solution or reach a decision about a problem or conflict. It implies a sense of finding closure or coming to a resolution.

  • For example, “They resolved their differences and agreed to work together.”
  • In a customer service context, a representative might say, “I will do my best to resolve your issue.”
  • A mediator might help two parties resolve a dispute, saying, “Let’s find a compromise that works for both of you.”

56. Copes with

This phrase means to deal with or manage a difficult situation or problem. It implies finding a way to handle the issue without being overwhelmed or giving up.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have a lot on my plate right now, but I’ll cope with it.”
  • In a conversation about stress, a person might share, “I’ve developed some coping mechanisms to deal with anxiety.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “You’re strong, you can cope with whatever comes your way.”

57. Manages with

This phrase means to handle or deal with something using available resources or skills. It implies finding a way to make things work despite challenges or limitations.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I lost my job, but I’m managing with odd jobs for now.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might share, “I have a tight budget, but I manage with careful planning.”
  • A friend might offer advice by saying, “You can manage with the resources you have, just be creative.”

58. Takes on

This phrase means to accept or assume responsibility for a task, problem, or situation. It implies willingly embracing a challenge or taking charge of a situation.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll take on the project and make sure it gets done.”
  • In a conversation about leadership, a person might share, “A good leader takes on difficult tasks to set an example.”
  • A friend might encourage someone by saying, “You can take on this challenge, I believe in you.”

59. Handles with

This phrase means to deal with or manage a situation, task, or problem. It implies having the ability or skill to effectively address the issue at hand.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can handle this situation, no problem.”
  • In a discussion about work responsibilities, someone might share, “I handle multiple projects with ease.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “You’re capable, you can handle whatever comes your way.”

60. Deals with it

This phrase means to handle or address a situation, task, or problem. It implies taking action or finding a solution to resolve the issue.

  • For example, someone might say, “There’s a problem, but I’ll deal with it.”
  • In a conversation about conflict resolution, a person might share, “It’s important to address issues directly and deal with them.”
  • A friend might offer advice by saying, “Don’t avoid the problem, face it head-on and deal with it.”

61. Tackles with

This phrase is used to describe dealing with a difficult or challenging situation. It implies taking action and actively working towards a resolution.

  • For example, “I had to tackle with my overwhelming workload by prioritizing tasks.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The team tackled with their opponents’ aggressive offense.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’m learning to tackle with my fears and step out of my comfort zone.”

62. Grapples with it

To grapple with something means to struggle or wrestle with it. It implies a sense of difficulty or complexity in dealing with a particular issue or problem.

  • For instance, “She grapples with her decision to pursue a career in art or science.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, one might say, “We often grapple with the meaning of life and our purpose in the world.”
  • A person facing a moral dilemma might say, “I’m grappling with the decision to tell the truth or protect someone’s feelings.”

63. Faces it

To face something means to confront it directly, without avoiding or shying away from it. It implies a sense of bravery or determination in dealing with a particular challenge or issue.

  • For example, “She faced her fear of public speaking by joining a public speaking club.”
  • In a conflict resolution scenario, one might say, “We need to face the issue head-on and address the underlying problems.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Facing our insecurities is an important step towards self-acceptance and growth.”

64. Addresses it

To address something means to deal with or handle it. It implies taking action and finding a solution or resolution to a particular problem or issue.

  • For instance, “The company needs to address the concerns raised by its employees.”
  • In a relationship context, one might say, “We need to address the communication issues in our marriage.”
  • A person discussing a societal problem might say, “We must address the systemic issues that contribute to poverty and inequality.”

65. Confronts it

To confront something means to face it directly, often in a challenging or assertive manner. It implies a sense of courage and determination in dealing with a particular problem or situation.

  • For example, “He confronted his coworker about their disrespectful behavior.”
  • In a personal development context, one might say, “I need to confront my negative thought patterns and replace them with positive ones.”
  • A person discussing social justice might say, “We must confront the systemic racism that exists in our society and work towards meaningful change.”

66. Overcomes it

To overcome something means to successfully deal with or defeat a problem, challenge, or obstacle. It implies a sense of triumph or victory over the issue at hand.

  • For example, “She overcame her fear of public speaking and delivered a powerful presentation.”
  • In a motivational context, someone might say, “You can overcome any adversity if you believe in yourself.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Overcoming obstacles is an essential part of achieving success.”

67. Resolves it

To resolve something means to find a solution or answer to a problem or conflict. It implies a sense of reaching a satisfactory conclusion or outcome.

  • For instance, “They resolved their disagreement by having an open and honest conversation.”
  • In a technical context, someone might say, “We need to resolve this software bug before releasing the product.”
  • A person discussing conflict resolution might say, “Effective communication is key to resolving disputes and maintaining healthy relationships.”

68. Copes with it

To cope with something means to manage or deal with a difficult or challenging situation in a way that allows one to function and maintain emotional well-being. It implies finding strategies or mechanisms to handle the situation.

  • For example, “She copes with stress by practicing yoga and meditation.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might say, “Learning to cope with the demands of a busy career and personal life is essential.”
  • A person discussing mental health might say, “Developing healthy coping mechanisms is important for managing anxiety and depression.”

69. Manages with it

To manage with something means to handle or deal with a situation or problem, often with limited resources or options. It implies finding ways to navigate through the difficulties and make the best of the circumstances.

  • For instance, “They managed with the limited budget by prioritizing necessary expenses.”
  • In a discussion about time management, someone might say, “Learning to manage with the available time is crucial for productivity.”
  • A person discussing financial challenges might say, “Finding creative ways to manage with limited funds can help overcome financial difficulties.”

70. Takes on it

To take on something means to confront or tackle a problem or challenge directly. It implies a proactive approach and a willingness to engage with the issue at hand.

  • For example, “She took on the responsibility of leading the project and ensured its success.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Taking on new challenges is essential for self-improvement.”
  • A person discussing activism might say, “We need to take on the systemic issues and work towards meaningful change.”

71. Grab

To “grab” something means to quickly or forcefully obtain it. This slang term is often used when referring to getting a good deal or opportunity.

  • For example, “I managed to grab the last pair of shoes on sale.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to grab that new video game when it’s released.”
  • In a discussion about shopping, someone might mention, “I always grab the best deals during Black Friday.”

72. Hook

To “hook” something means to acquire or obtain it. This slang term is commonly used when talking about getting a good deal or finding something desirable.

  • For instance, “I managed to hook a great deal on a vacation package.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m going to try and hook a ticket to the concert.”
  • In a conversation about finding rare items, a person might mention, “I hooked a vintage vinyl record at a flea market.”

73. Secure

To “secure” something means to obtain or acquire it. This slang term is often used when talking about successfully getting a deal or opportunity.

  • For example, “I secured a discount on the hotel reservation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to secure a job offer from that company.”
  • In a discussion about winning a bidding war, someone might mention, “I managed to secure the winning bid on the house.”

74. Procure

To “procure” something means to obtain or acquire it. This slang term is commonly used when talking about successfully getting something, especially in a skillful or clever way.

  • For instance, “I managed to procure a rare collectible at an auction.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m going to try and procure tickets to the sold-out show.”
  • In a conversation about finding unique items, a person might mention, “I procured an antique necklace from a vintage store.”

75. Land

To “land” something means to acquire or obtain it. This slang term is often used when referring to successfully getting a deal or opportunity.

  • For example, “I landed a job offer from my dream company.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to land a sponsorship for my event.”
  • In a discussion about winning a competition, someone might mention, “I landed first place in the contest.”

76. Get hold of

To acquire or obtain something, often with some effort or difficulty. “Get hold of” is a colloquial term used to express the action of obtaining something.

  • For example, “I finally managed to get hold of tickets to the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I need to get hold of a copy of that book before it sells out.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you know where I can get hold of some good quality furniture?”

77. Nail

To successfully achieve or accomplish something. “Nail” is a slang term often used to describe the act of successfully completing a task or goal.

  • For instance, “I nailed that presentation and got a promotion.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to nail this job interview to secure the position.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I nailed that difficult dance routine during the performance!”

78. Snatch

To quickly and forcefully take or seize something. “Snatch” is a slang term often used to describe the act of grabbing something, usually in a swift and unexpected manner.

  • For example, “He snatched the phone out of my hand.”
  • A person might say, “I managed to snatch the last pair of shoes before they sold out.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She snatched the victory from her opponent in the final seconds of the game!”

79. Snap up

To quickly and eagerly take advantage of an opportunity or acquire something. “Snap up” is a colloquial term used to describe the act of seizing an opportunity or grabbing something before it’s gone.

  • For instance, “I snapped up the chance to buy tickets to the concert.”
  • Someone might say, “You should snap up that job offer before someone else does.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She snapped up the last piece of cake before anyone else could grab it!”

80. Bag a bargain

To successfully obtain or acquire something at a lower price or with favorable terms. “Bag a bargain” is a slang term often used to describe the act of getting a good deal or finding something at a discounted price.

  • For example, “I managed to bag a bargain on this designer handbag.”
  • A person might say, “I always try to shop during sales to bag a bargain.”
  • Another might exclaim, “She really knows how to bag a bargain and save money!”

81. Seize

This term refers to taking control or possession of something, often forcefully or quickly. It can be used in various contexts, including deals and negotiations.

  • For example, a businessperson might say, “We need to seize this opportunity before our competitors do.”
  • In a discussion about a successful business venture, someone might comment, “They were able to seize the market and dominate their industry.”
  • A team member might suggest, “Let’s seize the moment and present our proposal to the client.”

82. Claim

To claim something means to assert ownership or the right to something. It can also refer to making a demand or stating a belief.

  • For instance, in a negotiation, one party might claim that they deserve a larger share of the profits.
  • In a business setting, a salesperson might claim that their product is the best in the market.
  • A person might claim that they have the skills and experience necessary for a particular job.
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83. Garner

Garner means to collect or gather something, often in a gradual or cumulative way. It can be used in the context of deals and negotiations to refer to the accumulation of resources or support.

  • For example, a politician might garner support from various interest groups.
  • In a sales meeting, a team might discuss strategies to garner more customers.
  • A business might use marketing campaigns to garner attention and increase brand awareness.

84. Extract

To extract means to obtain or derive something, often through effort or skill. It can be used in the context of deals and negotiations to refer to obtaining specific information or benefits.

  • For instance, a lawyer might extract a confession from a witness during cross-examination.
  • In a business negotiation, one party might try to extract more favorable terms.
  • A salesperson might use persuasive techniques to extract a commitment from a potential customer.

85. Attain

Attain means to achieve or reach a goal or objective. It can be used in the context of deals and negotiations to refer to achieving a desired outcome.

  • For example, a company might strive to attain a certain level of sales by the end of the year.
  • In a business partnership, both parties might work together to attain mutual success.
  • A team might set goals and work hard to attain them in order to meet a deadline.

86. Acquire

This term means to obtain or gain possession of something. It is often used in a business or financial context.

  • For example, “The company plans to acquire a smaller competitor.”
  • In a discussion about real estate, someone might say, “I’m looking to acquire some investment properties.”
  • A person discussing collecting rare items might mention, “I recently acquired a valuable antique.”

87. Snaffle

To snaffle something means to quickly and eagerly grab or seize it. It can also imply taking something without permission or in a sneaky manner.

  • For instance, “She snaffled the last piece of cake before anyone else could get to it.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might say, “I snaffled a great deal on those shoes.”
  • A person describing a theft might say, “The thief snaffled the wallet and disappeared into the crowd.”

88. Scoop up

To scoop up something means to quickly and decisively grab or seize it. It implies a swift and efficient action.

  • For example, “He scooped up the opportunity to invest in the startup.”
  • In a discussion about sales, someone might say, “I scooped up that limited edition item before it sold out.”
  • A person describing a successful negotiation might mention, “I managed to scoop up a great discount on that car.”

89. Take advantage of

To take advantage of something means to make full use of it for personal gain or benefit. It can also imply exploiting a situation or someone’s vulnerability.

  • For instance, “He took advantage of the sale to buy a new TV.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I took advantage of a last-minute deal and booked a trip.”
  • A person discussing business tactics might mention, “Successful entrepreneurs know how to take advantage of market trends.”

90. Make a killing

To make a killing means to earn a large amount of money or profit greatly from a deal or investment. It implies achieving a significant financial gain.

  • For example, “She made a killing by investing in cryptocurrency.”
  • In a discussion about the stock market, someone might say, “I made a killing on that tech stock.”
  • A person describing a successful business venture might mention, “We made a killing with our new product launch.”

91. Strike a deal

To successfully negotiate and come to an agreement with another party. This phrase is often used in business or negotiation contexts.

  • For example, “After hours of negotiation, they were finally able to strike a deal.”
  • A salesperson might say, “I’m confident we can strike a deal that works for both parties.”
  • In a discussion about business partnerships, someone might mention, “Finding the right company to strike a deal with can be a game-changer.”

92. Wheel and deal

To engage in clever and strategic negotiations, often with the goal of achieving personal gain or advantage. This phrase is typically used to describe someone who is skilled at making deals and maneuvering in business or other situations.

  • For instance, “He’s known for his ability to wheel and deal in the real estate market.”
  • A journalist might write, “The politician was known to wheel and deal behind closed doors.”
  • In a discussion about successful entrepreneurs, someone might say, “They got to where they are today by wheeling and dealing.”

93. Close a deal

To successfully complete or finalize a business transaction or negotiation. This phrase is often used in sales or business contexts to indicate that an agreement has been reached and all necessary steps have been taken to make it official.

  • For example, “After weeks of negotiations, they were finally able to close the deal.”
  • A salesperson might say, “I’m confident we can close the deal by the end of the month.”
  • In a discussion about successful business strategies, someone might mention, “Knowing how to effectively close a deal is a crucial skill.”

94. Cut a deal

To make an agreement or arrangement, often by making compromises or concessions. This phrase is commonly used in legal or negotiation contexts.

  • For instance, “The two parties were able to cut a deal after hours of mediation.”
  • A lawyer might advise their client, “If you want to avoid a lengthy trial, it may be best to try to cut a deal.”
  • In a discussion about resolving conflicts, someone might say, “Sometimes you have to be willing to cut a deal in order to find a solution.”

95. Ink a deal

To officially sign or execute a business agreement. This phrase is often used to describe the final step in the process of making a deal, when all terms and conditions have been agreed upon and the agreement is ready to be signed.

  • For example, “They met with their lawyers to ink the deal and make it official.”
  • A businessperson might say, “Once we ink the deal, we can start moving forward with the project.”
  • In a discussion about successful business ventures, someone might mention, “They were able to ink a deal with a major investor, which helped launch their company to success.”