Top 55 Slang For Defend – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to standing up for what you believe in, having the right slang can make all the difference. In this article, we’ve rounded up some of the coolest and most effective slang terms for defend. Whether you’re looking to show support for a friend or protect your own boundaries, we’ve got you covered with the latest and greatest in defending language. So, gear up and get ready to enhance your vocabulary with our list of top slang for defend!

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1. Back up

When someone is being criticized or attacked, you can “back them up” by defending their actions or beliefs.

  • For example, if a friend is being accused of something they didn’t do, you might say, “I’ll back you up and vouch for your innocence.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “I agree with John’s proposal. Let’s all back him up and show our support.”
  • If someone is being bullied, you could say, “Don’t worry, I’ll back you up and confront the bully.”

2. Stand up for

To “stand up for” someone means to support and defend them, especially when they are being mistreated or facing unfair treatment.

  • For instance, if you witness someone being bullied, you might step in and say, “I’m going to stand up for them and tell the bully to back off.”
  • In a heated debate, you might say, “I’ll stand up for my beliefs and argue my point until the end.”
  • If a friend is being criticized, you could say, “I’ll stand up for you and make sure your side of the story is heard.”

3. Have someone’s back

When you “have someone’s back,” you are ready to support and defend them in any situation.

  • For example, if a friend is going through a tough time, you might say, “Don’t worry, I’ve got your back. I’ll be there for you.”
  • In a team project, you could say, “I’ve got your back. If anyone tries to undermine your work, I’ll defend your contributions.”
  • If someone is being criticized, you might assure them, “I’ll always have your back and stand up for you.”

4. Stick up for

To “stick up for” someone means to defend and support them, even when others may disagree or criticize.

  • For instance, if a friend is being unfairly accused, you might say, “I’ll stick up for you and make sure the truth is known.”
  • In a group discussion, you could say, “I’ll stick up for your idea and argue its merits.”
  • If someone is being bullied, you might say, “I won’t tolerate bullying. I’ll stick up for you and confront the bully.”

5. Protect

To “protect” someone means to defend and safeguard them from any potential harm or danger.

  • For example, if you see someone about to be hit by a ball, you might shout, “Look out!” and rush to protect them.
  • In a dangerous situation, you might say, “I’ll protect you. Stay behind me and I’ll make sure you’re safe.”
  • If someone is being threatened, you could say, “I won’t let anything happen to you. I’ll protect you no matter what.”

6. Shield

To shield means to protect or defend someone or something from harm or danger. It can also refer to providing support or covering for someone.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I will always shield my children from harm.”
  • In a sports context, a player might say, “I need my teammates to shield me from the opposing defenders.”
  • A friend might offer, “I’ll shield you from any negative comments or criticism.”

7. Guard

To guard means to protect or keep watch over someone or something. It can also refer to being cautious or vigilant.

  • For instance, a security guard might say, “I am here to guard the premises and ensure everyone’s safety.”
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might advise, “Always guard your personal information and be cautious of strangers.”
  • A parent might remind their child, “I will always guard you and make sure you’re safe.”

8. Cover

To cover means to defend or protect someone or something from harm or danger. It can also refer to taking responsibility or providing support.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I will cover my comrades and ensure their safety.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “We need to cover for each other and support our teammates.”
  • A friend might offer, “I’ll cover for you if you need to take a break or step away.”

9. Uphold

To uphold means to support or defend a principle, belief, or value. It can also refer to maintaining or preserving something.

  • For instance, a lawyer might say, “I will uphold the rights of my client and ensure justice is served.”
  • In a debate about ethics, someone might argue, “We should uphold the importance of honesty and integrity.”
  • A teacher might emphasize, “It’s important to uphold the rules and standards of the classroom.”

10. Advocate

To advocate means to publicly support or promote a cause, idea, or action. It can also refer to speaking or acting in favor of someone or something.

  • For example, a social activist might say, “I advocate for equal rights and justice.”
  • In a discussion about environmental issues, someone might advocate for recycling and sustainable practices.
  • A friend might say, “I will advocate for you and your interests in this matter.”

11. Champion

To champion something means to actively support or advocate for it. It implies taking a strong stance in favor of a cause or idea.

  • For example, “She champions equal rights for all.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “He champions policies that benefit the working class.”
  • A sports fan might declare, “I champion my team no matter what.”

12. Rally for

To rally for something means to gather or come together in support of a cause or idea. It implies showing solidarity and unity with others who share the same goal.

  • For instance, “They rallied for animal rights at the city park.”
  • A group of activists might organize a protest and say, “Join us as we rally for climate change action.”
  • In a political context, someone might declare, “I’m rallying for my candidate in the upcoming election.”

13. Side with

To side with someone or something means to align with or support them in a dispute or conflict. It implies choosing a particular position or viewpoint.

  • For example, “She always sides with the underdog.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I side with the argument that promotes equality.”
  • A friend might declare, “I will always side with you, no matter what.”

14. Fight for

To fight for something means to defend or advocate for it, often in the face of opposition or adversity. It implies a determination to protect or promote a cause.

  • For instance, “They fought for their right to be heard.”
  • In a social justice context, someone might say, “We must fight for equality and justice.”
  • A parent might declare, “I will fight for my child’s well-being.”

15. Secure

To secure something means to ensure or protect it from harm or loss. It implies taking measures to guarantee the safety or preservation of something.

  • For example, “They secured their home with a high-tech alarm system.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We must secure our financial future.”
  • A government official might declare, “Our priority is to secure the nation’s borders.”

16. Safeguard

To safeguard means to protect or defend something or someone from harm or danger. It implies taking measures to ensure safety and security.

  • For example, “It’s important to safeguard your personal information online.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might say, “We need to safeguard our networks from potential hackers.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Always wear a helmet to safeguard against head injuries while riding a bike.”

17. Insulate

To insulate means to protect or shield something or someone from outside influences or unwanted effects. It implies creating a barrier to prevent harm or damage.

  • For instance, “The thick walls of the house insulate it from outside noise.”
  • In a conversation about emotional well-being, someone might suggest, “Practice self-care activities to insulate yourself from stress.”
  • A person discussing energy efficiency might say, “Proper insulation in your home can help insulate it from extreme temperatures and reduce energy consumption.”

18. Fortify

To fortify means to strengthen or reinforce something or someone, especially against potential threats or attacks. It implies making something more resistant or resilient.

  • For example, “The soldiers fortified their position by building barricades.”
  • In a discussion about personal development, someone might say, “Reading books can fortify your knowledge and broaden your perspective.”
  • A coach might encourage their team, “Let’s focus on our weaknesses and work together to fortify our defense.”

19. Brace

To brace means to prepare oneself mentally or physically for a difficult or challenging situation. It implies getting ready to face adversity or to defend oneself.

  • For instance, “She braced herself for the impact of the collision.”
  • In a conversation about upcoming exams, someone might say, “I need to brace myself and study hard.”
  • A person discussing a potential conflict might advise, “It’s important to brace yourself for difficult conversations and remain calm.”

20. Resist

To resist means to fight against or oppose something or someone. It implies refusing to give in or be affected by external pressures or influences.

  • For example, “The protesters resisted the government’s decision and demanded change.”
  • In a discussion about temptation, someone might say, “I’m trying to resist the urge to eat junk food.”
  • A person advocating for social justice might argue, “We must resist systemic oppression and work towards equality.”

21. Oppose

To actively resist or go against something or someone. “Oppose” implies a strong disagreement or rejection of an idea, action, or person.

  • For example, if someone suggests a new policy, you might say, “I oppose this idea because it will have negative consequences.”
  • In a political debate, one candidate might say, “I strongly oppose my opponent’s stance on healthcare.”
  • A group of protesters might chant, “Oppose injustice! Oppose inequality!”

22. Repel

To push back or keep away something or someone. “Repel” often refers to a physical or metaphorical force that prevents an attack or invasion.

  • For instance, if you use bug spray to keep mosquitoes away, you are repelling them.
  • In a war, soldiers might repel enemy forces to protect their territory.
  • A person might say, “The strong smell of garlic can repel vampires.”

23. Ward off

To prevent or avoid something from happening, especially by taking action in advance. “Ward off” suggests a proactive defense to keep away harm or danger.

  • For example, if you wear sunscreen to protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays, you are warding off potential sunburn.
  • In folklore, people might wear a talisman or amulet to ward off evil spirits.
  • A person might say, “I take vitamin C to ward off colds during flu season.”

24. Screen

To protect or provide cover for someone or something. “Screen” can refer to physically blocking or hiding, as well as metaphorically protecting from harm or danger.

  • For instance, if you use a screen door to keep insects out of your house, you are screening them.
  • In a movie, a bodyguard might screen a celebrity from the paparazzi.
  • A person might say, “I always screen my calls to avoid telemarketers.”

25. Buffer

To create a barrier or protective layer between two things or people. “Buffer” suggests a space or zone that absorbs or lessens the impact of a potential threat or conflict.

  • For example, if you place a towel between a fragile object and a hard surface, you are using a buffer to prevent damage.
  • In a negotiation, a mediator might act as a buffer between two parties to facilitate communication.
  • A person might say, “I need some alone time to relax and buffer myself from the stress of work.”

26. Deflect

To avoid answering a question or addressing an issue directly. “Deflect” is often used when someone tries to shift the focus away from themselves or their actions.

  • For example, a politician might deflect a difficult question by talking about a different topic.
  • In a conversation about responsibility, someone might say, “Don’t try to deflect blame onto others.”
  • A person might accuse someone of deflecting criticism by saying, “They always try to deflect any negative feedback.”

27. Cover for

To provide an alibi or excuse for someone’s actions. “Cover for” is often used when someone defends or supports another person’s behavior, even if it may be questionable.

  • For instance, a friend might cover for someone by saying they were together during a time they were actually doing something else.
  • In a discussion about loyalty, someone might say, “I’ll always cover for my friends, no matter what.”
  • A person might accuse someone of covering for a colleague’s mistakes by saying, “They always protect each other.”

28. Advocate for

To actively support or promote a cause, belief, or person. “Advocate for” is often used when someone defends or speaks out in favor of something or someone they believe in.

  • For example, a lawyer might advocate for their client in court.
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “I advocate for equal rights for all.”
  • A person might encourage others to advocate for a cause by saying, “We need to stand up and advocate for change.”

29. Stand by

To remain loyal or committed to someone or something. “Stand by” is often used when someone defends or stands up for another person, even in difficult or challenging situations.

  • For instance, a friend might stand by someone accused of a crime, believing in their innocence.
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I’ll always stand by my partner, no matter what.”
  • A person might encourage others to stand by their principles by saying, “Don’t let anyone pressure you into compromising your values.”

30. Take up for

To protect or support someone in the face of criticism or attack. “Take up for” is often used when someone stands up for another person, especially when they are being treated unfairly.

  • For example, a sibling might take up for their younger brother or sister if they are being bullied.
  • In a discussion about justice, someone might say, “We need to take up for those who can’t defend themselves.”
  • A person might criticize someone for not taking up for a friend by saying, “You should have defended them instead of staying silent.”

31. Validate

To validate means to confirm or support the truth or accuracy of something. It can also mean to give official approval or authorization. This term is often used to express support or agreement with someone or their ideas.

  • For example, someone might say, “I really appreciate you validating my feelings about this situation.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, a person might comment, “I can’t believe there are still people who don’t validate climate change.”
  • Another might say, “I validate your decision to pursue your dreams, even if others don’t understand.”

32. Endorse

To endorse means to publicly support or recommend something or someone. It can also mean to give approval or permission. This term is often used in the context of endorsing a product, a political candidate, or a particular idea.

  • For instance, a celebrity might endorse a brand by appearing in their advertisements.
  • In a political campaign, a candidate might say, “I am proud to be endorsed by the local teachers’ union.”
  • Another might comment, “I endorse the idea of universal healthcare for all.”

33. Support

To support means to provide assistance, encouragement, or help to someone. It can also mean to hold up or bear the weight of something. This term is often used to express solidarity or to offer help to someone in need.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I will always support you, no matter what.”
  • In a discussion about mental health, someone might comment, “It’s important to support those who are struggling.”
  • Another might say, “I support your decision to follow your passion, even if it’s not the traditional path.”

34. Defend

To defend means to protect, support, or argue in favor of someone or something. It can also mean to take action to prevent harm or danger. This term is often used to express the act of standing up for oneself or others.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I will defend my rights until the end.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “I strongly defend the idea that everyone deserves equal opportunities.”
  • Another might comment, “We must defend those who cannot defend themselves.”

35. Watch over

To watch over means to protect, guard, or supervise someone or something. It can also mean to keep a close watch or monitor a situation. This term is often used to express the act of looking out for someone’s well-being or safety.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I will always watch over you, no matter how old you are.”
  • In a neighborhood watch program, participants are encouraged to watch over their community.
  • Another might comment, “I’ll watch over the house while you’re on vacation to ensure everything is safe.”

36. Defend the honor

This phrase is used to describe standing up for one’s reputation or integrity in the face of criticism or attack.

  • For example, “He defended his honor by confronting the person spreading false rumors.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “I will defend my honor until the end.”
  • When someone is falsely accused, they might declare, “I will not let anyone tarnish my honor.”

37. Cover up

This slang phrase refers to hiding or protecting someone or something, often to prevent negative consequences or exposure.

  • For instance, in a scandal, someone might say, “They tried to cover up the truth to protect their reputation.”
  • A person involved in illegal activities might say, “We need to cover up our tracks to avoid getting caught.”
  • When someone helps a friend avoid trouble, they might say, “I covered up for him because I didn’t want him to get in trouble.”

38. Rally around

This phrase is used to describe the act of coming together as a group to support or defend someone or something.

  • For example, “The community rallied around the family after their house burned down.”
  • In a time of crisis, a leader might say, “We need to rally around each other and overcome this challenge.”
  • When a team is facing a tough opponent, the coach might say, “It’s time to rally around each other and show our strength.”

39. Take a stand

This slang phrase means to make a clear and firm declaration or position in support of a particular cause or belief.

  • For instance, “She took a stand against injustice and joined the protest.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “It’s time for us to take a stand and fight for what we believe in.”
  • When someone refuses to compromise their values, they might declare, “I will take a stand for what is right, no matter the consequences.”

40. Protect the fort

This slang phrase means to defend one’s territory, position, or interests from threats or attacks.

  • For example, “He protected the fort by implementing strict security measures.”
  • In a competitive situation, someone might say, “We need to protect the fort and not let our rivals gain an advantage.”
  • When someone is determined to defend their position, they might declare, “I will protect the fort and not let anyone undermine me.”

41. Guard the gate

This phrase is often used metaphorically to mean protecting or defending something important or valuable. It can also refer to physically guarding a gate or entrance.

  • For example, in a sports context, a coach might say, “Our defense needs to guard the gate and prevent the opposing team from scoring.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “We need to guard the gate and protect our company’s trade secrets.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order, “Guard the gate and don’t let any unauthorized personnel enter.”

42. Watch the perimeter

This phrase is commonly used in military or security contexts to mean keeping a close eye on the area surrounding a specific location. It can also be used metaphorically to mean staying vigilant and alert.

  • For instance, a security guard might be instructed, “Watch the perimeter and report any suspicious activity.”
  • In a camping or outdoor adventure, someone might say, “We need to watch the perimeter and make sure no wild animals come near our camp.”
  • In a business context, a manager might advise, “Watch the perimeter and be aware of any potential competitors entering the market.”

43. Defend the line

This phrase is often used in sports, particularly team sports like soccer or American football, to mean protecting a specific area or position on the field. It can also be used metaphorically to mean defending a particular stance or viewpoint.

  • For example, a soccer coach might instruct the defenders, “Defend the line and don’t let the opposing team score.”
  • In a political debate, someone might say, “I will defend the line on this issue and argue for stricter regulations.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order, “Defend the line and hold your position at all costs.”

44. Shield from harm

This phrase is used to mean protecting someone or something from potential danger or harm. It can also be used metaphorically to mean providing support or defense in a non-physical sense.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I will shield my child from harm and do everything to keep them safe.”
  • In a cybersecurity context, someone might say, “We need to shield our network from harm by implementing strong security measures.”
  • In a friendship, someone might say, “I will shield you from harm and be there for you in difficult times.”

45. Cover the flank

This phrase is often used in military or tactical contexts to mean protecting the side or flank of a group or formation. It can also be used metaphorically to mean providing support or protection in a broader sense.

  • For example, a military commander might order, “Cover the flank and prevent the enemy from flanking our position.”
  • In a team project, someone might say, “I will cover your flank and support you in case any issues arise.”
  • In a political campaign, a campaign manager might advise, “We need to cover the flank and address any potential attacks from the opposition.”

46. Defend the title

This phrase is often used in sports to describe a team or individual’s effort to retain their title or championship. It refers to the act of defending and maintaining their position as the reigning champions.

  • For example, in a post-game interview, a coach might say, “Our team is ready to defend the title and show everyone why we’re the best.”
  • A sports commentator might discuss a team’s chances of defending the title by saying, “They have a strong roster and a winning mentality.”
  • A fan might express their excitement by saying, “I can’t wait to see our team defend the title against their rivals.”

47. Uphold the law

This phrase refers to the act of supporting and ensuring the enforcement of laws and regulations. It implies a sense of responsibility and commitment to maintaining a just and lawful society.

  • For instance, a police officer might say, “It is our duty to uphold the law and protect the community.”
  • During a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence clearly shows that my client did not uphold the law in this situation.”
  • A citizen discussing the importance of law and order might say, “We must all do our part to uphold the law and contribute to a safe society.”

48. Defend the crown

This phrase is often used in reference to a reigning monarch or royal family. It signifies the act of defending and preserving their position of power and authority.

  • For example, a royal spokesperson might state, “The royal family is committed to defending the crown and serving the country.”
  • During a ceremonial event, a member of the royal family might say, “I am honored to defend the crown and uphold our traditions.”
  • A historian discussing the role of monarchs might mention, “Throughout history, many rulers have faced challenges in defending the crown and maintaining their legitimacy.”

49. Keep safe

This phrase is a simple and direct way of expressing the act of protecting someone or something from danger or harm. It implies a sense of responsibility and care for the well-being of others.

  • For instance, a parent might tell their child, “Make sure to keep safe and look both ways before crossing the street.”
  • A friend might offer advice by saying, “If you’re going out alone at night, make sure to keep safe and stay in well-lit areas.”
  • During a natural disaster, a public service announcement might remind people to “take necessary precautions to keep safe and secure their belongings.”

50. Defend the goal

This phrase is often used in sports, particularly in team-based games like soccer or hockey, to describe the act of defending the team’s goal or objective. It refers to the efforts made by players to prevent the opposing team from scoring.

  • For example, a coach might give instructions to the defenders by saying, “Your main job is to defend the goal and prevent any shots from getting through.”
  • A sports commentator might analyze a player’s defensive skills by saying, “He is known for his ability to defend the goal and make crucial saves.”
  • A fan might cheer for the team by shouting, “Defend the goal! Don’t let them score!”

51. Stand guard

This phrase means to actively protect or watch over something or someone. It can refer to physically standing in a designated area to ensure security or vigilance.

  • For example, a security guard might be instructed to “stand guard at the entrance.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might be told to “stand guard and watch for any enemy activity.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Stand guard by the door and let me know if anyone comes in.”

52. Defend the truth

This phrase means to support or protect the truth in a given situation. It implies standing up for what is right and ensuring that the truth is not compromised or distorted.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “It is our duty to defend the truth and report accurate information.”
  • In a courtroom, a lawyer might argue, “I will defend the truth and present evidence that supports my client’s innocence.”
  • A friend might say, “I will always defend the truth, even if it means confronting difficult situations.”

53. Defend the weak

This phrase means to safeguard or support those who are in a disadvantaged or vulnerable position. It implies taking action to ensure their safety and well-being.

  • For example, a social worker might say, “It is our responsibility to defend the weak and advocate for their rights.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might encourage students to “stand up against bullying and defend the weak.”
  • A community leader might organize a campaign to “defend the weak and provide resources for those in need.”
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54. Defend the crown jewels

This phrase is often used metaphorically to refer to protecting something of great value or importance. It implies taking measures to ensure the safety and preservation of valuable assets.

  • For instance, a company might invest in advanced security systems to “defend the crown jewels of their intellectual property.”
  • In a historical context, a curator might say, “Our mission is to defend the crown jewels and preserve them for future generations.”
  • A government official might emphasize the need to “defend the crown jewels of national heritage and cultural artifacts.”

55. Defend the honor code

This phrase refers to maintaining and enforcing a set of ethical standards or principles. It implies taking action to ensure that these principles are respected and followed.

  • For example, a student might say, “It is our duty to defend the honor code and report any violations.”
  • In a professional setting, an organization might have policies in place to “defend the honor code and promote a culture of integrity.”
  • A military officer might emphasize the importance of “defending the honor code and upholding the values of the military.”