Top 67 Slang For Define – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying current with the latest lingo, understanding the slang for define can be crucial in navigating today’s conversations. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to up your cool factor, we’ve got you covered with a rundown of the trendiest terms that are shaping the way we communicate. So, buckle up and get ready to expand your vocabulary with our definitive guide to the most buzzworthy slang for define out there!

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1. Break it down

To break something down means to explain or analyze it in a clear and simple manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me break down the concept of photosynthesis for you.”
  • In a dance tutorial, the instructor might say, “Now I’m going to break down the choreography step by step.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “Let’s break down the play and see what went wrong.”

2. Spell it out

To spell something out means to explain it in a very clear and detailed way, leaving no room for misunderstanding.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I need to spell out the expectations for this project.”
  • In a relationship discussion, one partner might say, “Can you please spell out what you need from me?”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Let me spell out the instructions for the assignment.”

3. Lay it out

To lay something out means to present or explain it in a clear and organized manner.

  • For example, a designer might say, “Let me lay out the plan for the new website.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “I’m going to lay out the facts and figures for this proposal.”
  • A chef might say, “Let me lay out the steps to make this recipe.”

4. Give the lowdown

To give the lowdown means to provide all the important or necessary information about a particular topic.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Give me the lowdown on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a job interview, the interviewer might say, “Can you give me the lowdown on your previous work experience?”
  • A travel blogger might provide the lowdown on a popular tourist destination in their latest post.

5. Put it in layman’s terms

To put something in layman’s terms means to explain it using simple language that can be easily understood by someone who is not an expert in the field.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “Let me put this medical diagnosis in layman’s terms.”
  • In a technology tutorial, the instructor might say, “I’ll put the complex coding process in layman’s terms.”
  • A scientist might explain a complex theory by saying, “To put it in layman’s terms, this is how gravity works.”

6. Break it down for me

When someone says “break it down for me,” they are asking for a clear and concise explanation of something. This phrase is often used when trying to understand complex concepts or instructions.

  • For example, if someone is confused about a math problem, they might say, “Can you break it down for me step by step?”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “Can you break down the sales report for me?”
  • When discussing a political issue, one person might say, “I don’t understand the different viewpoints. Can you break it down for me?”

7. Give me the scoop

When someone says “give me the scoop,” they are asking for the latest information or details about a situation or topic. This phrase is often used when wanting to be kept up to date or informed.

  • For instance, if someone missed a gossip or news story, they might ask, “Hey, give me the scoop. What happened?”
  • When discussing a celebrity’s personal life, someone might say, “I heard there’s some drama. Give me the scoop!”
  • If someone wants to know the details of an upcoming event, they might ask, “What’s the scoop on the party this weekend?”

8. Give me the 411

When someone says “give me the 411,” they are asking for the information or details about something. This phrase is often used when wanting to be informed or updated on a specific topic.

  • For example, if someone is planning a trip to a new city, they might ask a local, “Can you give me the 411 on the best places to eat?”
  • When discussing a new movie release, someone might say, “I haven’t heard anything about that film. Give me the 411!”
  • If someone wants to know the inside scoop on a company, they might ask, “Can you give me the 411 on what it’s like to work there?”

9. Fill me in

When someone says “fill me in,” they are asking for the missing information or to be updated on a situation or topic they are not aware of. This phrase is often used when wanting to catch up or be brought up to speed.

  • For instance, if someone missed a meeting at work, they might say, “Can you fill me in on what I missed?”
  • When discussing a TV show, someone might say, “I haven’t watched the latest episode. Can you fill me in on what happened?”
  • If someone wants to know the details of a plan or event, they might ask, “Can you fill me in on the details?”

10. Clue me in

When someone says “clue me in,” they are asking for the necessary information or insight about a situation or topic. This phrase is often used when wanting to be informed or included in a conversation or decision.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a secret project, they might say, “Clue me in. What’s going on?”
  • When discussing a complicated issue, someone might say, “I’m not familiar with that topic. Can you clue me in?”
  • If someone wants to be included in a plan or decision, they might ask, “Can you clue me in on what’s happening?”

11. Enlighten me

This phrase is used when someone wants to be provided with information or understanding about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is confused about a concept, they might say, “Can you enlighten me on how this works?”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might ask, “Could you enlighten me on the different perspectives involved?”
  • If someone is curious about a historical event, they might say, “Enlighten me on the details of that event.”

12. Shed some light on

This phrase means to offer insight or explanation that helps to clarify a situation or topic.

  • For instance, if someone is unsure about a decision, they might ask, “Can you shed some light on the pros and cons?”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious event, someone might say, “We need someone to shed some light on what really happened.”
  • If someone is struggling to understand a complex concept, they might ask, “Could you shed some light on the underlying principles?”

13. Tell me what’s what

This phrase is used to request honest and straightforward information or explanation about a matter.

  • For example, if someone is confused about a situation, they might ask, “Can you tell me what’s what?”
  • In a discussion about conflicting opinions, someone might say, “I just want someone to tell me what’s what.”
  • If someone is unsure about the details of a plan, they might ask, “Could you tell me what’s what so I can make an informed decision?”

14. Let me in on

This phrase is used to express a desire to be included or informed about something.

  • For instance, if someone is discussing a secret, they might say, “Come on, let me in on the secret!”
  • In a conversation about a surprise event, someone might say, “Don’t forget to let me in on the plans.”
  • If someone is discussing a new trend, they might ask, “Could you let me in on what’s popular right now?”

15. Decode it for me

This phrase is used when someone wants assistance in understanding or deciphering something that is difficult to comprehend.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to understand a complicated text, they might ask, “Can you decode it for me?”
  • In a conversation about a cryptic message, someone might say, “We need someone to decode it for us.”
  • If someone is confused about a scientific concept, they might ask, “Could you decode it for me so I can grasp the main idea?”

16. Unpack it

When someone says “unpack it,” they are asking for a thorough explanation or clarification of a concept or idea.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a complex theory, they might say, “Can you unpack it for me?”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might ask the teacher, “Can you unpack the instructions for this assignment?”
  • During a meeting, someone might request, “Please unpack the data and provide a summary of the findings.”

17. Make it clear

When someone says “make it clear,” they are asking for information or instructions to be presented in a way that is easily understood.

  • For instance, if someone is giving a presentation, they might say, “Let me make it clear: our main goal is to increase sales.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you make it clear what you need from me?”
  • When giving directions, a person might say, “Make it clear to everyone on the team what their responsibilities are.”

18. Show me the ropes

When someone says “show me the ropes,” they are asking to be taught the basic skills or knowledge needed to navigate a particular situation or task.

  • For example, if someone starts a new job, they might ask a more experienced colleague, “Can you show me the ropes around here?”
  • In a sports context, a new player might ask a teammate, “Can you show me the ropes of this game?”
  • When learning a new hobby, someone might request, “Can you show me the ropes of knitting?”

19. Break it down Barney style

When someone says “break it down Barney style,” they are asking for a clear and simple explanation of a complex concept or task, similar to how one would explain something to a child or a beginner.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to understand a difficult math problem, they might ask, “Can you break it down Barney style for me?”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s break down the project plan Barney style so everyone understands.”
  • When teaching a new skill, an instructor might say, “I’ll break it down Barney style so you can easily grasp the technique.”

20. Give me the rundown

When someone says “give me the rundown,” they are asking for a concise summary or overview of a situation, event, or topic.

  • For example, if someone missed a meeting, they might ask a colleague, “Can you give me the rundown of what happened?”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Give me the rundown of the game highlights.”
  • When discussing a movie, someone might ask, “Can you give me the rundown of the plot?”

21. Break it down like a fraction

This phrase is used to request a clear and concise explanation of a concept or situation. It implies breaking down complex information into smaller, more understandable parts.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to understand a math problem, they might say, “Can you break it down like a fraction?”
  • In a discussion about a complicated topic, someone might ask, “Can you break down the details in a way that’s easier to understand?”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Let me break down the steps of this equation for you.”

22. Break it down like a kit-kat

This phrase is used to request a detailed explanation or instructions. It suggests breaking down a process or concept into smaller, more manageable steps, similar to how a Kit-Kat chocolate bar can be broken apart.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to follow a set of instructions, they might ask, “Can you break it down like a Kit-Kat?”
  • In a cooking recipe, someone might say, “Break down the steps for me, starting with the preparation.”
  • A teacher might use this phrase to explain a complex concept to their students, saying, “Let’s break it down like a Kit-Kat so everyone can understand.”

23. Give me the deets

This slang phrase is used to ask for specific information or details about something. It is a shortened form of the word “details.”

  • For example, if someone is discussing a party, they might say, “Give me the deets on the location and time.”
  • In a conversation about a news article, someone might ask, “Can you give me the deets on what happened?”
  • A friend might ask another friend, “So, what are the deets on your new job?”

24. Put it in plain English

This phrase is used to request an explanation that is easy to understand, without the use of complex or technical language. It implies the need for clear and straightforward communication.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to comprehend a complicated concept, they might say, “Can you put it in plain English?”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask a presenter, “Can you put this information in plain English for those who may not be familiar with the topic?”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “I want you to understand this, so let’s put it in plain English.”

25. Give me the skinny

This slang phrase is used to ask for the latest or most important information about something. It implies a desire for up-to-date and relevant details.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a celebrity gossip, they might say, “Give me the skinny on their breakup.”
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might ask, “What’s the skinny on its features and performance?”
  • A friend might ask another friend, “So, what’s the skinny on the party? Any interesting news or updates?”

26. Explain it to me like I’m five

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain a concept or idea in a simple and easy-to-understand way, as if explaining it to a five-year-old child.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to understand a complex scientific concept, they might say, “Can you explain it to me like I’m five?”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might use this phrase to help students grasp a difficult topic by breaking it down into simpler terms.
  • A person might say, “I don’t understand this technical jargon. Can you explain it to me like I’m five?”

27. Make it crystal clear

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for a clear and easily understandable explanation or instruction.

  • For instance, if someone is giving directions and wants to ensure they are understood, they might say, “Let me make it crystal clear: turn left at the big red building.”
  • In a business meeting, a manager might say, “We need to make it crystal clear to the team what our expectations are.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “I want to make it crystal clear that cheating will not be tolerated.”

28. Give me the DL

DL is an abbreviation for “down low,” which means to keep something secret or confidential. In this context, it is used to ask for all the important information or details about a particular topic.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a juicy gossip, they might say, “Give me the DL on what happened at the party last night.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you give me the DL on the new project we’re working on?”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “I missed class yesterday. Can you give me the DL on what the professor covered?”

29. Break it down into bite-sized pieces

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain a complex topic or task by breaking it down into smaller and more manageable parts.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to understand a difficult math problem, they might say, “Can you break it down into bite-sized pieces for me?”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might say, “Let’s break down this recipe into bite-sized pieces so everyone can follow along.”
  • A manager might ask their team, “Can we break down this project into bite-sized pieces to make it more manageable?”

30. Give me the lowdown

This phrase is used to ask for a concise and informative summary of a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is curious about the latest gossip, they might say, “Give me the lowdown on what’s been happening.”
  • In a job interview, an employer might ask a candidate, “Can you give me the lowdown on your previous work experience?”
  • A friend might ask another friend, “I heard you went on vacation. Give me the lowdown on where you went and what you did.”

31. Tell me the deal

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide the necessary information or details about a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is unsure about a plan, they might say, “Tell me the deal so I can decide whether to join.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might ask, “Can you tell me the deal with this new project?”
  • A friend might inquire, “Tell me the deal with your new relationship. How did you two meet?”

32. Give me the inside scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to share insider or exclusive information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is curious about a celebrity’s personal life, they might say, “Give me the inside scoop on their recent breakup.”
  • In a workplace setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you give me the inside scoop on the upcoming company reorganization?”
  • A friend might say, “You work in the fashion industry. Give me the inside scoop on the latest trends.”

33. Give me the full story

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a complete and comprehensive account or explanation of a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is only aware of a partial story, they might say, “Give me the full story so I can understand the context.”
  • In a news interview, a journalist might ask, “Can you give me the full story behind this scandal?”
  • A friend might inquire, “I heard there was a conflict. Give me the full story so I can offer advice.”

34. Make it easy to understand

This phrase is used to request someone to simplify or clarify an explanation or concept to make it easier to understand.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to grasp a complex topic, they might say, “Can you make it easy to understand?”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might ask a teacher, “Can you make it easy to understand this math problem?”
  • A colleague might say, “I’m having trouble following your presentation. Can you make it easy to understand?”

35. Give me the full picture

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a comprehensive understanding or overview of a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is only aware of certain aspects of a situation, they might say, “Give me the full picture so I can make an informed decision.”
  • In a business meeting, a participant might request, “Can you give me the full picture of the current market trends?”
  • A friend might inquire, “I’ve only heard bits and pieces. Give me the full picture of what happened.”

36. Explain it in plain terms

This means to explain something in a way that is easy to understand, using simple words and avoiding complex jargon.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to understand a concept, you might say, “Let me explain it in plain terms for you.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated topic, someone might ask, “Can you explain it in plain terms so that everyone can understand?”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “I want you to explain your answer in plain terms, without using any technical terms.”

37. Give me the whole enchilada

This phrase means to provide or explain everything about a particular topic or situation, leaving nothing out.

  • For instance, if someone is asking for a summary of a book, you might say, “Do you want the whole enchilada or just a brief overview?”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might say, “I need all the details. Give me the whole enchilada.”
  • A manager might ask their employee, “Can you give me the whole enchilada on what happened during the meeting?”

38. Make it simple for me

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain or present something in a way that is easy to understand or comprehend.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to grasp a concept, they might say, “Can you make it simple for me?”
  • In a discussion about a complicated process, someone might ask, “Can you make it simple for me to understand how it works?”
  • A student might ask their teacher, “Can you make the instructions simple for me to follow?”

39. Break it down into simple terms

This means to explain something using simple and easy-to-understand words or concepts, removing any complexities or technical jargon.

  • For instance, if someone is having trouble understanding a complex idea, you might say, “Let me break it down into simple terms for you.”
  • In a conversation about a scientific concept, someone might ask, “Can you break it down into simple terms so that everyone can understand?”
  • A presenter might say to their audience, “I will break down the topic into simple terms to make it more accessible.”

40. Explain it like I’m a toddler

This phrase is used to request an explanation that is extremely simple and easy to understand, as if explaining something to a young child.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to comprehend a complex idea, they might say, “Can you explain it like I’m a toddler?”
  • In a discussion about a technical subject, someone might ask, “Can you explain it like I’m a toddler so that I can understand?”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “I want you to explain your answer as if you’re explaining it to a toddler.”

41. Tell me like it is

This phrase is used when someone wants to hear the unfiltered and direct truth about a situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What did you really think of my performance?” you could respond with, “Alright, I’ll tell you like it is.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult decision, someone might say, “I need you to tell me like it is, even if it’s not what I want to hear.”
  • When seeking feedback on a project, you might say, “Don’t sugarcoat it, just tell me like it is.”

42. Let me in on the secret

This expression is used when someone wants to be included in a secret or private information that others are aware of.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is whispering and you want to know what they’re talking about, you could say, “Hey, let me in on the secret!”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, you might ask, “Can you let me in on the secret details?”
  • When discussing a hidden feature of a new gadget, someone might say, “I’ll let you in on the secret: it has a built-in camera.”

43. Spill the tea

This phrase is used when someone wants to hear the latest gossip or inside information about a situation or person.

  • For example, if two friends are catching up and one wants to know what’s been happening, they might say, “Alright, spill the tea!”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might ask, “Do you have any tea to spill?”
  • When discussing a workplace rumor, a coworker might say, “Come on, spill the tea. What’s really going on?”

44. Let me in on the scoop

This expression is used when someone wants to be informed about the latest updates or news regarding a topic or event.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is discussing a recent development and you want to be included, you could say, “Hey, let me in on the scoop!”
  • In a conversation about a new movie release, you might ask, “Can you let me in on the scoop? Is it worth watching?”
  • When discussing a current event, someone might say, “I’ll let you in on the scoop: there’s going to be a protest downtown tomorrow.”

45. Give me the inside track

This phrase is used when someone wants to have access to insider knowledge or exclusive information that can give them an advantage.

  • For example, if someone is trying to win a competition and wants an edge, they might ask, “Can you give me the inside track?”
  • In a conversation about job hunting, someone might say, “Knowing someone in the industry can give you the inside track.”
  • When discussing a sports event, a fan might ask, “Do you have any tips? I want the inside track on this game.”

46. Put me in the picture

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or context about a situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a complex issue, they might say, “Can you put me in the picture? I’m not sure I understand.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you put me in the picture about the new project?”
  • A friend might ask, “Put me in the picture about your trip. I want to hear all about it.”

47. Break it down to brass tacks

This expression means to discuss or explain something in a straightforward and concise manner, without any unnecessary details.

  • For instance, if someone is giving a long-winded explanation, you might say, “Okay, let’s break it down to brass tacks. What’s the main issue here?”
  • During a meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s break it down to brass tacks so we can make a decision quickly.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “I need you to break it down to brass tacks in your essay. Get to the main points.”

48. Decode

To decode something means to analyze and interpret its meaning, especially when it’s not immediately clear or understandable.

  • For example, if someone sends you a cryptic message, you might say, “I need to decode this. What could it mean?”
  • In a puzzle-solving context, someone might say, “I love trying to decode riddles and brain teasers.”
  • A computer programmer might talk about decoding complex algorithms to achieve a desired outcome.
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49. Elaborate

When someone asks you to elaborate, they are requesting additional information or a more thorough explanation.

  • For instance, if you make a vague statement, someone might say, “Can you elaborate? I’m not sure what you mean.”
  • During a presentation, a listener might ask, “Can you elaborate on that point? I’d like to understand it better.”
  • A journalist might request an interviewee to elaborate on a certain topic to gather more information.

50. Clarify

To clarify means to make something more easily understood or to remove any confusion or ambiguity.

  • For example, if someone doesn’t understand your instructions, you might say, “Let me clarify. Here’s what you need to do.”
  • During a debate, a participant might ask, “Can you clarify your position? I’m not entirely clear on what you’re saying.”
  • A teacher might clarify a complex concept by providing real-life examples or simplifying the language used.

51. Interpret

To explain or understand the meaning or significance of something. “Interpret” is often used when analyzing or deciphering complex information or art.

  • For example, a critic might interpret a painting and say, “The use of vibrant colors and swirling brushstrokes suggests a sense of energy and movement.”
  • In a literary discussion, someone might interpret a poem and say, “I believe the poet is using the metaphor of a storm to symbolize inner turmoil.”
  • A teacher might ask students to interpret a difficult passage of a book and say, “What do you think the author is trying to convey with this metaphor?”

52. Expound

To explain or discuss something in great detail. “Expound” is often used when elaborating on a topic or providing a thorough analysis.

  • For instance, a professor might expound on a theory and say, “Let me expound on the implications of this concept.”
  • In a debate, someone might expound on their argument and say, “I’d like to expound on why I believe this policy is necessary.”
  • A writer might expound on a theme in their novel and say, “Throughout the story, I wanted to expound on the idea of redemption.”

53. Untangle

To clarify or resolve a confusing or complicated situation. “Untangle” is often used when trying to make sense of a complex problem or untangling a web of information.

  • For example, a detective might untangle a mystery and say, “After hours of investigation, I was finally able to untangle the clues.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated issue, someone might untangle the facts and say, “Let’s untangle the different aspects of this problem.”
  • A journalist might untangle a complicated story and say, “In this article, we will untangle the web of corruption and expose the truth.”

54. Demystify

To make something easier to understand or less mysterious. “Demystify” is often used when explaining a concept or process that may seem confusing or complicated.

  • For instance, a teacher might demystify a difficult math concept and say, “Let me demystify this equation for you.”
  • In a discussion about a complex technology, someone might demystify the workings and say, “I’m here to demystify how this device actually works.”
  • A writer might demystify a cultural practice in their article and say, “Through interviews and research, I hope to demystify this ancient tradition.”

55. Shed light on

To provide information or clarity that helps to better understand a subject. “Shed light on” is often used when revealing new insights or offering a different perspective.

  • For example, a scientist might shed light on a new discovery and say, “Our research has shed light on the mechanisms behind this phenomenon.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might shed light on a lesser-known aspect and say, “I’d like to shed light on the contributions of marginalized groups during this time.”
  • A journalist might shed light on a controversial issue and say, “Through extensive interviews, we aim to shed light on the truth behind these allegations.”

56. Get to the bottom of

To delve into a situation or problem in order to fully understand or uncover the truth.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to get to the bottom of this murder case.”
  • A journalist might write, “In this article, we will get to the bottom of the controversy surrounding the politician.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Let’s get to the bottom of why some students are struggling with this concept.”

57. Unravel

To solve or understand a complex or mysterious situation or problem.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “I need to unravel the clues to solve this crime.”
  • A person trying to solve a puzzle might say, “I’m determined to unravel this mystery.”
  • A scientist might say, “Through years of research, we were able to unravel the secrets of the universe.”

58. Delineate

To describe or explain something in a clear and detailed manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me delineate the steps for solving this math problem.”
  • A presenter might say, “In this presentation, I will delineate the key points of our research.”
  • A writer might write, “The author beautifully delineates the emotions of the main character in this novel.”

59. Specify

To state or define something in a precise or explicit manner.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “Please specify exactly what tasks need to be completed.”
  • A customer might say, “I need to specify the exact color and size of the product I want to order.”
  • A chef might say, “The recipe doesn’t just say ‘add spices,’ it specifies exactly which spices to use.”

60. Break down the details

To examine or explain the specific aspects or components of something in a detailed manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s break down the details of this historical event.”
  • A coach might say, “In order to improve, we need to break down the details of your performance.”
  • A researcher might write, “This study breaks down the details of the experiment methodology and results.”

61. Simplify

To make something easier to understand or less complicated. When you simplify something, you remove unnecessary details or simplify complex concepts.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me simplify this math problem for you.”
  • When explaining a difficult concept, someone might say, “Let me simplify it by using an analogy.”
  • A writer might simplify their language to make their article more accessible to a wider audience.
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62. Decipher

To figure out or interpret the meaning of something that is difficult to understand or written in code. Deciphering involves analyzing and understanding the hidden or complex message.

  • For instance, a cryptographer might decipher a coded message.
  • When reading a complex text, someone might say, “It took me a while to decipher the author’s meaning.”
  • A person might try to decipher the meaning of a dream or a work of art.

63. Make sense of

To comprehend or find meaning in something that is confusing or unclear. Making sense of something involves analyzing and connecting the different pieces of information to form a coherent understanding.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’m trying to make sense of this math problem.”
  • When faced with a complex situation, someone might ask, “Can you help me make sense of what’s going on?”
  • A person might struggle to make sense of their emotions or a difficult decision.

64. Enlighten

To provide knowledge or understanding to someone, often by sharing information or insights. When you enlighten someone, you help them see or understand something in a new or clearer way.

  • For instance, a teacher might enlighten their students about a historical event.
  • When discussing a complex topic, someone might say, “I was enlightened by the speaker’s presentation.”
  • A person might seek enlightenment through reading books or engaging in deep conversations.

65. Illustrate

To provide examples or visual representations to clarify or explain a concept or idea. Illustrating involves using visuals or specific instances to make something more understandable.

  • For example, a presenter might illustrate their point with a graph or chart.
  • When explaining a process, someone might say, “Let me illustrate it with a real-life scenario.”
  • A teacher might illustrate a difficult concept by using props or visual aids.
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66. Rationalize

To rationalize is to justify or explain one’s actions or beliefs in a way that makes them seem reasonable or acceptable, often without considering the true motives or consequences.

  • For example, someone might rationalize their decision to eat a second slice of cake by saying, “I had a long day and I deserve a treat.”
  • In a discussion about cheating on a test, a student might say, “I rationalized it by thinking that everyone else was doing it.”
  • A person might admit, “I know I shouldn’t buy another pair of shoes, but I’ll just rationalize it by saying they were on sale.”

67. Justify

To justify is to provide a reason or explanation for one’s actions, beliefs, or decisions, often with the intention of proving them to be right or valid.

  • For instance, someone might justify their decision to stay up late by saying, “I need to finish this project.”
  • In a debate about a controversial topic, a person might argue, “I can justify my position with data and research.”
  • A student might explain, “I justified skipping class by saying I needed a mental health day.”