Top 47 Slang For Depressed – Meaning & Usage

Feeling down and blue? Looking for a way to express your emotions in a relatable and modern way? Well, we’ve got you covered. Our team at Fluentslang has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a list of the top slang words for feeling depressed. Get ready to dive into this listicle and discover new words that perfectly capture the rollercoaster of emotions that come with being down in the dumps. Let’s explore together and find the words that resonate with you.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Blue

When someone says they’re feeling “blue,” they mean they are feeling sad or down. The term is often used to describe a general feeling of melancholy or unhappiness.
-For example, “I’ve been feeling really blue lately.”
-A person might say, “I woke up this morning feeling blue for no reason.”
-In a conversation about emotions, someone might ask, “Have you ever felt blue for no apparent reason?”

2. Down in the dumps

When someone is “down in the dumps,” they are feeling extremely sad or depressed. The phrase implies a deep sense of sadness or despair.
-For instance, “She’s been down in the dumps since her breakup.”
-A person might say, “I’ve had a rough week and I’m feeling really down in the dumps.”
-In a discussion about mental health, someone might mention, “Feeling down in the dumps can be a sign of depression.”

3. Feeling blue

When someone says they’re “feeling blue,” they mean they are experiencing sadness or melancholy. The phrase is often used to describe a temporary state of feeling down.
-For example, “I’m feeling blue today, but hopefully tomorrow will be better.”
-A person might say, “I’ve been feeling blue ever since I lost my job.”
-In a conversation about emotions, someone might ask, “What do you do when you’re feeling blue?”

4. In a funk

When someone is “in a funk,” they are feeling down or in a bad mood. The phrase suggests a temporary state of feeling low or unmotivated.
-For instance, “I’ve been in a funk all week and can’t seem to shake it.”
-A person might say, “I’m in a funk today, so I’m just going to stay home and relax.”
-In a discussion about mental wellbeing, someone might mention, “Getting stuck in a funk can be a sign of emotional exhaustion.”

5. Feeling down

When someone says they’re “feeling down,” they mean they are experiencing sadness or unhappiness. The phrase is often used to describe a temporary state of feeling low.
-For example, “I’ve been feeling down lately, but I’m trying to stay positive.”
-A person might say, “I’m feeling down today, so I’m going to take some time for self-care.”
-In a conversation about emotions, someone might ask, “What do you do when you’re feeling down?”

6. In the dumps

When someone is “in the dumps,” they are feeling extremely sad or down. It is a colloquial way of expressing deep sadness or depression.

  • For example, “Ever since she lost her job, she’s been in the dumps.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been in the dumps lately, I just can’t seem to shake this feeling of sadness.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s got you in the dumps? Is there anything I can do to help?”

7. Feeling low

When someone is “feeling low,” they are experiencing a state of sadness or unhappiness. It is a simple way of expressing a downcast mood.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling low ever since the breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really low today, I just can’t seem to find any motivation.”
  • Another might express, “Feeling low is tough, but I’m trying to stay positive and take care of myself.”

8. In the gutter

When someone is “in the gutter,” they are feeling extremely depressed or despairing. It is a figurative expression that conveys a sense of being at the lowest point emotionally.

  • For example, “After losing everything, he was really in the gutter.”
  • A person might say, “I hit rock bottom and ended up in the gutter.”
  • Another might express, “Being in the gutter feels like there’s no way out, but I’m trying to find hope.”

9. In the doldrums

When someone is “in the doldrums,” they are feeling dull, listless, or lacking energy. It is a metaphorical expression often used to describe a state of low mood or depression.

  • For instance, “Ever since the accident, she’s been in the doldrums.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been stuck in the doldrums lately, I just can’t seem to shake this feeling of emptiness.”
  • Another might ask, “How do you get out of the doldrums? I feel like I’m stuck.”

10. Feeling under the weather

When someone is “feeling under the weather,” they are either feeling physically unwell or experiencing a low mood. It is a common euphemism used to express not feeling one’s best.

  • For example, “I’m feeling a bit under the weather today, I think I might be coming down with a cold.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling under the weather lately, I just don’t have any energy.”
  • Another might express, “Feeling under the weather can really affect your mood, but I’m trying to take care of myself.”

11. Feeling despondent

When someone feels despondent, they experience a deep sense of hopelessness or discouragement. It is often associated with a lack of motivation or interest in life.

  • For example, “After failing the exam, she felt despondent and didn’t want to study anymore.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling despondent lately, like nothing is going right in my life.”
  • Someone might describe their mood as, “I woke up this morning feeling despondent for no reason.”

12. In a black mood

When someone is in a black mood, they are in a state of extreme sadness or depression. It is often characterized by a feeling of heaviness or darkness.

  • For instance, “She’s been in a black mood ever since her dog passed away.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t shake this black mood I’ve been in for the past few days.”
  • Someone might describe their feelings as, “I feel like I’m drowning in a black mood.”

13. Feeling melancholy

When someone feels melancholy, they experience a profound sadness or sorrow. It is often associated with a reflective or nostalgic mood.

  • For example, “As the sun set, he couldn’t help but feel melancholy about the passing of time.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling melancholy lately, thinking about the good old days.”
  • Someone might describe their mood as, “There’s a certain beauty in feeling melancholy sometimes.”

14. In the depths of despair

When someone is in the depths of despair, they are in a state of complete hopelessness or desperation. It is often characterized by a feeling of utter darkness or emptiness.

  • For instance, “She felt like she was in the depths of despair after losing her job.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been in the depths of despair ever since my relationship ended.”
  • Someone might describe their feelings as, “I can’t see a way out of this darkness, I’m in the depths of despair.”

15. Feeling dejected

When someone feels dejected, they experience a sense of being disheartened or discouraged. It is often associated with a feeling of rejection or disappointment.

  • For example, “After being rejected from her dream college, she felt dejected and lost.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling dejected lately, like nothing is going my way.”
  • Someone might describe their mood as, “I can’t shake this feeling of being dejected, no matter what I do.”

16. In a blue mood

When someone is in a blue mood, they are feeling down or sad. It can refer to a temporary state of sadness or a longer-lasting feeling of depression.

  • For example, “I’ve been in a blue mood all day, I can’t seem to shake it.”
  • A person might say, “She’s been in a blue mood ever since her dog passed away.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you okay? You seem to be in a blue mood lately.”

17. Feeling down and out

When someone is feeling down and out, they are feeling hopeless or defeated. It can describe a state of emotional low where someone feels like they have no energy or motivation.

  • For instance, “I lost my job and now I’m feeling really down and out.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling down and out ever since my relationship ended.”
  • Someone might ask, “How can I lift myself up when I’m feeling so down and out?”

18. Feeling gloomy

When someone is feeling gloomy, they are feeling sad or despondent. It can describe a state of low mood or a general feeling of sadness.

  • For example, “The rainy weather is making me feel really gloomy.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling gloomy ever since I received some bad news.”
  • Someone might ask, “How do you deal with feeling gloomy when it seems to last for days?”

19. Feeling empty

When someone is feeling empty, they are feeling devoid of emotions or purpose. It can describe a sense of inner emptiness or a lack of fulfillment.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling so empty lately, like nothing brings me joy.”
  • A person might say, “I feel empty inside after the loss of a loved one.”
  • Someone might ask, “How can I fill this void and stop feeling so empty?”

20. In a pit of despair

When someone is in a pit of despair, they are feeling deeply hopeless or despondent. It can describe a state of extreme sadness or depression.

  • For example, “After the breakup, I felt like I was in a pit of despair.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t seem to escape this pit of despair I’m in.”
  • Someone might ask, “How do you climb out of a pit of despair when everything feels so overwhelming?”

21. Low

When someone is feeling low, they are experiencing a state of sadness or unhappiness. It can refer to a temporary mood or a prolonged feeling of depression.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling really low lately, I just can’t seem to shake off this sadness.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling low today, so I’m going to take some time for self-care.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, someone might ask, “Have you ever felt really low for no apparent reason?”

22. Bummed out

To be bummed out means to feel disappointed, let down, or disheartened. It is often used to describe a temporary feeling of sadness or frustration.

  • For instance, “I’m really bummed out that I didn’t get the job I interviewed for.”
  • A person might say, “I was really looking forward to the concert, but it got canceled. I’m so bummed out.”
  • In a conversation about plans falling through, someone might say, “I had plans to go hiking this weekend, but the weather forecast is bumming me out.”

23. Gloomy

Gloomy refers to a state of sadness, despondency, or a generally pessimistic outlook. It can describe both a temporary mood and a more prolonged feeling of depression.

  • For example, “The rainy weather is making me feel gloomy.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling really gloomy lately, I just can’t seem to find joy in anything.”
  • In a conversation about emotional states, someone might ask, “Do you ever feel gloomy for no apparent reason?”

24. Melancholy

Melancholy is a state of deep, long-lasting sadness or sorrow. It often carries a sense of nostalgia or longing. It can also refer to a specific type of music or art that evokes a feeling of sadness.

  • For instance, “Listening to sad songs always puts me in a melancholy mood.”
  • A person might say, “I feel a sense of melancholy whenever I visit my childhood home.”
  • In a conversation about emotional experiences, someone might ask, “Have you ever felt a deep sense of melancholy that you couldn’t shake off?”

25. Moody

When someone is moody, it means their emotions and moods are unpredictable or fluctuating. They may experience frequent changes in their feelings, ranging from happiness to sadness and everything in between.

  • For example, “She’s been really moody lately, you never know how she’s going to react.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling moody today, so it’s best to give me some space.”
  • In a conversation about emotional stability, someone might ask, “Do you ever find yourself being moody for no apparent reason?”

26. Sads

This term is used to describe a general feeling of sadness or unhappiness.

  • For example, “I’ve been dealing with the sads lately and just can’t seem to shake it.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not sure why, but I’ve got a case of the sads today.”
  • Someone might describe their mood by saying, “I woke up with the sads and it’s been a tough day.”

27. Despondent

Despondent refers to a state of extreme low spirits or feeling hopeless.

  • For instance, “After receiving the bad news, she became despondent and withdrew from social activities.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling despondent about the future and don’t know how to find hope.”
  • Someone might describe their emotions by saying, “The constant setbacks have left me feeling despondent and defeated.”

28. Dejected

Dejected describes a feeling of sadness, disappointment, or discouragement.

  • For example, “After failing the exam, he walked out of the classroom with a dejected expression.”
  • A person might say, “I received another rejection letter and I’m feeling dejected.”
  • Someone might describe their state of mind by saying, “The constant criticism has left me feeling dejected and unmotivated.”

29. Morose

Morose refers to a gloomy, sullen, or ill-tempered state of mind.

  • For instance, “He sat alone in the corner, wearing a morose expression on his face.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t seem to shake off this morose feeling.”
  • Someone might describe their mood by saying, “The rainy weather has put me in a morose state.”

30. Blue funk

Blue funk is a term used to describe a state of deep sadness or depression.

  • For example, “Ever since the breakup, she’s been in a blue funk.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been in a blue funk lately and can’t seem to find any joy.”
  • Someone might describe their emotional state by saying, “The loss of a loved one has put me in a blue funk.”

31. Downtrodden

This word describes someone who feels defeated or beaten down, often due to difficult circumstances or mistreatment.

  • For example, “After losing his job and going through a divorce, he felt downtrodden and hopeless.”
  • In a discussion about social inequality, someone might say, “The downtrodden in our society are often overlooked and ignored.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as “a downtrodden soul,“a downtrodden soul, burdened by a lifetime of hardships.”

32. Woebegone

This word describes someone who appears extremely sad or sorrowful, often due to a specific event or ongoing situation.

  • For instance, “She looked woebegone after receiving the news of her loved one’s passing.”
  • In a conversation about heartbreak, someone might say, “I’ve never seen him so woebegone since his breakup.”
  • A poet might use the word to describe a desolate landscape, writing, “The barren fields lay woebegone under the gray sky.”

33. Crestfallen

This word describes someone who feels deeply disappointed, discouraged, or defeated, often due to a failed expectation or setback.

  • For example, “He was crestfallen when he didn’t get the job he had been hoping for.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The team was crestfallen after losing the championship game.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s expression as “a crestfallen look,“a crestfallen look, as if all hope had been drained from their eyes.”

34. Dispirited

This word describes someone who feels dejected, lacking in spirit, or lacking motivation, often due to a loss or a series of disappointments.

  • For instance, “She was dispirited after her manuscript was rejected by multiple publishers.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult journey, someone might say, “The hiker grew dispirited as the trail became steeper and more treacherous.”
  • A motivational speaker might address a dispirited audience, saying, “Don’t let setbacks and failures make you dispirited. Keep pushing forward.”

35. Forlorn

This word describes someone who feels abandoned, lonely, or without hope, often due to a sense of isolation or loss.

  • For example, “He wandered through the empty streets, feeling forlorn and forgotten.”
  • In a discussion about neglected neighborhoods, someone might say, “The houses stood forlorn, their windows boarded up and their gardens overgrown.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s voice as “filled with forlorn longing,“filled with forlorn longing, as if searching for something lost in the past.”

36. Heartbroken

Feeling extreme sadness and emotional pain due to a broken heart or loss in a romantic relationship.

  • For example, “After her long-term boyfriend broke up with her, she was heartbroken.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he cheated on me. I’m absolutely heartbroken.”
  • Another might express their feelings by saying, “Every time I see them together, it just reminds me of how heartbroken I am.”

37. Feeling down in the mouth

Feeling low or unhappy, often due to a specific situation or circumstance.

  • For instance, “Ever since she lost her job, she’s been feeling down in the mouth.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling down in the mouth lately because of all the stress at work.”
  • Another might express their emotions by saying, “I’m feeling down in the mouth because I failed my exam.”

38. Feeling out of sorts

Feeling physically or emotionally unwell, experiencing a sense of discomfort or unease.

  • For example, “I didn’t sleep well last night, so I’m feeling out of sorts today.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t seem to shake this feeling of being out of sorts.”
  • Another might express their emotions by saying, “I’m feeling out of sorts because of all the stress from work.”

39. Feeling in the dumps

Feeling emotionally low or depressed, experiencing a sense of sadness or gloom.

  • For instance, “Ever since she lost her pet, she’s been feeling in the dumps.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling in the dumps because I didn’t get the promotion I was hoping for.”
  • Another might express their emotions by saying, “I’ve been feeling in the dumps lately because of all the bad news.”

40. Feeling bummed out

Feeling unhappy, disappointed, or discouraged about a particular situation or outcome.

  • For example, “I was really looking forward to the concert, but it got canceled. Now I’m feeling bummed out.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling bummed out because I didn’t get the job I interviewed for.”
  • Another might express their emotions by saying, “I’ve been feeling bummed out lately because I haven’t been able to see my friends.”

41. Feeling in a slump

When someone is in a slump, they are feeling down or unmotivated. It can refer to a temporary period of low mood or a longer-lasting state of depression.

  • For example, “I’ve been in a slump lately and can’t seem to find the motivation to do anything.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m feeling in a slump today, so I’m just going to take it easy.”
  • A person might describe their ongoing struggles with depression by saying, “I’ve been in a slump for months and can’t seem to shake it off.”

42. Feeling in the blues

When someone is feeling in the blues, they are feeling sad or melancholic. It refers to a state of emotional distress or unhappiness.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling in the blues since my breakup.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling in the blues today, so I just want to stay home and listen to sad music.”
  • Someone might express their feelings by saying, “I can’t shake off this feeling in the blues no matter what I do.”

43. Feeling in a rut

When someone is feeling in a rut, they are feeling stuck or trapped in a repetitive or unfulfilling routine. It can also refer to a state of low motivation or inspiration.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling in a rut at work, doing the same tasks every day.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling in a rut with my hobbies, I need something new to spark my interest.”
  • Someone might express their frustration by saying, “I feel like I’m in a rut with my life, nothing seems to be changing or improving.”

44. Feeling in the pits

When someone is feeling in the pits, they are feeling extremely down or depressed. It denotes a state of deep sadness or despair.

  • For instance, “I lost my job and now I’m feeling in the pits.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling in the pits today, everything feels hopeless.”
  • Someone might describe their emotional state by saying, “I’ve been feeling in the pits for weeks, it’s hard to find any joy or motivation.”

45. Feeling in a black hole

When someone is feeling in a black hole, they are feeling engulfed by darkness or emptiness. It describes a state of extreme sadness, despair, or hopelessness.

  • For example, “After the loss of a loved one, I felt like I was in a black hole.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling in a black hole today, it’s hard to see any light.”
  • Someone might express their emotional state by saying, “Depression can make you feel like you’re in a black hole, with no way out.”

46. Feeling in a dark place

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of being deeply depressed or overwhelmed with negative emotions. It implies a sense of being trapped or lost in a state of darkness.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling in a dark place lately, and it’s hard to see any light at the end of the tunnel.”
  • Someone might say, “When I’m feeling in a dark place, it’s difficult to find motivation or joy in anything.”
  • A person might express, “I can’t explain it, but sometimes I just wake up feeling in a dark place, and it’s hard to shake off.”

47. Feeling in despair

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme despair or desolation. It conveys a sense of complete hopelessness and a lack of belief in any positive outcome.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling in despair lately, and it’s hard to find any reason to keep going.”
  • Someone might say, “When I’m feeling in despair, it feels like there’s no point in trying anymore.”
  • A person might express, “I can’t shake this feeling of despair, and it’s starting to affect every aspect of my life.”
See also  Top 40 Slang For Productivity – Meaning & Usage