Top 30 Slang For Detail – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to adding that extra touch of flair to your conversations, having the right slang for detail can make all the difference. Whether you’re looking to spice up your texts or impress your friends with your knowledge of the latest trends, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we uncover the most popular and trendy slang terms that will take your communication skills to the next level. Get ready to level up your linguistic game and stay ahead of the curve with our curated list of must-know slang for detail.

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1. Nitty-gritty

This term refers to the intricate or essential aspects of a situation or topic.

  • For example, “Let’s get down to the nitty-gritty and discuss the specifics of our plan.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to know the nitty-gritty details before we can move forward.”
  • A manager might ask, “Have you considered all the nitty-gritty aspects of this proposal?”

2. Ins and outs

This phrase refers to the comprehensive understanding of a topic or the complete knowledge of how something works.

  • For instance, “I’ve been studying this subject for years, so I know all the ins and outs.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated process, someone might say, “Before you start, make sure you understand all the ins and outs.”
  • A teacher might explain, “I’ll guide you through the ins and outs of this math problem step by step.”

3. Lowdown

This term refers to the crucial or significant details about a situation or topic.

  • For example, “Give me the lowdown on what happened at the meeting.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might say, “I’ll give you the lowdown on its features and benefits.”
  • A journalist might ask, “Can you provide the lowdown on the scandal that’s been making headlines?”

4. Fine print

This term refers to the specific details or conditions that are often overlooked or not immediately apparent.

  • For instance, “Before signing the contract, make sure you read the fine print.”
  • In a conversation about a promotional offer, someone might say, “Be cautious of any hidden fees or restrictions in the fine print.”
  • A consumer might warn others, “Always read the fine print to avoid any surprises or misunderstandings.”

5. Brass tacks

This phrase refers to getting to the fundamental or practical aspects of a situation or topic.

  • For example, “Let’s cut to the brass tacks and discuss the main points of our presentation.”
  • In a conversation about budgeting, someone might say, “Let’s get down to brass tacks and analyze our expenses.”
  • A manager might ask, “Can you give me the brass tacks of this project? I need a concise summary.”

6. Rundown

A quick and concise explanation or summary of something. “Rundown” is often used to provide a brief overview or outline of a situation or topic.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Give me a rundown of the project’s progress.”
  • In a news article, the headline might read, “Here’s a rundown of the key points from the press conference.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me a rundown of what happened at the party last night?”

7. Skinny

“Skinny” refers to the essential or inside information about a particular situation or topic. It is often used to describe details or facts that are not widely known.

  • For instance, a gossip columnist might say, “I’ve got the skinny on the latest celebrity scandal.”
  • In a conversation about a new job opening, someone might ask, “Do you have any skinny on the company culture?”
  • A friend might share, “I’ll give you the skinny on the best restaurants in town.”

8. Dirt

“Dirt” is slang for secret or confidential information about someone or something. It is often used to refer to scandalous or compromising details.

  • For example, a tabloid headline might read, “New Book Reveals the Dirt on Hollywood’s A-List Celebrities.”
  • In a conversation about a political scandal, someone might say, “I’ve heard there’s some dirt on that politician.”
  • A friend might share, “I’ve got the dirt on why they broke up.”

9. Deets

A shortened form of the word “details,” “deets” is used to refer to specific or additional information about something.

  • For instance, a friend might ask, “Can you give me the deets on the party?”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I’ll text you the deets about the meeting.”
  • A person discussing travel plans might say, “Let’s meet up later and go over the deets.”

10. Specifics

“Specifics” refers to precise or detailed information about something. It is often used to request or provide specific details.

  • For example, a teacher might ask, “Can you provide some specifics about your research?”
  • In a job interview, the interviewer might ask, “Can you give me some specifics about your previous work experience?”
  • A friend might say, “I need to know the specifics of the plan before I can commit.”

11. Particulars

This term refers to specific or detailed information about something. It can be used to emphasize the importance of paying attention to the specifics or to request more specific information.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s go over the particulars of the project.”
  • In a conversation about a crime, a detective might ask, “Do you have any particulars about the suspect?”
  • A journalist might write, “The article provides all the particulars of the new legislation.”

12. Intel

This slang term is short for “intelligence” and is used to refer to information or knowledge about a particular subject. It is often used in informal or casual conversations.

  • For instance, a spy movie might feature a character saying, “I’ve got some intel on the enemy’s plans.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might ask, “Do you have any intel on its release date?”
  • A tech enthusiast might say, “I’ve gathered some intel on the latest smartphone features.”

13. Scoop

This term is used to describe exclusive or important information that is obtained before others. It can also refer to breaking news or a significant story.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I’ve got a scoop on a major political scandal.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity’s personal life, someone might ask, “Do you have any scoops on their upcoming projects?”
  • A gossip columnist might write, “Here’s the latest scoop on the Hollywood dating scene.”

14. Facts and figures

This phrase is used to refer to specific details and statistics about a particular subject. It emphasizes the importance of relying on concrete information rather than assumptions or generalizations.

  • For instance, a business presentation might include a slide with “Facts and Figures” to provide data and statistics.
  • In a discussion about a scientific study, someone might say, “Let’s look at the facts and figures to draw accurate conclusions.”
  • A teacher might ask students, “Can you provide any facts and figures to support your argument?”

15. Gist

This term refers to the essence or main point of something. It is often used when summarizing or providing a brief overview of a larger piece of information.

  • For example, a student might say, “I didn’t read the whole book, but I got the gist of it.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might ask, “Can you give me the gist of the plot without spoiling it?”
  • A presenter might say, “Let me give you the gist of my research findings before diving into the details.”

16. Breakdown

This term refers to a detailed explanation or analysis of something, often breaking it down into its individual components or steps.

  • For example, in a car repair manual, you might find a breakdown of the engine’s components and how they work together.
  • In a discussion about a movie plot, someone might provide a breakdown of the key events and character arcs.
  • A teacher might give a breakdown of a math problem, showing each step in the solution.
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17. Whole shebang

This phrase is used to refer to the entirety of something, including all the details or components.

  • For instance, when describing a project, someone might say, “We need to plan and execute the whole shebang.”
  • In a conversation about organizing a party, someone might say, “We have to take care of invitations, decorations, food—the whole shebang.”
  • When discussing a comprehensive report, someone might mention, “The report covers the whole shebang, from market research to financial analysis.”

18. Full Monty

This slang term refers to having or experiencing something in its entirety, including all the necessary or desired details.

  • For example, when talking about a vacation, someone might say, “We went for the full Monty, exploring all the tourist attractions.”
  • In a discussion about a meal, someone might say, “I ordered the full Monty—a three-course dinner with all the extras.”
  • When describing a comprehensive training program, someone might mention, “Our employees receive the full Monty, with modules covering all aspects of their job.”

19. Nuts and bolts

This phrase is used to refer to the basic or essential details or components of something.

  • For instance, when explaining how a machine works, someone might say, “Let me show you the nuts and bolts of it.”
  • In a discussion about a business plan, someone might mention, “We need to focus on the nuts and bolts—target market, competition, and financial projections.”
  • When describing a recipe, someone might say, “I’ll teach you the nuts and bolts of baking—a perfect base for any dessert.”

20. Fine points

This term refers to the small or subtle details or nuances of something, often related to a specific topic or skill.

  • For example, when discussing a painting, an art critic might point out the fine points of the brushwork or color palette.
  • In a conversation about negotiation tactics, someone might mention, “It’s important to understand the fine points of body language and tone of voice.”
  • When describing a dance routine, someone might say, “Pay attention to the fine points—the precise footwork and graceful arm movements.”

21. Ropes

In slang terms, “ropes” refers to having a good understanding or knowledge about something.

  • For example, “I’ve been studying for hours, I know the ropes of this subject.”
  • In a conversation about a new job, someone might say, “I’m still learning the ropes, but I’m getting there.”
  • A person discussing a difficult task might say, “Once you know the ropes, it becomes much easier.”

22. Dope

In slang, “dope” is used to describe something as cool, excellent, or impressive.

  • For instance, “That car is so dope!”
  • A person might say, “I just saw an amazing movie, it was dope.”
  • When describing a talented musician, someone might say, “They have some seriously dope skills.”

23. Guts

In slang, “guts” refers to courage or bravery in the face of danger or difficulty.

  • For example, “It takes guts to speak up against injustice.”
  • In a discussion about extreme sports, someone might say, “You have to have guts to try that.”
  • A person might compliment someone by saying, “You’ve got guts for taking on that challenge.”

24. 411

In slang, “411” is used to refer to information or details about a particular topic.

  • For instance, “Can you give me the 411 on what happened last night?”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might ask, “Do you have the 411 on their menu?”
  • A person might say, “I need the 411 before I can make a decision.”

25. Low-key

In slang, “low-key” is used to describe something that is subtle or not widely known.

  • For example, “I low-key love that song.”
  • A person might say, “I’m low-key excited for the weekend.”
  • When discussing a secret talent, someone might say, “I’m low-key really good at playing the piano.”

26. Down to the wire

This phrase is used to describe a situation that is very close to reaching a conclusion or deadline. It implies that there is little time left and the outcome is uncertain.

  • For example, “The game was down to the wire, with both teams tied in the final seconds.”
  • In a political race, someone might say, “The election is down to the wire, and every vote counts.”
  • A student might say, “I finished my essay down to the wire, just before the deadline.”

27. Play-by-play

This term is used to describe a detailed description or account of an event or situation, often given in real-time.

  • For instance, “The sports commentator provided a play-by-play of the game, describing each play as it happened.”
  • During a live performance, someone might say, “I’ll give you a play-by-play of the concert, so you don’t miss anything.”
  • A person describing a car accident might say, “I witnessed the whole thing and can give you a play-by-play of what happened.”

28. Inside Information

This phrase refers to information or knowledge that is not publicly known and is only known by a select few individuals.

  • For example, “He had inside information about the company’s upcoming merger.”
  • In a legal case, someone might say, “The lawyer has inside information that could change the outcome of the trial.”
  • A journalist might say, “I have some inside information about the upcoming election that will shock the public.”

29. Full Picture

This phrase is used to describe having a complete understanding or knowledge of a situation or topic.

  • For instance, “Before making a decision, it’s important to have the full picture of the situation.”
  • When discussing a complex issue, someone might say, “Let me explain the full picture so you can understand the context.”
  • A teacher might say, “I want my students to have the full picture of the historical event before we discuss its significance.”

30. Whole Nine Yards

This phrase is used to indicate the entirety of something or all the details associated with it.

  • For example, “He went all out for the party, decorating the whole nine yards.”
  • When describing a project, someone might say, “I’ll give you the whole nine yards, including the timeline, budget, and resources.”
  • A person talking about their vacation might say, “We did the whole nine yards, visiting all the tourist attractions and trying all the local cuisine.”