Top 82 Slang For Detrimental – Meaning & Usage

Detrimental situations can be tough to navigate, especially when it comes to expressing how they make us feel. But fear not, we’ve got you covered with a list of slang terms that perfectly encapsulate the negative impact of these experiences. Whether you’re looking to vent or simply expand your vocabulary, this compilation is sure to provide some insight into how we express the downside of life’s challenges. So buckle up and get ready to explore the world of slang for detrimental with us!

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1. Wack

Wack is a slang term used to describe something that is considered bad or disappointing. It can refer to a person, an object, or a situation.

  • For example, “That movie was wack, I expected it to be better.”
  • Someone might say, “This song is wack, I can’t stand the beat.”
  • A person might describe a party as wack if it is boring or poorly organized.

2. Trash

Trash is a slang term used to describe something that is of low quality or undesirable. It can be used to describe objects, people, or situations.

  • For instance, “That movie was trash, I wouldn’t recommend watching it.”
  • Someone might say, “This restaurant is trash, the food is terrible.”
  • A person might describe a job as trash if it is poorly paid and offers no benefits.

3. Lame

Lame is a slang term used to describe something that is uncool or boring. It can be used to describe people, activities, or situations.

  • For example, “That party was lame, there was nothing to do.”
  • Someone might say, “His jokes are lame, they’re not funny.”
  • A person might describe a concert as lame if the performer lacks energy or enthusiasm.

4. Whack

Whack is a slang term used to describe something that is crazy or nonsensical. It can be used to describe people, actions, or ideas.

  • For instance, “He’s acting whack, I don’t understand his behavior.”
  • Someone might say, “That idea is whack, it doesn’t make any sense.”
  • A person might describe a conspiracy theory as whack if it lacks evidence or logic.

5. Garbage

Garbage is a slang term used to describe something that is worthless or of poor quality. It can be used to describe objects, people, or situations.

  • For example, “This phone is garbage, it keeps freezing.”
  • Someone might say, “Her cooking is garbage, I’d rather eat out.”
  • A person might describe a book as garbage if it is poorly written and lacks substance.

6. Bogus

This term is used to describe something that is not genuine or true. It is often used to express disbelief or disappointment.

  • For example, “That website is full of bogus information.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t believe his story, it’s totally bogus.”
  • Another might comment, “I bought a bogus product online and it didn’t work at all.”

7. Janky

Janky is slang for something that is of low quality or in bad condition. It can refer to anything from objects to people or situations.

  • For instance, “That car looks janky, I wouldn’t trust it.”
  • A person might say, “The WiFi in this hotel is so janky, it keeps disconnecting.”
  • Another might comment, “The construction of this building is janky, it’s falling apart.”

8. Bunk

Bunk is a term used to describe something that is untrue, exaggerated, or nonsensical. It is often used to express disbelief or disappointment.

  • For example, “His excuse for being late is total bunk.”
  • A person might say, “I tried that diet and it’s complete bunk, it didn’t work at all.”
  • Another might comment, “The information in that article is bunk, it’s not based on any scientific evidence.”

9. Crappy

Crappy is a term used to describe something that is of low quality or not up to standard. It can refer to anything from objects to situations or experiences.

  • For instance, “I bought this shirt and it’s really crappy, the stitching is coming undone.”
  • A person might say, “The service at that restaurant was crappy, the waiters were rude and slow.”
  • Another might comment, “I had a crappy day at work, everything went wrong.”

10. Ratchet

Ratchet is slang used to describe someone or something that is considered low class, trashy, or vulgar. It is often used to criticize behavior or appearance.

  • For example, “She was acting so ratchet at the party, dancing on tables and causing a scene.”
  • A person might say, “Those clothes are ratchet, they look cheap and tacky.”
  • Another might comment, “The music at this club is so ratchet, it’s all explicit and offensive.”

11. Sketchy

This term is used to describe something or someone that seems untrustworthy or unreliable. It implies a sense of danger or risk.

  • For example, “That guy’s behavior is really sketchy. I don’t think we should trust him.”
  • When discussing a suspicious situation, someone might say, “I walked into a sketchy neighborhood and immediately felt unsafe.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Be careful, that website looks sketchy. It might be a scam.”

12. Shady

This slang term refers to someone or something that is untrustworthy or suspicious. It suggests a lack of integrity or moral character.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust that guy. He’s always involved in shady business deals.”
  • When describing a deceitful action, someone might say, “His behavior was really shady. He lied about everything.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Stay away from that company, they have a shady reputation.”

13. Lousy

This word is used to describe something that is extremely bad or unsatisfactory. It implies disappointment or dissatisfaction.

  • For example, “The service at that restaurant was lousy. The food was cold and the waitstaff was rude.”
  • When expressing dissatisfaction with a product, someone might say, “I bought this new phone and it turned out to be lousy. It keeps freezing and the battery dies quickly.”
  • A person might complain, “I had a lousy day at work. Everything went wrong.”

14. Subpar

This term is used to describe something that is of lower quality or performance compared to what is expected or desired. It suggests disappointment or mediocrity.

  • For instance, “The team’s performance was subpar. They made too many mistakes.”
  • When discussing a disappointing movie, someone might say, “The acting was subpar and the plot was predictable.”
  • A person might express their dissatisfaction, “I paid a lot of money for this meal, but the quality was subpar.”

15. Dubious

This word is used to describe something that is questionable or doubtful. It suggests a lack of trust or confidence.

  • For example, “The evidence presented in court was dubious. It didn’t prove the defendant’s guilt.”
  • When expressing skepticism, someone might say, “I find his explanation for being late very dubious. I think he’s lying.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Be cautious, that website seems dubious. It might be a scam.”

16. Dodgy

This term is used to describe something that is unreliable, dishonest, or of poor quality. It can refer to a person, object, or situation.

  • For example, “I bought a dodgy phone off the street and it stopped working after a week.”
  • In a conversation about a shady business deal, someone might say, “That sounds dodgy, I wouldn’t trust it.”
  • A person might describe a sketchy neighborhood as, “Avoid that area, it’s known for its dodgy characters.”

17. Shoddy

This word is used to describe something that is badly made, cheaply constructed, or of inferior quality.

  • For instance, “I bought a shoddy pair of shoes and they fell apart after a few wears.”
  • In a discussion about a poorly constructed building, someone might comment, “The construction company did a shoddy job on this house.”
  • A person might criticize a subpar product by saying, “The company should be ashamed of selling such shoddy merchandise.”

18. Flawed

This term is used to describe something that has mistakes, errors, or faults.

  • For example, “The study’s methodology was flawed, so the results may not be accurate.”
  • In a conversation about a flawed argument, someone might point out, “Your reasoning is flawed because you’re ignoring important evidence.”
  • A person might discuss a flawed system by saying, “The voting process is flawed and needs to be improved.”

19. Faulty

This word is used to describe something that is broken, malfunctioning, or not working as intended.

  • For instance, “I returned the faulty toaster to the store because it wouldn’t toast bread.”
  • In a discussion about a faulty car, someone might say, “The engine keeps stalling, it’s definitely faulty.”
  • A person might complain about a faulty product by saying, “I wasted my money on this faulty laptop that constantly freezes.”

20. Defective

This term is used to describe something that has a defect, flaw, or malfunction.

  • For example, “The defective light bulb kept flickering and wouldn’t stay on.”
  • In a conversation about a defective appliance, someone might comment, “The washing machine is leaking water, it must be defective.”
  • A person might request a refund for a defective product by saying, “I received a defective item that doesn’t work, I’d like a replacement or a refund.”

21. Inferior

This term refers to something that is of lower quality or less than satisfactory. It is often used to describe a product, performance, or individual that is considered to be below average or not up to par.

  • For example, “The team’s inferior defense cost them the game.”
  • In a discussion about smartphones, someone might say, “This model is clearly inferior to its competitors.”
  • A person critiquing a movie might comment, “The acting was subpar, making the film feel inferior to others in the genre.”

22. Unfavorable

This word is used to describe something that is not advantageous or beneficial. It implies a lack of support or preference for a particular outcome or situation.

  • For instance, “The weather forecast is unfavorable for our outdoor event.”
  • In a political discussion, someone might say, “The candidate’s unfavorable policies are causing concern among voters.”
  • A person reviewing a restaurant might comment, “The service was slow and the food was of unfavorable quality.”

23. Adverse

This term is used to describe something that has a negative or harmful effect. It implies a detrimental impact on a person, situation, or outcome.

  • For example, “The adverse weather conditions forced the event to be canceled.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might explain, “This medication can have adverse side effects.”
  • A person discussing the consequences of smoking might say, “The adverse health effects of smoking are well-documented.”

24. Detrimental

This word is used to describe something that causes harm or damage. It implies a negative impact on a person, group, or situation.

  • For instance, “Lack of exercise can be detrimental to one’s health.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “The company’s poor financial decisions had a detrimental effect on its success.”
  • A person discussing the effects of pollution might comment, “The detrimental impact of pollution on the environment is a growing concern.”

25. Bad news

This phrase is used to describe information or news that is undesirable, disappointing, or unfavorable. It implies a negative outcome or situation.

  • For example, “I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but the project deadline has been moved up.”
  • In a personal conversation, someone might say, “I have some bad news to share, I didn’t get the job.”
  • A person discussing a recent event might comment, “The bad news is, it rained during our outdoor wedding.”

26. Bummer

This term is used to describe a situation that is unfortunate or disappointing.

  • For example, “It’s a bummer that the concert got canceled.”
  • A person might say, “It’s such a bummer that I failed my test.”
  • In a conversation about plans falling through, someone might say, “Well, that’s a bummer.”

27. Drag

This slang term is used to describe something that is dull, boring, or uninteresting.

  • For instance, “Cleaning the house is such a drag.”
  • A person might say, “Going to that party would be a drag.”
  • In a discussion about work, someone might complain, “My job is such a drag.”

28. Downer

This term is used to describe something that negatively affects the mood or brings down the atmosphere.

  • For example, “The rainy weather is such a downer.”
  • A person might say, “Hearing bad news is always a downer.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing outcome, someone might say, “Well, that’s a downer.”

29. Wreck

This slang term is used to describe the act of damaging or destroying something.

  • For instance, “He totally wrecked his car in the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I accidentally wrecked my phone by dropping it.”
  • In a discussion about a disastrous event, someone might say, “The storm wrecked havoc on the town.”

30. Mess up

This term is used to describe the act of making a mistake or causing something to become disorganized or chaotic.

  • For example, “I really messed up my presentation at work.”
  • A person might say, “I messed up my relationship by not communicating.”
  • In a conversation about a failed attempt, someone might say, “I completely messed up the recipe.”

31. Screw up

This term refers to making a mistake or doing something incorrectly. It can also imply causing harm or damage to a situation.

  • For example, “I really screwed up that presentation at work.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t screw up your chances with that job opportunity.”
  • Someone might confess, “I screwed up my relationship by not communicating properly.”

32. Ruin

To ruin something means to completely destroy or make it unusable. It can also refer to causing significant harm or damage to a person or situation.

  • For instance, “The rain ruined our picnic.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t let one mistake ruin your entire day.”
  • Someone might regretfully admit, “I ruined my chances with them by saying the wrong thing.”

33. Spoil

To spoil something means to damage or ruin it, often by exposing it to unfavorable conditions or treating it improperly.

  • For example, “The milk spoiled because it was left out of the fridge.”
  • A parent might say, “Don’t spoil your dinner by eating too many snacks.”
  • A person might complain, “The ending of that movie was spoiled for me.”

34. Tank

To tank something means to fail or perform poorly, often in a significant or dramatic way.

  • For instance, “The team tanked the game and lost by a landslide.”
  • A student might say, “I’m going to tank this test if I don’t study.”
  • A person might admit, “I tanked the interview by showing up late.”

35. Crash

To crash something means to cause it to fail or collapse, often suddenly or unexpectedly.

  • For example, “The stock market crashed, causing widespread panic.”
  • A person might say, “I crashed my computer by downloading a virus.”
  • A driver might confess, “I crashed my car into a tree.”

36. Blow

In slang, “blow” is often used to describe a situation or event that is a complete disaster or failure. It can also refer to a significant setback or disappointment.

  • For example, “The party last night was a total blow. No one showed up.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “Losing that game was a blow to our team’s morale.”
  • A person discussing their failed business venture might say, “The whole thing was a blow to my finances and my ego.”

37. Bust

When used as slang, “bust” typically refers to a failure or unsuccessful attempt at something. It can also describe a situation where someone is caught or apprehended by authorities.

  • For instance, “I studied all night for the test, but I still busted it.”
  • In a criminal context, someone might say, “He got busted for selling drugs.”
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might say, “The whole thing was a bust from the start.”

38. Cripple

In slang, “cripple” is often used to describe a situation or action that severely hinders or impairs someone or something. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a significant setback or obstacle.

  • For example, “The lack of funding is crippling our ability to make progress on the project.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “The loss of my job has crippled my finances.”
  • A person discussing a failed plan might say, “The unexpected expenses completely crippled our budget.”

39. Harm

When used as slang, “harm” typically refers to causing damage or negative consequences to someone or something. It can also describe the act of hurting or injuring someone.

  • For instance, “Her words were intended to harm my reputation.”
  • In a physical context, someone might say, “I accidentally harmed myself while cooking.”
  • A person discussing the negative effects of a certain action might say, “Smoking cigarettes can seriously harm your health.”

40. Hurt

In slang, “hurt” is often used to describe the act of causing physical or emotional pain to someone. It can also describe a situation or event that causes distress or harm.

  • For example, “His comments really hurt my feelings.”
  • In a physical context, someone might say, “I hurt my back while lifting heavy boxes.”
  • A person discussing the negative impact of a certain decision might say, “Skipping class can hurt your academic performance.”

41. Undermine

To weaken or sabotage something, often through covert or indirect means. “Undermine” can also refer to eroding or destabilizing the foundation or support of something.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “He’s always trying to undermine my ideas and take credit for them.”
  • In a political context, one might accuse an opponent of “undermining democracy” through dishonest tactics.
  • A teacher might caution a student, “Cheating will undermine your academic integrity and future opportunities.”

42. Sabotage

To deliberately destroy, damage, or disrupt something, often for personal gain or to hinder the success of others. “Sabotage” can also refer to intentionally interfering with a process or system.

  • For instance, a disgruntled employee might sabotage a coworker’s project by deleting important files.
  • In a sports context, a player might accuse an opponent of “sabotaging” their chances of winning by playing dirty.
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Don’t sabotage my diet by bringing over a box of cookies!”

43. Wreckage

The remains or fragments of something that has been destroyed or damaged. “Wreckage” often refers to the aftermath of a disaster, accident, or violent event.

  • For example, after a car crash, a witness might describe the scene as “strewn with wreckage.”
  • In a news report, a journalist might say, “The tornado left a path of destruction and scattered wreckage.”
  • A survivor of a plane crash might recall, “I emerged from the wreckage with only minor injuries.”

44. Tarnish

To damage or diminish the quality, reputation, or image of something or someone. “Tarnish” can also refer to the process of corrosion or discoloration, particularly on metal surfaces.

  • For instance, a scandal might tarnish a politician’s public image and credibility.
  • A critic might argue, “The artist’s latest work tarnishes their previous accomplishments.”
  • A friend might warn, “Be careful what you post online, as it could tarnish your professional reputation.”

45. Flunk

To perform poorly or receive a failing grade in an academic or evaluative setting. “Flunk” is often used colloquially to describe failing a test, course, or overall academic performance.

  • For example, a student might say, “I studied all night, but I still managed to flunk the math exam.”
  • A teacher might inform a student, “If you don’t turn in your assignment, you’ll flunk the class.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “If you don’t start taking school seriously, you’re going to flunk out.”

46. Fizzle

To fizzle means to fail or be unsuccessful. It is often used to describe something that was expected to be exciting or successful but ends up being disappointing or underwhelming.

  • For example, “The party started off with a lot of energy but quickly fizzled out.”
  • A person might say, “The concert was a fizzle. The band didn’t sound as good as they did on the album.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might comment, “The company’s latest product launch was a total fizzle.”

47. Debacle

A debacle refers to a complete failure or a disaster. It is often used to describe a situation that went horribly wrong or resulted in a chaotic and disastrous outcome.

  • For instance, “The project turned into a debacle when key team members quit.”
  • A person might say, “The dinner party was a debacle. The food was burnt, and the guests were unhappy.”
  • In a discussion about a failed political campaign, someone might comment, “The candidate’s scandals turned the campaign into a PR debacle.”

48. Rough

When something is described as rough, it means it is difficult or challenging. It can refer to a situation that is tough to handle or a period of time that is filled with hardships or obstacles.

  • For example, “The exam was rough. I struggled to answer most of the questions.”
  • A person might say, “I had a rough day at work. Everything seemed to go wrong.”
  • In a discussion about a difficult hike, someone might comment, “The terrain was rough, and we had to climb steep hills.”

49. Messed up

Messed up is a slang term that means something is wrong or in a state of disarray. It can also refer to a situation or action that is considered to be morally or ethically wrong.

  • For instance, “I made a mistake and messed up the presentation.”
  • A person might say, “His behavior is messed up. He needs to seek help.”
  • In a discussion about a broken relationship, someone might comment, “The whole situation is messed up. Both parties made poor choices.”

50. Screwed

To be screwed means to be in trouble or facing negative consequences. It is often used to describe a situation where someone is in a difficult or unfavorable position.

  • For example, “I forgot to submit the report on time, and now I’m screwed.”
  • A person might say, “If we don’t find a solution soon, we’re screwed.”
  • In a discussion about a financial crisis, someone might comment, “The economy is screwed if we don’t take immediate action.”

51. Busted

This slang term is often used to describe a situation where someone is caught or in trouble with the law or authority figures.

  • For example, “He got busted for shoplifting at the mall.”
  • In a conversation about getting caught cheating, someone might say, “If you’re not careful, you’ll get busted.”
  • Another usage could be, “I can’t believe he got busted for selling fake tickets to the concert.”

52. Wrecked

This slang term is commonly used to describe a state of extreme fatigue or being heavily intoxicated.

  • For instance, “After pulling an all-nighter, I was completely wrecked.”
  • In a discussion about a wild party, someone might say, “We got absolutely wrecked last night.”
  • Another usage could be, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m too wrecked from last night’s drinking.”

53. Downfall

This term refers to the reason or event that leads to someone’s failure or downfall.

  • For example, “His addiction to drugs was his downfall.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business, someone might say, “Poor management was the downfall of that company.”
  • Another usage could be, “The downfall of their relationship was their inability to communicate effectively.”

54. Hurtful

This term describes something that is emotionally painful or distressing to someone.

  • For instance, “Her comments were really hurtful.”
  • In a conversation about a breakup, someone might say, “He said some really hurtful things to me.”
  • Another usage could be, “It’s important to think before you speak to avoid saying something hurtful.”

55. Cursed

This slang term is often used to describe a period of time where someone seems to be experiencing a string of bad luck or unfortunate events.

  • For example, “I feel like I’m cursed, everything keeps going wrong.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s losing streak, someone might say, “They’re cursed this season.”
  • Another usage could be, “After losing his job and getting into a car accident, he felt like he was cursed.”

56. Damaging

This term refers to something that causes harm or negative effects.

  • For example, “The storm caused damaging winds and flooding.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “The cheating was incredibly damaging to their trust.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful with that tool, it can be quite damaging if used improperly.”

57. Ruinous

This slang term describes something that causes complete ruin or destruction.

  • For instance, “The fire was ruinous, destroying the entire building.”
  • In a conversation about financial decisions, someone might say, “Investing all your money in that risky venture could be ruinous.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t make that mistake, it can have ruinous consequences.”

58. Disastrous

This term refers to something that is extremely harmful, disastrous, or causing great damage.

  • For example, “The earthquake had disastrous effects on the city.”
  • In a discussion about failed projects, someone might say, “The lack of planning led to a disastrous outcome.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t ignore the warning signs, it could be catastrophic.”

59. Catastrophic

This slang term describes something that is extremely destructive or causes severe damage.

  • For instance, “The hurricane had catastrophic effects on the coastal town.”
  • In a conversation about accidents, someone might say, “The collision was catastrophic, resulting in multiple injuries.”
  • A person might warn, “Don’t underestimate the potential for catastrophic consequences.”

60. Devastating

This term refers to something that causes severe emotional or physical damage.

  • For example, “The news of her passing was devastating to her family.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The team suffered a devastating loss in the championship.”
  • A person might warn, “That criticism can be absolutely devastating to someone’s self-esteem.”

61. Harmful

This term is used to describe something that is potentially dangerous or harmful. It suggests that the thing in question should be approached with caution.

  • For example, someone might say, “I heard that the food at that restaurant is sketchy, so I’m not going there.”
  • In a discussion about a new medication, a person might comment, “I read some sketchy reviews about the side effects.”
  • A person warning their friend about a certain neighborhood might say, “That area can be pretty sketchy at night, so be careful.”

62. Injurious

This slang term is used to describe something that is severely damaging or harmful. It implies that the thing in question has caused significant negative consequences.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I drank way too much last night and now I feel completely wrecked.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of smoking, a person might say, “Smoking is known to wreck your lungs.”
  • A person describing a car accident might say, “The collision wrecked both vehicles and caused serious injuries.”

63. Deleterious

This slang term is used to describe something that is causing harm or damage. It suggests that the thing in question is negatively impacting a situation or individual.

  • For example, someone might say, “That toxic relationship is really messing up my friend.”
  • In a discussion about the effects of pollution, a person might comment, “The pollutants in the air are messing up our planet.”
  • A person describing the consequences of a poor decision might say, “His reckless behavior is really messing up his life.”

64. Destructive

This term is used to describe something that is causing extensive damage or destruction. It implies that the thing in question is having a significant negative impact.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The tornado is wreaking havoc on the town.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, a person might comment, “Drug abuse can be incredibly destructive to a person’s life.”
  • A person describing a destructive fire might say, “The flames were so intense, they were wreaking havoc on everything in their path.”

65. Negative

This slang term is used to describe something that is having a negative or depressing effect. It suggests that the thing in question is causing someone to feel down or unhappy.

  • For example, someone might say, “The rainy weather is really bumming me out.”
  • In a discussion about a disappointing movie, a person might comment, “The film was a real bummer – it had a lot of negative reviews.”
  • A person describing a sad event might say, “The loss of a loved one can really bum you out for a long time.”

66. Unhealthy

This term is often used to describe food that is high in calories, sugar, and unhealthy fats. It refers to food that is detrimental to one’s physical health.

  • For example, “Eating too much junk food can lead to weight gain and other health issues.”
  • A person might say, “I need to cut back on the unhealthy snacks and start eating more fruits and vegetables.”
  • In a conversation about dieting, someone might comment, “I’ve been trying to eliminate unhealthy foods from my meals.”

67. Unfortunate

This term is used to describe events or situations that are unlucky or unfavorable. It refers to something that is detrimental or unfortunate.

  • For instance, “It’s unfortunate that it rained on our wedding day.”
  • In a discussion about accidents, someone might say, “It’s unfortunate that I got into a car crash, but thankfully no one was hurt.”
  • A person might comment, “It’s unfortunate that I didn’t get the job, but I’ll keep trying.”

68. Unlucky

This term refers to a person who is consistently unlucky or experiences a string of unfortunate events. It is often used in a light-hearted or joking manner.

  • For example, “I’m so unlucky that I always miss the bus by a few seconds.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might say, “Our team is so unlucky, we always lose in the final minutes.”
  • A person might comment, “I feel like I’m jinxed, nothing ever goes my way.”

69. Undesirable

This term is used to describe something or someone that is not wanted or preferred. It refers to something that is detrimental or not desirable.

  • For instance, “The job offer came with some undesirable conditions.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I ended the relationship because of undesirable behavior.”
  • A person might comment, “That neighborhood has become undesirable due to an increase in crime.”

70. Toxic

This term is used to describe something or someone that is detrimental, harmful, or toxic. It refers to behavior, relationships, or environments that are unhealthy or damaging.

  • For example, “She ended the toxic friendship because it was causing her emotional distress.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “The toxic work environment is affecting employee morale.”
  • A person might comment, “It’s important to cut toxic people out of your life for your own well-being.”

71. Ruined

This term is used to describe something that has been completely ruined or rendered useless.

  • For example, “The rain ruined our picnic.”
  • A person might say, “My car broke down and now it’s ruined.”
  • In a discussion about a failed business venture, someone might comment, “The poor management decisions ruined the company.”

72. Jinxed

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is believed to bring bad luck.

  • For instance, “Every time I wear this shirt, something bad happens. It’s jinxed!”
  • A person might say, “I feel like I’m jinxed. Every time I try something, it goes wrong.”
  • In a conversation about a sports team’s losing streak, someone might comment, “They’re jinxed this season.”

73. Doomed

This term is used to describe a situation or person that is likely to have a negative outcome.

  • For example, “The project is doomed from the start. The deadline is impossible to meet.”
  • A person might say, “I knew our relationship was doomed. We had too many differences.”
  • In a discussion about a failing business, someone might comment, “The lack of funding is a sign that the company is doomed.”

74. FUBAR

This acronym is used to describe something that is completely messed up or beyond repair.

  • For instance, “The party was supposed to be a success, but everything went FUBAR.”
  • A person might say, “I tried to fix my computer, but I ended up making it FUBAR.”
  • In a conversation about a disastrous event, someone might comment, “The storm left the town’s infrastructure FUBAR.”

75. Derailed

This term is used to describe a situation or plan that has gone off course or been disrupted.

  • For example, “The meeting was derailed by a heated argument.”
  • A person might say, “My day got derailed when my car broke down.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might comment, “The lack of communication derailed the entire team’s progress.”

76. Crippled

This term is often used to describe someone who is physically disabled or has suffered a severe injury that affects their mobility or functionality.

  • For example, “He was in a car accident and now he’s crippled.”
  • In a discussion about accessibility, someone might say, “People with disabilities often face challenges in a world that is not always accommodating.”
  • Another example could be, “The athlete’s career was cut short by a crippling knee injury.”

77. Debilitating

This word refers to something that greatly weakens or impairs a person’s ability to function normally.

  • For instance, “The flu can be debilitating, causing extreme fatigue and body aches.”
  • In a discussion about chronic illness, someone might say, “Living with a debilitating condition can be mentally and physically exhausting.”
  • Another example could be, “The team’s loss in the championship game was a debilitating blow to their morale.”

78. Pernicious

This term is used to describe something that is subtly or gradually causing great harm or damage.

  • For example, “The pernicious effects of smoking can lead to serious health problems.”
  • In a discussion about toxic relationships, someone might say, “Emotional abuse can have pernicious effects on a person’s self-esteem.”
  • Another example could be, “The pernicious influence of social media can negatively impact mental health.”

79. Malefic

This word describes something or someone that has a malevolent or harmful influence.

  • For instance, “The malefic intentions of the villain led to the downfall of the hero.”
  • In a discussion about curses or hexes, someone might say, “Beware of malefic spirits that can bring misfortune upon you.”
  • Another example could be, “The malefic effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent.”

80. Baneful

This term describes something that is harmful or destructive, often leading to disastrous consequences.

  • For example, “The baneful impact of deforestation on the environment cannot be ignored.”
  • In a discussion about addiction, someone might say, “Drug abuse can have baneful effects on a person’s health and relationships.”
  • Another example could be, “The baneful influence of propaganda can manipulate public opinion and lead to division.”

81. Noxious

This word refers to something that is harmful, toxic, or damaging to one’s health or well-being.

  • For example, “The fumes from the factory were noxious and caused many people to become sick.”
  • A person might say, “I had to leave the room because the smell was so noxious.”
  • In a discussion about environmental pollution, someone might mention, “The release of chemicals into the river is having a noxious effect on the wildlife.”

82. Malign

To malign someone or something is to speak ill of them or to make false and damaging statements about them.

  • For instance, “He was constantly maligning his ex-girlfriend, spreading rumors about her.”
  • A person might say, “It’s not right to malign someone’s character without any evidence.”
  • In a political context, someone might accuse their opponent of trying to malign their reputation for personal gain.
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