Top 29 Slang For Dictation – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to taking notes or transcribing conversations, having a shorthand or set of slang terms can make the process much smoother. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang for dictation that will not only streamline your workflow but also make you feel like a pro in the world of transcription. Stay tuned to discover these essential terms and elevate your dictation game like never before!

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1. Taking notes

This phrase refers to the act of writing down or documenting information for future reference or study. It implies a more active and intentional approach to note-taking.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’ll be taking notes during the lecture.”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask, “Are you taking notes on this discussion?”
  • A journalist might mention, “I always carry a notepad to take notes during interviews.”

2. Jotting down

This phrase means to quickly write or make a brief note of something. It suggests a more casual or informal approach to note-taking, often done in a hurry.

  • For instance, if someone shares a phone number, you might say, “Let me jot that down.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “I’ll jot down the main ideas as we go.”
  • A person might mention, “I always carry a small notebook for jotting down ideas on the go.”

3. Scribbling

This term refers to the act of writing quickly and carelessly, often with messy or illegible handwriting. It implies a lack of precision or neatness in note-taking.

  • For example, a teacher might scold a student, “Stop scribbling and write neatly.”
  • In a rush, someone might mention, “I’m just scribbling down some last-minute reminders.”
  • A person might say, “I scribble down my thoughts in a journal before they slip away.”

4. Transcribing

This refers to the process of listening to spoken words or recordings and writing them down verbatim. It is often used in the context of transcribing interviews, speeches, or audio recordings.

  • For instance, a transcriptionist might say, “I’ll be transcribing the interview for you.”
  • In a research project, someone might mention, “I’m transcribing the focus group discussions.”
  • A journalist might note, “Transcribing audio recordings is a time-consuming task, but it ensures accuracy.”

5. Writing up

This phrase means to create a more formal or polished document based on notes or rough drafts. It implies a process of refining and organizing information into a final written form.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to start writing up my research paper.”
  • In a business setting, someone might mention, “I’ll be writing up the meeting minutes.”
  • A writer might note, “After gathering all the necessary information, I’ll start writing up the article.”

6. Noting

This refers to the act of writing down or recording important information or details. “Noting” is a slang term often used to describe the process of taking notes during a lecture, meeting, or any other situation where information needs to be documented.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I’ll be noting down the key points from the professor’s lecture.”
  • During a business meeting, someone might be asked, “Could you please start noting the action items?”
  • A journalist might say, “I’ll be noting any significant quotes from the interviewee.”

7. Doodling

This term refers to the act of making random or spontaneous drawings, often without any specific purpose or intention. “Doodling” is commonly associated with absent-minded or idle drawing.

  • For example, during a boring class, a student might start doodling in their notebook.
  • A person waiting on hold during a phone call might doodle on a piece of paper to pass the time.
  • In a meeting, someone might doodle in the margins of their agenda while listening to the discussion.
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8. Copying

In the context of dictation, “copying” refers to the act of reproducing or replicating written or spoken content. This can involve transcribing information from one source to another or simply duplicating existing text.

  • For instance, a student might be asked to copy a passage from a textbook into their notebook.
  • In an office setting, someone might be tasked with copying handwritten notes onto a computer for easier sharing and storage.
  • A writer might copy a quote from a book to include in their own work.

9. Documenting

This term refers to the act of recording or documenting information or events. “Documenting” often involves capturing details, facts, or evidence in a written or digital format for future reference or preservation.

  • For example, a photographer might document a social event by taking photos.
  • A historian might document historical events by writing detailed accounts.
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might document their findings in a lab notebook.

10. Logging

In the context of dictation, “logging” refers to the act of recording or keeping a log of events, actions, or data. This can involve maintaining a chronological record of activities or documenting specific details for future reference.

  • For instance, a pilot might log their flight hours in a logbook.
  • A software developer might log errors or bugs encountered during the development process.
  • A security guard might log visitors entering and exiting a building.

11. Recording

The act of capturing sound or images using a device such as a microphone or camera. “Recording” can refer to both the process of capturing and the resulting audio or video file.

  • For example, “I’m going to start recording the meeting now.”
  • A musician might say, “I spent all day in the studio recording my new album.”
  • A podcaster might ask, “Is everyone ready to start recording the episode?”

12. Notating

The act of writing down or transcribing information, usually in a structured or organized manner. “Notating” is commonly used when referring to writing down music.

  • For instance, a music teacher might say, “Make sure you’re notating the correct rhythm.”
  • A composer might explain, “The process of notating music allows others to perform it exactly as intended.”
  • A student might ask, “Can you help me with notating this melody?”

13. Scripting

The act of writing a script or dialogue for a play, movie, or other performance. “Scripting” involves creating the written words that actors will speak or follow.

  • For example, a screenwriter might say, “I’m currently scripting a new television series.”
  • A director might give feedback, “The dialogue needs some work. Can you spend some time scripting it?”
  • A theater student might ask, “Do you have any tips for scripting realistic dialogue?”

14. Scribing

The act of writing or copying information by hand. “Scribing” can refer to the process of transcribing or copying text.

  • For instance, a medieval monk might spend hours scribing a religious text.
  • A calligrapher might say, “I enjoy scribing quotes and poems.”
  • A student might ask, “How can I improve my scribing skills?”

15. Typing up

The act of transcribing or converting handwritten or spoken words into digital text using a keyboard. “Typing up” is commonly used when referring to the process of creating a digital version of written or spoken content.

  • For example, a secretary might say, “I’ll start typing up the meeting minutes.”
  • A writer might explain, “I prefer typing up my notes rather than handwriting them.”
  • A journalist might ask, “Can you help me with typing up this interview?”

16. Composing

This refers to the act of creating or writing something, such as a document or a piece of music. In dictation, it means to write down the words being spoken.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Please compose a short essay on this topic.”
  • In a music class, a student might be asked to compose a melody for a song.
  • When taking dictation, a person might say, “I am composing what you are saying.”

17. Drafting

This term refers to the process of writing a rough or preliminary version of a document or text. In dictation, it means to write down the words as they are being spoken.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I am currently drafting a new article.”
  • In a legal setting, a lawyer might be drafting a contract.
  • During dictation, a person might say, “Please start drafting what I am about to say.”

18. Listing

Listing refers to the act of making a list of items or things. In dictation, it means to write down the items or points being mentioned.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I am listing all the ingredients for the recipe.”
  • In a meeting, someone might be listing the agenda items.
  • During dictation, a person might say, “Please start listing the items I am about to mention.”

19. Registering

Registering means to officially record or enter information into a system or register. In dictation, it means to write down the information being provided.

  • For example, a person might say, “I am registering for the conference.”
  • In a hospital, a patient might be asked to register their personal information.
  • During dictation, a person might say, “Please start registering the data I am about to give.”

20. Tallying

Tallying refers to the act of counting or adding up numbers or scores. In dictation, it means to write down the numbers or scores being mentioned.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Please start tallying the scores for the quiz.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might be tallying the points for each team.
  • During dictation, a person might say, “Please start tallying the numbers I am about to say.”

21. Inscribing

This term refers to the act of writing something down, usually by hand. It can be used in various contexts to indicate the action of taking dictation or recording information.

  • For example, a secretary might say, “I’ll start inscribing the meeting minutes.”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might instruct students, “Please inscribe the following notes in your notebooks.”
  • A journalist might mention, “I was inscribing the interviewee’s responses as quickly as I could.”

22. Penciling in

This phrase is often used to describe the act of making a temporary or tentative note, usually with a pencil, to indicate something that may change or be subject to revision.

  • For instance, a scheduler might say, “I’m penciling in the meeting for next Tuesday, but it’s not confirmed yet.”
  • In a personal planner, someone might write, “Penciling in a reminder to call the doctor next week.”
  • A student might mention, “I’m penciling in time to study for the exam, but I might adjust it based on other commitments.”

23. Dictee

This term refers to a dictation exercise, where a person listens to spoken words or sentences and writes them down as accurately as possible. It is often used in language learning or educational contexts.

  • For example, a language teacher might say, “Let’s practice our listening skills with a dictee.”
  • In a French class, a student might mention, “We had a difficult dictee today, but I think I did well.”
  • A language learner might ask, “Do you have any tips for improving my accuracy in dictees?”

24. Dicto

This term is a shortened form of “dictation” and is often used in informal or slang contexts. It refers to the act of someone speaking while another person writes down what is being said.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I need you to take a dicto of this email and send it out to the team.”
  • In a creative writing workshop, an instructor might mention, “We’ll start with a dicto exercise to get our creative juices flowing.”
  • A secretary might ask, “Do you prefer dicto or typing for taking notes during meetings?”

25. Verbatim

This term is used to indicate that something is being quoted or repeated exactly as it was originally spoken or written, without any changes or omissions.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “I will read the witness’s statement verbatim.”
  • In a research paper, a student might mention, “I included the interview transcript verbatim in the appendix.”
  • A journalist might note, “The article quoted the politician’s speech verbatim to ensure accuracy.”

26. Parroting

Parroting refers to the act of repeating something without fully understanding its meaning or implications. It is often used to describe someone who mindlessly repeats information without critical thinking or analysis.

  • For example, a student might be accused of parroting their teacher’s ideas without forming their own opinions.
  • In a political debate, one person might accuse another of parroting party talking points without considering alternative viewpoints.
  • A critic might describe a book as parroting clichéd themes and ideas without offering anything original.
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27. Notetaking

Notetaking is the process of recording information in written form, typically during a lecture, meeting, or presentation. It involves capturing key points, ideas, and details to refer back to later.

  • For instance, a student might take notes during a lecture to help them study for an exam.
  • In a business meeting, participants might take notes to remember action items and important discussion points.
  • A journalist might take notes during an interview to ensure accurate reporting of quotes and details.

28. Stenography

Stenography is a method of rapid writing that uses symbols or shorthand to represent words or phrases. It is commonly used by court reporters, secretaries, and transcriptionists to quickly and accurately record spoken language.

  • For example, a court stenographer might use a specialized machine to transcribe courtroom proceedings in real time.
  • In the business world, a stenographer might be hired to take dictation during meetings or conferences.
  • Some individuals learn stenography as a personal skill to increase their writing speed and efficiency.

29. Voice-to-text

Voice-to-text technology allows users to convert spoken words or audio recordings into written text. It is commonly used in smartphones, transcription software, and virtual assistants to facilitate hands-free communication and efficient data entry.

  • For instance, a person can dictate a text message to their phone, which will then convert their spoken words into written text.
  • In the medical field, doctors might use voice-to-text software to quickly transcribe patient notes and records.
  • A writer might use voice-to-text technology to capture their ideas and thoughts without the need for manual typing.