Top 12 Slang For Digress – Meaning & Usage

When conversations veer off track and wander into unexpected territories, it’s easy to find yourself in a spiral of digressions. But fear not, as we’re here to help you navigate this linguistic maze with our curated list of slang for digress. Stay tuned to uncover the perfect words to express those off-topic moments and keep your conversations on point!

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1. Wander off topic

This phrase refers to veering away or deviating from the main topic of discussion.

  • For instance, during a meeting, someone might say, “Sorry to wander off topic, but I have a related question.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might be reminded, “Let’s not wander off topic, we need to stay focused on the lesson.”
  • During a debate, someone might interject, “I think we’re starting to wander off topic here, let’s get back to the main issue.”

2. Diverge from the topic

This phrase means to move away from the main topic and start discussing something unrelated.

  • For example, in a group discussion, someone might say, “Sorry to diverge from the topic, but this reminds me of a similar situation I experienced.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might acknowledge, “I’m going to diverge from the topic briefly to provide some context.”
  • In a conversation, one person might ask, “Can we please not diverge from the topic? We need to stay focused.”

3. Lose the thread

This phrase describes the act of forgetting or losing sight of the main point or topic of discussion.

  • For instance, during a debate, someone might say, “I apologize, I seem to have lost the thread. Can you please repeat the question?”
  • In a meeting, a participant might admit, “I’m sorry, I got caught up in the details and lost the thread of the discussion.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might pause and say, “I think I’m losing the thread here, let me backtrack and clarify.”

4. Get off track

This phrase means to deviate or move away from the intended focus or main point of a conversation or discussion.

  • For example, in a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s not get off track, we need to address the main issue.”
  • During a brainstorming session, a participant might remind the group, “We’re starting to get off track, let’s refocus on our original goal.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might redirect a student by saying, “Please don’t get off track, we need to stick to the topic we’re discussing.”

5. Ramble on

This phrase refers to speaking in a long-winded, disorganized, or incoherent manner, often without a clear point or direction.

  • For instance, during a presentation, someone might say, “Sorry for rambling on, I’ll try to get to the main points.”
  • In a conversation, one person might ask, “Could you please stop rambling on and get to the point?”
  • During a meeting, someone might interject, “Let’s not ramble on, we need to stay focused and efficient.”

6. Get off on a different path

This phrase means to deviate from the main topic or subject and start discussing something unrelated. It implies that the person is taking a different direction in the conversation or discussion.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “Sorry to get off on a different path, but I have an idea unrelated to the current topic.”
  • In a classroom discussion, a student might interject, “Can I get off on a different path for a moment? I have a related point to make.”
  • During a debate, a debater might accuse their opponent of trying to get off on a different path to avoid addressing the main argument.
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7. Stray from the main point

To stray from the main point means to veer away from the central topic or subject of a conversation or discussion. It implies that the person is not staying focused on the main issue or argument.

  • For instance, during a presentation, someone might say, “Sorry for straying from the main point, but I think this related information is important.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might remind others, “Let’s not stray from the main point and stick to the agenda.”
  • During a debate, a moderator might interrupt and say, “Please do not stray from the main point. Let’s keep the discussion focused.”

8. Diverge from the subject

To diverge from the subject means to go off on a tangent or start discussing something unrelated to the main topic. It suggests that the person is deviating from the main focus of the conversation or discussion.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s not diverge from the subject at hand. We need to address the main issue.”
  • During a lecture, a professor might warn students, “Try not to diverge from the subject. Stay focused on the main concepts.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might laugh and say, “Sorry for diverging from the subject. I just thought of something funny.”

9. Drift away from the topic

To drift away from the topic means to stray or wander from the main subject of a conversation or discussion. It implies that the person is losing focus and starting to talk about something unrelated.

  • For instance, during a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s not drift away from the topic. We need to stay on track.”
  • In a class discussion, a student might apologize, “Sorry for drifting away from the topic. I got carried away with my personal experience.”
  • During a brainstorming session, someone might redirect the conversation, “Let’s not drift away from the topic. We should focus on generating ideas related to the main problem.”

10. Digress

To digress means to depart from the main subject or topic of a conversation or discussion. It suggests that the person is going off on a tangent or deviating from the central focus.

  • For example, during a presentation, someone might say, “Apologies for digressing, but I think this related information is crucial.”
  • In a debate, a participant might interrupt and say, “Let’s not digress. We need to address the main argument.”
  • During a meeting, someone might acknowledge, “I digress, but I believe this tangential point is worth considering.”

11. Deviate from the focus

This phrase means to stray away from the main subject or focus of a conversation or discussion. It implies that someone is not staying on track and is instead talking about something unrelated.

  • For example, during a meeting, someone might say, “Sorry to deviate from the focus, but I have a question about the budget.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might be told, “Please don’t deviate from the focus of the lesson.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might acknowledge, “I’ll try not to deviate from the focus, but there’s an interesting point I want to mention.”

12. Stray from the subject

This phrase means to divert or wander away from the main subject or topic being discussed. It implies that someone is going off on a tangent and not staying focused on the main point.

  • For instance, in a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s not stray from the subject and stick to the agenda.”
  • During a debate, a participant might accuse their opponent of “straying from the subject” to avoid addressing a certain point.
  • In a classroom, a teacher might remind students, “Please don’t stray from the subject and keep your answers relevant.”