Top 59 Slang For Directions – Meaning & Usage

Navigating the urban jungle can be a daunting task, especially when you’re trying to keep up with the latest slang for directions. Whether you’re a seasoned traveler or just looking to up your street smarts, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil the hip and trendy ways to get from point A to point B in style. Get ready to hit the road with confidence and swagger!

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1. Northbound

This term refers to traveling in the direction of the north. It is commonly used to indicate the direction of a road or transportation route.

  • For example, a driver might ask, “Is this train going northbound?”
  • A traveler might say, “Take the northbound highway to reach the city.”
  • A hiker might advise, “Follow the northbound trail to reach the summit.”

2. Southbound

This term refers to traveling in the direction of the south. It is commonly used to indicate the direction of a road or transportation route.

  • For instance, a passenger might ask, “Is this bus going southbound?”
  • A road trip planner might suggest, “Take the southbound lane to get to the beach.”
  • A commuter might say, “I take the southbound train to work every day.”

3. Eastbound

This term refers to traveling in the direction of the east. It is commonly used to indicate the direction of a road or transportation route.

  • For example, a driver might ask, “Which way is eastbound on this highway?”
  • A traveler might say, “Head eastbound to reach the airport.”
  • A cyclist might advise, “Take the eastbound bike path to get to downtown.”

4. Westbound

This term refers to traveling in the direction of the west. It is commonly used to indicate the direction of a road or transportation route.

  • For instance, a passenger might ask, “Does this train go westbound?”
  • A road trip planner might suggest, “Take the westbound highway to reach the national park.”
  • A commuter might say, “I usually take the westbound bus to go home.”

This phrase is used to indicate the general direction in which to travel or move.

  • For example, a local might say, “Head towards the city center to find the best restaurants.”
  • A tour guide might instruct, “Head towards the beach for some sun and relaxation.”
  • A hiker might advise, “Head towards the mountains to enjoy breathtaking views.”

6. Hang a left

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a left turn. It suggests a casual, informal way of giving directions.

  • For example, “When you reach the intersection, hang a left and you’ll see the store on the right.”
  • A local might say, “Hang a left at the next traffic light and you’ll find the park entrance.”
  • Giving directions to a friend, you might say, “Hang a left after the gas station, and you’ll see my house on the right.”

7. Take a right

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a right turn. It is a common and straightforward way of giving directions.

  • For instance, “When you reach the stop sign, take a right and you’ll see the restaurant on the left.”
  • A driver might say, “Take a right at the next intersection and you’ll find the highway entrance.”
  • Instructing someone to their destination, you might say, “Take a right after the bridge, and the hotel will be on your left.”

8. Go straight

This phrase is used to instruct someone to continue moving forward without turning. It implies that there are no immediate turns to be made.

  • For example, “Keep going straight until you reach the traffic light.”
  • A pedestrian might say, “Just go straight for a few blocks, and you’ll see the park on your right.”
  • Giving directions to a driver, you might say, “Go straight through two more intersections, and the mall will be on your left.”

9. Make a U-turn

This phrase is used to instruct someone to turn their vehicle around in the opposite direction. It is typically used when a wrong turn has been made or when the desired destination requires going back in the opposite direction.

  • For instance, “Oops, we missed the exit. Let’s make a U-turn at the next opportunity.”
  • A driver might say, “You’ll need to make a U-turn at the roundabout to get back on the right road.”
  • Giving directions, you might say, “After the bridge, make a U-turn at the second traffic light, and you’ll find the parking lot.”

10. Follow the signs

This phrase is used to instruct someone to pay attention to and follow the directions indicated by road signs.

  • For example, “To reach the museum, follow the signs for ‘Tourist Attractions’.”
  • A local might say, “If you’re looking for the highway, just follow the signs that say ‘Interstate’.”
  • Giving directions to a visitor, you might say, “Follow the signs for ‘Airport’ until you see the exit for downtown.”

11. Keep going straight

This phrase is used to instruct someone to continue moving forward without making any turns.

  • For example, “Keep going straight until you reach the traffic lights.”
  • A driver might say, “Keep going straight for another mile and then turn right.”
  • A hiker might be told, “Keep going straight on the trail until you see a signpost.”

12. Veer to the right

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a slight right turn or change their direction slightly to the right.

  • For instance, “Veer to the right after the second intersection.”
  • A cyclist might say, “Veer to the right to avoid the pothole.”
  • A tour guide might instruct, “Veer to the right when you see the statue in the park.”

13. Veer to the left

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a slight left turn or change their direction slightly to the left.

  • For example, “Veer to the left at the fork in the road.”
  • A hiker might say, “Veer to the left to reach the lookout point.”
  • A driver might be told, “Veer to the left to merge onto the highway.”

14. Exit here

This phrase is used to indicate a specific location where someone should exit or leave the current road they are on.

  • For instance, “Take the next exit here to get to the shopping center.”
  • A passenger might say, “Exit here and then turn left at the traffic lights.”
  • A driver might be instructed, “Exit here to access the airport terminal.”

15. Stay on this road

This phrase is used to instruct someone to continue traveling on the current road without making any turns or exits.

  • For example, “Stay on this road until you see a gas station on your right.”
  • A cyclist might say, “Stay on this road for another mile and then turn left.”
  • A driver might be told, “Stay on this road until you reach the roundabout.”

16. Merge onto

This phrase is commonly used when giving directions to someone who needs to enter a highway or freeway. It means to smoothly transition from a smaller road onto a larger road, such as a highway or freeway.

  • For example, “Take the next right and merge onto the highway.”
  • A person might ask, “Do I need to merge onto the interstate to get to the airport?”
  • Another might give directions like, “After the stop sign, merge onto the main road and continue straight.”

17. Take the next exit

This phrase is used when instructing someone to leave a highway or freeway. It means to use the next available exit to exit the highway and continue on a smaller road or to reach a specific destination.

  • For instance, “In half a mile, take the next exit and turn left.”
  • A person might ask, “Which exit should I take to get to the shopping mall?”
  • Another might give directions like, “After the bridge, take the next exit and follow the signs for downtown.”

18. Double back

This phrase is used when someone needs to turn around and go back in the opposite direction. It can be used when someone has missed a turn or needs to return to a previous location.

  • For example, “We missed our turn, so we need to double back and take the next left.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a place to turn around if I accidentally pass the restaurant?”
  • Another might give directions like, “After the traffic light, double back and take the first right.”

19. Loop around

This phrase is used when someone needs to follow a curved or circular path to reach their destination. It can be used when there is no direct route or when it is necessary to navigate around obstacles.

  • For instance, “Instead of turning left, loop around the roundabout and take the second exit.”
  • A person might ask, “How do I get to the parking lot if I can’t turn left?”
  • Another might give directions like, “After the bridge, loop around the traffic circle and take the third exit.”

20. Hang a right at the corner

This phrase is used when someone needs to make a right turn at a street corner or intersection. It is a more casual and colloquial way of giving directions.

  • For example, “When you reach the stop sign, hang a right at the corner.”
  • A person might ask, “Which way do I go after I pass the park?”
  • Another might give directions like, “After the traffic light, hang a right at the corner and continue straight.”

21. North Star

This term refers to the star that is positioned directly above the Earth’s North Pole. It has been used for centuries as a navigational tool, guiding travelers in the right direction.

  • For example, someone might say, “Follow the North Star and you’ll find your way.”
  • In a metaphorical sense, a person might say, “She’s my North Star, always guiding me in life.”
  • A hiker might use the term to give directions, saying, “Just keep walking towards the North Star and you’ll reach the summit.”

22. Left at the big tree

This phrase is a simple way of giving directions by using a prominent landmark as a reference point. It instructs the listener to make a left turn at a specific tree that is easily recognizable.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Keep going straight and then take a left at the big tree.”
  • In a conversation about navigation, one person might ask, “Do I turn left at the big tree or the small one?”
  • A driver might say, “I missed the turn at the big tree. Now we’re lost.”

This expression is used to indicate that something is located in close proximity or is about to happen soon. It suggests that the destination or desired location is just a short distance away.

  • For example, someone might say, “The restaurant is right around the corner, you can’t miss it.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up with a friend, one person might say, “I’ll be there in a minute, I’m right around the corner.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Continue straight and it’ll be right around the corner on your right.”

24. Straight as an arrow

This phrase is used to describe something that is perfectly aligned or follows a straight path without any deviations. It implies that the route or direction being taken is straightforward and without any twists or turns.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Just keep going straight as an arrow and you’ll reach the destination.”
  • In a discussion about navigation, one person might say, “I prefer routes that are straight as an arrow, they’re easier to follow.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Walk straight as an arrow for about a mile, and you’ll see the building on your left.”

This phrase is a poetic way of giving directions by using the position of the sun as a reference point. It instructs the listener to travel in the direction where the sun sets, typically in the west.

  • For example, someone might say, “Just head towards the sunset and you’ll find the beach.”
  • In a conversation about finding a specific location, one person might say, “The restaurant is in the town square, just head towards the sunset.”
  • A person giving directions might say, “Keep walking along this path until you’re heading towards the sunset, then take a right.”

26. Follow the river

This slang phrase means to continue moving in the same direction as the river. It is often used when giving directions or describing a route that follows a river.

  • For example, “To get to the campsite, just follow the river for about two miles.”
  • A local might say, “If you’re lost, just follow the river and it will lead you back to town.”
  • When hiking, a guide might instruct, “For the best views, follow the river trail.”

27. Take a U-ey

This slang phrase means to make a U-turn, which is a maneuver where a driver turns their vehicle around in a U-shaped manner in order to go in the opposite direction.

  • For instance, “I missed the exit, so I had to take a U-ey and go back.”
  • When giving driving directions, someone might say, “At the next intersection, take a U-ey and then turn left.”
  • A friend might joke, “I made a wrong turn and ended up taking a U-ey in someone’s driveway.”

28. Hang a Louie

This slang phrase means to make a left turn. It is a playful and informal way of giving directions or describing a turn.

  • For example, “At the traffic light, hang a Louie and you’ll see the store on your right.”
  • When discussing a route, someone might say, “After the bridge, hang a Louie and you’ll be on the right track.”
  • A driver might ask, “Should I hang a Louie or a Ralph to get to the restaurant?”

29. Hang a Ralph

This slang phrase means to make a right turn. It is a playful and informal way of giving directions or describing a turn.

  • For instance, “At the stop sign, hang a Ralph and you’ll see the park entrance.”
  • When discussing a route, someone might say, “After the gas station, hang a Ralph and you’ll reach the highway.”
  • A driver might ask, “Should I hang a Ralph or a Louie to get to the mall?”

30. Go down yonder

This slang phrase means to go in a particular direction, often pointing to a place that is nearby or within sight.

  • For example, “To find the farm, just go down yonder and you’ll see it on the left.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Go down yonder until you reach the big oak tree.”
  • A local might say, “If you’re looking for the beach, just go down yonder and you’ll find it.”

31. Keep on truckin’

This phrase is used to encourage someone to keep going or to continue with their current course of action. It is often used to express perseverance or determination.

  • For example, if someone is facing a difficult task, you might say, “Just keep on truckin’ and you’ll get through it.”
  • In a motivational speech, a speaker might say, “Life is full of challenges, but if you keep on truckin’, you’ll reach your goals.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “You’re doing great! Just keep on truckin’ and you’ll make it to the finish line.”

32. Go up the hill

This phrase is used to instruct someone to move in an upward direction towards a hill or an elevated area.

  • For instance, if someone is lost and needs directions, you might say, “Just go up the hill and you’ll see the house on the left.”
  • In a hiking guide, it might say, “To reach the summit, go up the hill and follow the trail markers.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “When you see the playground, go up the hill and you’ll find your friends.”

33. Go down the hill

This phrase is used to instruct someone to move in a downward direction away from a hill or an elevated area.

  • For example, if someone is hiking and wants to descend, you might say, “Just go down the hill and you’ll reach the parking lot.”
  • In a driving lesson, an instructor might say, “When you see the stop sign, go down the hill and turn left.”
  • A friend might give directions by saying, “Once you pass the school, go down the hill and you’ll find the store on the right.”

34. Go past the old barn

This phrase is used to instruct someone to continue moving forward beyond a specific landmark, in this case, an old barn.

  • For instance, if someone is looking for a farm, you might say, “Just go past the old barn and you’ll see the farmhouse on the right.”
  • In a treasure hunt, a clue might say, “Go past the old barn and look for the tree with a red ribbon.”
  • A local might give directions by saying, “After the bridge, go past the old barn and you’ll find the hiking trail entrance.”

35. Go through the roundabout

This phrase is used to instruct someone to navigate through a roundabout, which is a circular intersection where traffic flows in a counterclockwise direction.

  • For example, if someone is driving in an unfamiliar city, you might say, “Just go through the roundabout and take the second exit.”
  • In a road trip guide, it might say, “To reach your destination, go through the roundabout and follow the signs.”
  • A local might give directions by saying, “After the traffic light, go through the roundabout and you’ll see the park on the left.”

36. Go over yonder

This phrase is used to indicate going in a specific direction, usually pointing to a location that is nearby but not directly in front of the speaker.

  • For example, “If you go over yonder, you’ll find the old barn.”
  • A person might say, “The store is just over yonder, you can’t miss it.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “Go down this road and turn left over yonder.”

37. Go towards the city lights

This phrase is used to indicate going in the direction where the lights of a city can be seen.

  • For instance, “If you go towards the city lights, you’ll find the downtown area.”
  • A person might say, “To get to the concert venue, just go towards the city lights.”
  • When giving directions at night, someone might say, “Follow the road and go towards the city lights.”

38. Go towards the mountains

This phrase is used to indicate going in the direction where the mountains are located.

  • For example, “If you go towards the mountains, you’ll find some beautiful hiking trails.”
  • A person might say, “To get to the ski resort, just go towards the mountains.”
  • When giving directions in a scenic area, someone might say, “Keep driving and go towards the mountains.”

39. Go towards the ocean

This phrase is used to indicate going in the direction where the ocean can be found.

  • For instance, “If you go towards the ocean, you’ll reach the beach.”
  • A person might say, “To find the seafood restaurant, just go towards the ocean.”
  • When giving directions near a coastal area, someone might say, “Turn right and go towards the ocean.”

40. Go towards the sunrise

This phrase is used to indicate going in the direction where the sun rises.

  • For example, “If you go towards the sunrise, you’ll find a beautiful view.”
  • A person might say, “To see the sunrise, just go towards the east.”
  • When giving directions early in the morning, someone might say, “Keep walking and go towards the sunrise.”

41. Go towards the moonrise

This phrase is often used to give someone a general direction to go in, typically at night when the moon is visible.

  • For example, if someone asks for directions to a party, you might say, “Just go towards the moonrise and you’ll find it.”
  • If someone is lost in a park, you could say, “Go towards the moonrise and you’ll reach the main entrance.”
  • In a conversation about camping, someone might mention, “We set up our tent facing the moonrise for a beautiful view.”

42. Go towards the horizon

This phrase is used to indicate a general direction to go in, typically towards the horizon where the sky meets the land.

  • For instance, if someone is looking for a hiking trail, you might say, “Just go towards the horizon and you’ll find the trailhead.”
  • If someone is lost in a city, you could say, “Go towards the horizon and you’ll reach the downtown area.”
  • In a discussion about photography, someone might say, “I love taking pictures of sunsets, so I always go towards the horizon during golden hour.”

43. Go towards the big city

This phrase is used to indicate a general direction to go in, typically towards a big city or metropolitan area.

  • For example, if someone is driving and asks for directions to the nearest city, you might say, “Just go towards the big city and you’ll find it.”
  • If someone is looking for a specific landmark in a city, you could say, “Go towards the big city and you’ll see it on your left.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “I love exploring new places, so I always go towards the big city when I visit a new country.”

44. Go towards the countryside

This phrase is used to indicate a general direction to go in, typically towards the countryside or areas outside of cities.

  • For instance, if someone is looking for a peaceful retreat, you might say, “Just go towards the countryside and you’ll find a beautiful spot.”
  • If someone is lost in a suburban area, you could say, “Go towards the countryside and you’ll find a more open road.”
  • In a discussion about hiking, someone might say, “I prefer exploring nature, so I always go towards the countryside for my hikes.”

45. Due North

This phrase is used to indicate a specific direction to go in, directly towards the North.

  • For example, if someone is navigating using a compass, you might say, “Just go due North and you’ll reach your destination.”
  • If someone is lost in a dense forest, you could say, “Go due North and you’ll eventually find a trail.”
  • In a conversation about orienteering, someone might mention, “To find the next checkpoint, we had to go due North for half a mile.”

46. Follow the yellow brick road

This phrase is a reference to the famous yellow brick road in the movie “The Wizard of Oz.” It means to follow a clear and straightforward path to reach a goal or destination.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “If you want to succeed in this class, just follow the yellow brick road of hard work and dedication.”
  • In a job interview, someone might say, “I’ve always followed the yellow brick road of continuous learning and personal growth.”
  • A motivational speaker might inspire an audience by saying, “Don’t be afraid to follow your own yellow brick road to success.”

47. Take a hard left

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a sharp or abrupt left turn while driving or navigating.

  • For instance, a driver might say to their passenger, “At the next intersection, take a hard left.”
  • In a car chase scene in a movie, one character might yell to the driver, “Take a hard left, we need to lose them!”
  • A tour guide might say to a group of tourists, “When we reach the museum, we’ll take a hard left to enter the exhibit hall.”

48. Hang a right

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a right turn while driving or navigating. “Hang” in this context means to make a turn or change direction.

  • For example, a friend might say to another, “At the end of this street, hang a right and you’ll see the restaurant.”
  • In a driving lesson, an instructor might say to a student, “At the stop sign, remember to hang a right.”
  • A taxi driver might give directions to a passenger by saying, “After the traffic light, hang a right and we’ll be at your destination.”

49. Take a U-turn

This phrase is used to instruct someone to make a complete 180-degree turn while driving or navigating, effectively turning back in the opposite direction.

  • For instance, a GPS navigation system might say, “In 500 feet, make a legal U-turn if possible.”
  • In a road trip, one person might say to the driver, “We missed the exit, let’s find a safe place to take a U-turn.”
  • A police officer might direct a driver by saying, “At the next intersection, take a U-turn and you’ll see the police station on your right.”

This phrase is a figurative expression used to describe the act of running away or escaping from a dangerous or threatening situation.

  • For example, in a horror movie, a character might say to the group, “There’s a monster coming, let’s head for the hills!”
  • In a survival situation, someone might advise their companion, “If we encounter any danger, let’s head for the hills and find higher ground.”
  • A parent might jokingly say to their child during a game, “If you can’t catch me, you better head for the hills!”

51. Go the whole nine yards

To go the whole distance or complete a task or journey without cutting corners or taking shortcuts. The phrase is often used to encourage someone to give their full effort.

  • For example, a coach might say, “In the final quarter, I want you to go the whole nine yards and give it everything you’ve got.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “Let’s not leave any loose ends. I want you to go the whole nine yards and finish the project.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You’ve trained hard for this marathon. Go the whole nine yards and cross that finish line with pride!”

52. Make a beeline for

To move quickly and directly towards a specific destination without any detours or delays. The phrase is often used to indicate a sense of urgency or determination.

  • For instance, if someone spots their favorite store at the mall, they might say, “I’m going to make a beeline for that shop and check out their new collection.”
  • In a crowded concert venue, a fan might say, “As soon as the gates open, I’m making a beeline for the front row.”
  • A person in a rush might say, “I need to make a beeline for the nearest gas station. I’m running out of fuel.”

53. Go off the beaten path

To deviate from the usual or well-known path and explore alternative or less-traveled routes. The phrase is often used to encourage adventure or to suggest finding unique experiences.

  • For example, a travel blogger might write, “If you want to discover hidden gems, go off the beaten path and explore the local neighborhoods.”
  • When hiking, a guide might suggest, “Let’s go off the beaten path and explore this unmarked trail for a more secluded and serene experience.”
  • A person seeking new opportunities might say, “I’m tired of following the crowd. It’s time for me to go off the beaten path and pursue my own path.”

54. Go around the bend

To become mentally unstable or lose one’s sanity. The phrase is often used figuratively to describe someone’s behavior or state of mind.

  • For instance, if someone starts behaving erratically, a friend might say, “I think they’ve gone around the bend. They’re not acting like themselves.”
  • In a stressful situation, someone might exclaim, “If this keeps up, I’m going to go around the bend!”
  • A person describing a chaotic situation might say, “Everything went around the bend when the power went out and the alarms started blaring.”

55. Go up yonder

To go or move towards a location that is further away or in an upward direction. The phrase is often used in a colloquial or regional manner.

  • For example, a local might say, “If you keep walking straight, you’ll eventually go up yonder and reach the overlook with a stunning view.”
  • When giving directions, someone might say, “After you cross the bridge, go up yonder and you’ll find the small café on the left.”
  • A person describing a remote or distant location might say, “That cabin is nestled up yonder in the mountains, far away from the city noise.”

56. Go down the road

This phrase means to continue moving in a straight line along the road.

  • For example, “To get to the grocery store, go down the road for about two miles.”
  • In a conversation about directions, someone might say, “After the traffic light, just go down the road until you see a gas station.”
  • If someone asks for directions, you could respond with, “Go down the road and take the second left.”

57. Go around the block

This means to make a full loop around the block, usually to return to the starting point.

  • For instance, “If you miss the entrance, just go around the block and try again.”
  • If someone is looking for parking, you might say, “There’s no parking here, but you can go around the block and try the next street.”
  • In a conversation about navigating a crowded area, someone might suggest, “Instead of trying to find a spot here, let’s go around the block and look for parking further down.”

58. Go through the back door

This phrase means to enter a building or location through the back door instead of the front.

  • For example, “To access the garden, you’ll need to go through the back door of the house.”
  • In a conversation about sneaking into a venue, someone might say, “We can avoid the long line if we go through the back door.”
  • If someone is lost in a maze-like building, you could advise them, “Instead of going through the main entrance, try going through the back door to find your way out.”

59. Go over the river and through the woods

This phrase is often used figuratively to mean taking a longer or more scenic route to reach a destination.

  • For instance, “Instead of taking the highway, let’s go over the river and through the woods for a more scenic drive.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might suggest, “We can go over the river and through the woods to reach the beach.”
  • If someone wants to explore a new area, you could say, “Instead of following the main road, why don’t we go over the river and through the woods to discover hidden gems?”
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