Top 42 Slang For Dismiss – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing dismissal or brushing off a situation, language can be a powerful tool. In this article, we’ve rounded up the top slang terms that can help you convey a dismissive attitude with flair. Whether you’re looking to spice up your vocabulary or simply stay in the know, we’ve got you covered with this list of trendy phrases for dismissing the irrelevant.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Axed

This term refers to being fired from a job suddenly and without warning.

  • For example, “He was axed from his position after the company restructured.”
  • In a conversation about layoffs, someone might say, “I heard they axed half the staff yesterday.”
  • A disgruntled employee might vent, “I can’t believe they axed me just because of one mistake.”

2. Canned

This slang term is used to describe being fired or let go from a job.

  • For instance, “She was canned from her position due to budget cuts.”
  • In a discussion about job security, someone might say, “I’m always worried about getting canned.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was canned after my boss found out I was looking for another job.”

3. Pink-slipped

Being pink-slipped means receiving an official notice of termination or layoff from an employer.

  • For example, “He was pink-slipped after the company downsized.”
  • In a conversation about job instability, someone might say, “I’m always worried about getting pink-slipped.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I received a pink slip after the company merged with another.”

4. Let go

To be let go means to be released from employment, either voluntarily or involuntarily.

  • For instance, “She was let go from her position due to poor performance.”
  • In a discussion about downsizing, someone might say, “Many employees were let go during the restructuring.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I decided to let go of my job to pursue my passion.”

5. Sacked

This term is used to describe being fired from a job suddenly and without warning.

  • For example, “He was sacked after being caught stealing from the company.”
  • In a conversation about workplace misconduct, someone might say, “If you get caught lying, you’ll be sacked.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I never saw it coming when I was sacked for a minor mistake.”

6. Terminated

This term is commonly used in employment contexts to refer to being fired or let go from a job. It implies a more formal and final end to the employment relationship.

  • For example, “John was terminated from his position due to repeated tardiness.”
  • A manager might say, “We have to terminate this employee for violating company policies.”
  • In a discussion about job security, someone might comment, “Getting terminated can be a devastating blow to one’s career.”

7. Booted

This slang term refers to being forcefully removed or expelled from a place or situation. It implies a sudden and often unwelcome dismissal.

  • For instance, “The bouncer booted him out of the club for starting a fight.”
  • In a story about a party, someone might say, “They got booted from the party for causing a disturbance.”
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might say, “I finally booted him out of my life for good.”

8. Dropped

This term is used to describe being released or dismissed from a position or responsibility. It can refer to both employment and non-employment contexts.

  • For example, “She was dropped from the team due to poor performance.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might say, “We had to drop him from the team because he wasn’t pulling his weight.”
  • A manager might say, “We had to drop the project due to budget constraints.”

9. Discharged

This term is commonly used in the context of being released from a position or obligation, often with official or formal connotations.

  • For instance, “He was discharged from the military after completing his service.”
  • In a discussion about hospital stays, someone might say, “I was discharged from the hospital after a week of recovery.”
  • A person discussing their legal case might say, “The charges against me were dismissed, and I was discharged from custody.”

10. Let off

This term refers to being released or dismissed without facing punishment or consequences. It implies a leniency or forgiveness in the dismissal.

  • For example, “He was let off with a warning for his first offense.”
  • In a discussion about a disciplinary action, someone might say, “She got lucky and was let off with a suspension.”
  • A person discussing a traffic violation might say, “I was surprised to be let off with just a ticket instead of a fine.”

11. Given the boot

This phrase is used to describe someone being fired or let go from their job or position. It implies that the person was abruptly and forcefully removed from their position.

  • For example, “After consistently showing up late to work, John was given the boot by his boss.”
  • In a discussion about layoffs, someone might say, “Many employees were given the boot due to budget cuts.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you hear that Sarah was given the boot from her internship?”

12. Let out

This phrase is used to describe someone being dismissed or released from a situation or responsibility. It implies that the person is no longer required to be present or fulfill their obligations.

  • For instance, “After the meeting, the employees were let out early for the day.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “I was let out of my work shift early so I can attend.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “You will be let out of class 10 minutes early today.”

13. Sent packing

This phrase is used to describe someone being forced to leave a place or situation. It implies that the person is being told to leave and is not welcome to stay.

  • For example, “After causing a disturbance, the unruly customer was sent packing by the security.”
  • In a discussion about a failed relationship, someone might say, “After finding out about the betrayal, I sent my partner packing.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “If you continue misbehaving, you’ll be sent packing to your room.”

14. Released

This term is used to describe someone being let go or freed from a situation or responsibility. It implies that the person is no longer bound or obligated to stay.

  • For instance, “The employee was released from their contract after completing all their tasks.”
  • In a conversation about a prisoner, someone might say, “After serving their sentence, the inmate was released from prison.”
  • A coach might announce, “The injured player has been cleared by the medical team and will be released to play in the next game.”

15. Shown the door

This phrase is used to describe someone being dismissed or kicked out of a place or situation. It implies that the person is being forcefully and unceremoniously removed.

  • For example, “After causing a disturbance at the party, the troublemaker was shown the door.”
  • In a discussion about an unruly customer, someone might say, “The belligerent patron was shown the door by the bouncer.”
  • A landlord might warn their tenant, “If you don’t pay the rent on time, you’ll be shown the door.”

16. Axe

This slang term for dismiss or fire is derived from the phrase “getting the axe,” which refers to being cut or removed from a job or position. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “John got axed from his job after repeatedly showing up late.”
  • In a conversation about layoffs, someone might say, “They axed half of the department to cut costs.”
  • A manager might inform an employee, “I’m sorry, but we have to axe you due to the company’s restructuring.”

17. Can

To “can” someone means to dismiss or fire them. The term is derived from the idea of throwing someone into a trash can or garbage bin, symbolizing their removal from the workplace.

  • For instance, “The boss decided to can the employee for consistently underperforming.”
  • In a discussion about layoffs, someone might say, “Many employees were canned as a result of the company’s financial difficulties.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you hear that they canned Sarah? She was always causing trouble.”

18. Boot

This slang term means to dismiss or fire someone. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context, indicating the abrupt removal of an individual from a job or position.

  • For example, “The manager gave him the boot for stealing from the company.”
  • In a conversation about a coworker’s departure, someone might say, “I heard they gave her the boot because of her constant tardiness.”
  • A supervisor might inform an employee, “I’m sorry, but we have to give you the boot due to budget cuts.”

19. Sack

To “sack” someone means to dismiss or fire them. The term “pink slip” is often used interchangeably with “sack” and refers to the notice of termination given to an employee. It is commonly used in a professional or formal context.

  • For instance, “The company decided to sack several employees due to the economic downturn.”
  • In a discussion about layoffs, someone might say, “Many workers received pink slips as a result of the company’s restructuring.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Did you hear that John got the sack? He was always slacking off.”

20. Pink slip

A “pink slip” is a slang term for a notice of termination or dismissal given to an employee. It is often used in a professional or formal context, indicating the end of employment.

  • For example, “After years of working for the company, she received a pink slip out of the blue.”
  • In a conversation about job security, someone might say, “I’m worried about getting a pink slip if the company doesn’t meet its financial targets.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Have you ever received a pink slip? How did you handle it?”

21. Downsize

To reduce the number of employees in a company or organization. “Downsize” is often used to refer to the act of dismissing a significant number of employees as a cost-cutting measure.

  • For instance, a news article might report, “The company plans to downsize its workforce by 20%.”
  • In a conversation about job security, someone might say, “I’m worried that the company might downsize soon.”
  • A manager might discuss the need to downsize with their team, saying, “Unfortunately, we have to downsize some departments due to budget constraints.”

22. Brush off

To disregard or dismiss someone or something in a casual or nonchalant manner. When someone is “brushed off,” their input or presence is not taken seriously or given much consideration.

  • For example, if someone suggests an idea in a meeting and it is quickly dismissed, they might feel brushed off.
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might complain, “I called for help, but they just brushed me off.”
  • A person might say, “I tried to talk to them about my concerns, but they brushed me off like it was no big deal.”

23. Blow off

To cancel or dismiss a planned event or meeting, often without providing a valid reason or explanation. When something is “blown off,” it is disregarded or considered unimportant.

  • For instance, if someone cancels a date at the last minute without a good reason, they might be accused of blowing the other person off.
  • In a conversation about social commitments, someone might say, “I blew off the party because I wasn’t in the mood.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe they blew off our important meeting without any notice.”

24. Send packing

To dismiss or fire someone, often abruptly or without warning. “Send packing” implies that the person is being sent away or removed from their current position or situation.

  • For example, if an employee consistently underperforms, they might be sent packing by their employer.
  • In a conversation about a difficult coworker, someone might say, “I wish the boss would send them packing.”
  • A manager might discuss a decision to send an employee packing, saying, “We had to let them go due to repeated policy violations.”

25. Drop

To dismiss or terminate someone’s employment or involvement in a particular situation or project. “Drop” is often used informally to refer to the act of letting someone go or ending their participation.

  • For instance, if someone is no longer needed on a team, they might be dropped from the project.
  • In a conversation about a recent breakup, someone might say, “They dropped me out of nowhere.”
  • A supervisor might discuss the need to drop an employee, saying, “Their performance has been consistently poor, so we have to drop them from the team.”

26. Ditch

To leave or abandon someone or something in a careless or abrupt manner.

  • For example, “He ditched his friends at the party and went home early.”
  • A student might say, “I’m going to ditch class tomorrow and go to the beach instead.”
  • Someone might complain, “My date ditched me at the restaurant and never showed up.”

27. Dump

To end a romantic relationship with someone.

  • For instance, “She dumped her boyfriend after finding out he cheated.”
  • A person might say, “I need to dump my toxic partner and find someone better.”
  • A friend might console, “I’m sorry to hear that your girlfriend dumped you.”

28. Nix

To reject or cancel something.

  • For example, “The boss nixed our proposal to have a company retreat.”
  • A person might say, “I asked my parents if I could go to the party, but they nixed the idea.”
  • A team member might suggest, “Let’s nix that plan and come up with a better one.”

29. Pass over

To ignore or disregard someone or something.

  • For instance, “The manager passed over several qualified candidates for the promotion.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like my contributions are always passed over in team meetings.”
  • A colleague might complain, “Why did the boss pass me over for the important project?”

30. Shove off

To tell someone to leave or go away in a rude or dismissive manner.

  • For example, “He told his annoying neighbor to shove off and leave him alone.”
  • A person might say, “I’m tired of your attitude. Shove off!”
  • Someone might respond, “If you don’t like it here, why don’t you just shove off?”

31. Turn down

To refuse or decline something or someone.

  • For example, “I turned down the job offer because the salary was too low.”
  • A person might say, “She turned him down when he asked her out on a date.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might turn down a proposal by saying, “I’m sorry, but we can’t accept those terms.”

32. Wave off

To signal or indicate that something or someone should be ignored or disregarded.

  • For instance, “She waved off their concerns and continued with her plan.”
  • A person might wave off a suggestion by saying, “Nah, let’s not do that.”
  • In a meeting, someone might wave off a comment by saying, “That’s not relevant to our discussion.”

33. Give the heave-ho

To dismiss or remove someone from a job or position.

  • For example, “The CEO gave the underperforming employee the heave-ho.”
  • A manager might say, “If you don’t improve your performance, I’ll have to give you the heave-ho.”
  • In a sports team, a coach might give a player the heave-ho for disciplinary reasons.
See also  Top 53 Slang For If – Meaning & Usage

34. Give the cold shoulder

To intentionally show indifference or disregard towards someone.

  • For instance, “She gave her ex-boyfriend the cold shoulder after their breakup.”
  • A person might give the cold shoulder to a colleague they don’t get along with by avoiding any interaction.
  • In a social setting, someone might give the cold shoulder to a person they don’t like by refusing to acknowledge their presence.

35. Give the thumbs down

To express disapproval or rejection of something or someone.

  • For example, “The audience gave the performance the thumbs down.”
  • A person might give the thumbs down to a movie by saying, “I didn’t enjoy it at all.”
  • In a voting process, someone might give the thumbs down to a proposal by voting against it.

36. Give the brush

To intentionally ignore or reject someone or something. This phrase can be used to dismiss someone or their ideas.

  • For example, “He asked her out, but she gave him the brush.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s give the brush to that proposal and move on to the next item.”
  • A person might say, “I gave the brush to his rude comment and didn’t let it bother me.”

37. Give the runaround

To avoid answering or providing a clear response to someone. This phrase is often used when someone is trying to dismiss or evade a question or request.

  • For instance, “I asked for a refund, but they just gave me the runaround.”
  • In a customer service situation, a representative might say, “I’m sorry, but I can’t help you with that. Let me transfer you to someone else.”
  • A person might complain, “They keep giving me the runaround instead of addressing my concerns.”

38. Give the go-by

To ignore or disregard someone or something. This phrase implies intentionally dismissing or neglecting someone or their ideas.

  • For example, “He gave the go-by to her suggestion and went with his own.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “Let’s not give the go-by to any team member’s input.”
  • A person might comment, “It’s frustrating when others give the go-by to my opinions.”

39. Give the air

To dismiss or reject someone or something. This phrase implies not giving attention or consideration to someone or their ideas.

  • For instance, “He gave her the air when she tried to talk to him.”
  • In a job interview, an employer might say, “We gave the air to his application because he lacked the necessary experience.”
  • A person might say, “I gave the air to their negative comments and focused on the positive feedback.”

40. Give the gate

To dismiss or reject someone or something. This phrase suggests not allowing someone or their ideas to be part of a particular situation or group.

  • For example, “They gave him the gate and didn’t invite him to the party.”
  • In a team project, someone might say, “Let’s not give the gate to any team member’s contributions.”
  • A person might comment, “I felt hurt when they gave me the gate and excluded me from the conversation.”

41. Give the bounce

To terminate someone’s employment or dismiss them from a job. “Give the bounce” is a slang term used to describe the act of firing someone, often abruptly or without warning.

  • For example, a boss might say, “I had to give him the bounce after he repeatedly showed up late.”
  • In a conversation about layoffs, someone might mention, “The company had to give several employees the bounce due to budget cuts.”
  • A disgruntled employee might vent, “I can’t believe they gave me the bounce after all my hard work.”

42. Give the old heave-ho

To dismiss or fire someone from a job or position. “Give the old heave-ho” is a slang phrase used to describe the act of letting someone go or terminating their employment.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “I had to give him the old heave-ho because of his consistent poor performance.”
  • In a discussion about downsizing, someone might comment, “The company had to give a lot of employees the old heave-ho to stay afloat.”
  • An employee who was let go might say, “I can’t believe they gave me the old heave-ho just because of one mistake.”