Top 54 Slang For Disregard – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing disregard in conversations, sometimes words just don’t cut it. That’s why we’ve put together a list of the most trendy and effective slang terms to help you convey that “I couldn’t care less” attitude in style. Stay ahead of the curve with our compilation of the top slang for disregard that will have you shrugging off negativity like a pro.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Ignore

To intentionally not acknowledge or give attention to someone or something.

  • For example, if someone is talking to you but you don’t want to listen, you might say, “I’m just going to ignore them.”
  • If someone sends you a message that you don’t want to respond to, you might choose to ignore it.
  • In a group discussion, if someone suggests an idea but it is disregarded, they might feel ignored.

2. Brush off

To quickly and casually dismiss or disregard someone or something.

  • For instance, if someone tries to start an argument with you but you don’t want to engage, you might say, “I’m just going to brush them off.”
  • If someone gives you a compliment that you don’t believe or appreciate, you might brush it off.
  • When faced with criticism, some people choose to brush it off rather than take it to heart.

3. Dismiss

To reject or disregard someone or something as unimportant or unworthy of consideration.

  • For example, if someone presents an idea that is not well-received, it may be dismissed by others.
  • In a court of law, a judge may dismiss a case if there is not enough evidence.
  • If someone tries to start an argument but you don’t want to engage, you might dismiss their comments.

4. Blow off

To intentionally ignore or reject someone or something, often in a disrespectful or dismissive manner.

  • For instance, if someone invites you to a party but you have no interest in attending, you might blow them off.
  • If someone is trying to get your attention but you don’t want to acknowledge them, you might blow them off.
  • When someone doesn’t show up for a scheduled meeting without giving a reason, they are said to have blown it off.

5. Shrug off

To minimize or disregard the importance or impact of someone or something.

  • For example, if someone criticizes you but you don’t let it affect you, you might shrug it off.
  • If someone tries to make you feel guilty for something, but you don’t feel responsible, you might shrug it off.
  • When faced with a difficult situation, some people choose to shrug it off and not let it bother them.

6. Tune out

This term refers to intentionally ignoring or disconnecting from a person, conversation, or situation.

  • For example, “I had to tune out my coworker’s constant complaining.”
  • A student might say, “I tend to tune out during boring lectures.”
  • Someone might advise, “If you want to reduce stress, try tuning out negative news for a while.”

7. Disregard

To disregard means to intentionally not pay attention to or ignore something or someone.

  • For instance, “He told me to disregard his previous email.”
  • In a warning message, you might see, “Do not disregard this important information.”
  • A parent might say, “Don’t disregard your responsibilities; they won’t go away.”

8. Neglect

Neglect means to fail to give proper care or attention to something or someone.

  • For example, “The landlord neglected to fix the leaking faucet.”
  • In a discussion about self-care, someone might mention, “It’s important not to neglect your mental health.”
  • A teacher might say, “Don’t neglect your studies if you want to pass the exam.”

9. Overlook

To overlook means to fail to notice or consider something, often unintentionally.

  • For instance, “She overlooked the spelling mistake in her email.”
  • In a conversation about a crime scene, a detective might say, “We must be careful not to overlook any potential evidence.”
  • A manager might remind their team, “Let’s not overlook the importance of attention to detail.”

10. Pass over

To pass over means to intentionally disregard or ignore something without giving it much attention.

  • For example, “He decided to pass over the irrelevant details.”
  • In a discussion about job applications, someone might say, “Recruiters often pass over resumes with spelling errors.”
  • A person might advise, “When faced with negativity, it’s best to pass it over and focus on the positive.”

11. Pay no mind

This phrase means to intentionally not pay attention to something or someone. It implies that the person is choosing to disregard or not give importance to the matter at hand.

  • For example, “You can pay no mind to those rumors. They’re not true.”
  • If someone is constantly bothering you, you might say, “Just pay no mind to them and they’ll eventually stop.”
  • In a conversation about distractions, you might say, “I try to pay no mind to my phone when I’m working.”

12. Turn a blind eye

This phrase means to intentionally ignore or pretend not to see something, usually because it is inconvenient or uncomfortable to acknowledge it.

  • For instance, “The teacher decided to turn a blind eye to the students cheating on the test.”
  • In a discussion about corruption, someone might say, “Many people in power choose to turn a blind eye to unethical practices.”
  • If someone is gossiping about a friend, you might advise, “Just turn a blind eye and don’t get involved.”

13. Give the cold shoulder

This phrase means to intentionally ignore or treat someone with indifference or aloofness. It implies a deliberate act of disregarding someone’s presence or attempts at communication.

  • For example, “After the argument, she gave him the cold shoulder and didn’t speak to him for days.”
  • If someone is being rude to you, you might say, “I’m just going to give them the cold shoulder and not engage.”
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, someone might mention, “Giving the cold shoulder is a passive-aggressive way of showing disapproval.”

14. Blow someone off

This phrase means to intentionally dismiss or ignore someone, often in a rude or disrespectful manner. It implies a lack of consideration or regard for the person’s feelings or opinions.

  • For instance, “He invited her to the party, but she blew him off and didn’t show up.”
  • If someone cancels plans last minute, you might say, “They totally blew me off and didn’t even apologize.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might mention, “I don’t want to waste my time with someone who constantly blows me off.”

15. Shut out

This phrase means to intentionally exclude or ignore someone, often in a way that makes them feel left out or disregarded. It implies a deliberate act of keeping someone out of a group or situation.

  • For example, “They shut her out of the project and didn’t involve her in any decisions.”
  • If someone is being ignored by their friends, they might say, “I feel like they’re shutting me out and it hurts.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “It’s important not to shut anyone out and to value everyone’s input.”

16. Shove off

This phrase is used to tell someone to leave or go away, often in a rude or dismissive manner.

  • For example, if someone is bothering you, you might say, “Shove off, I’m not interested.”
  • If someone is lingering and you want them to leave, you could say, “Why don’t you just shove off?”
  • In a confrontational situation, one person might say to another, “If you don’t want trouble, you better shove off.”

17. Give the brush-off

To give someone the brush-off means to ignore or reject them, often in a dismissive or rude way.

  • For instance, if someone is hitting on you and you’re not interested, you might give them the brush-off by saying, “Sorry, not interested.”
  • If someone is trying to sell you something you don’t want, you could give them the brush-off by saying, “No thanks, I’m not interested.”
  • In a social setting, if someone is being rude or annoying, you might give them the brush-off by simply walking away.
See also  Top 30 Slang For Ostentatious – Meaning & Usage

18. Look the other way

To look the other way means to purposely ignore or pretend not to notice something, often to avoid getting involved or taking action.

  • For example, if you see someone breaking a rule but choose not to report it, you are looking the other way.
  • In a situation where someone is being mistreated, if you choose not to intervene or speak up, you are looking the other way.
  • In a conversation where someone makes an inappropriate comment, if you choose to ignore it, you are looking the other way.

19. Dismiss out of hand

To dismiss something out of hand means to immediately reject or disregard it without giving it any consideration or thought.

  • For instance, if someone presents an idea and you immediately say, “That will never work,” you are dismissing it out of hand.
  • In a meeting where someone suggests a new approach and you immediately shoot it down without further discussion, you are dismissing it out of hand.
  • In a debate where someone presents an argument and you immediately dismiss it as invalid, you are dismissing it out of hand.

20. Snub

To snub someone means to deliberately ignore or reject them, often as a form of disrespect or to show disapproval.

  • For example, if someone tries to say hello to you but you intentionally turn away and ignore them, you are snubbing them.
  • In a social setting, if someone is being rude or offensive and you choose not to engage with them, you are snubbing them.
  • In a professional setting, if someone makes a suggestion and you dismiss it without acknowledging them, you are snubbing them.

21. Let slide

To choose not to address or deal with a certain situation or issue.

  • For example, “I’m going to let this minor mistake slide and focus on the bigger issues.”
  • A supervisor might say, “I’ll let it slide this time, but make sure it doesn’t happen again.”
  • Someone might comment, “He always lets things slide and avoids confrontation.”

22. Put on the back burner

To prioritize or focus on other tasks or responsibilities, resulting in the delay or postponement of a particular matter.

  • For instance, “I’ll have to put this project on the back burner until I finish the urgent tasks.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve put my personal goals on the back burner while I focus on my career.”
  • In a conversation about priorities, someone might mention, “Sometimes we have to put certain things on the back burner to address more pressing matters.”

23. Put out of mind

To intentionally forget or disregard something, usually to avoid thinking about it or to move on from it.

  • For example, “I need to put this painful memory out of my mind and focus on the present.”
  • A person might say, “I try to put negative thoughts out of my mind and focus on the positive.”
  • In a discussion about past failures, someone might mention, “It’s important to put past mistakes out of mind and focus on future opportunities.”

24. Turn away

To deliberately ignore or reject something, often out of disinterest or disagreement.

  • For instance, “He turned away from the offer because it didn’t align with his values.”
  • A person might say, “I had to turn away from that toxic relationship for my own well-being.”
  • In a conversation about different opinions, someone might comment, “Some people turn away from opposing viewpoints instead of engaging in meaningful discussion.”

25. Look through

To intentionally disregard or not pay attention to something, often due to indifference or lack of interest.

  • For example, “She looked through the list of job vacancies without finding anything suitable.”
  • A person might say, “I usually look through the advertisements in the newspaper without paying much attention.”
  • In a discussion about distractions, someone might mention, “I try to look through unnecessary notifications and focus on what’s important.”

26. Pass by

To not pay attention to or acknowledge something or someone.

  • For example, “I decided to pass by his rude comment and not let it bother me.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let’s pass by that issue for now and focus on finding a solution.”
  • If someone offers unsolicited advice, you might respond with, “Thanks, but I’m going to pass by that suggestion.”

27. Pay no heed

To intentionally choose not to listen or give attention to something or someone.

  • For instance, “He told me to stop worrying, but I paid no heed to his words.”
  • When someone tries to distract you from your goal, you might say, “I’ll pay no heed to their attempts to derail me.”
  • If someone tries to gossip about a mutual friend, you might say, “I prefer to pay no heed to rumors and focus on what I know to be true.”

28. Disdain

To have a strong feeling of dislike or contempt towards someone or something.

  • For example, “She showed disdain for his taste in music by rolling her eyes.”
  • When someone makes a disrespectful comment, you might respond with, “I disdain their ignorance and refuse to engage.”
  • If someone dismisses a person’s achievements, you might say, “It’s unfair to disdain their hard work and talent.”

29. Brush away

To dismiss or disregard something as unimportant or insignificant.

  • For instance, “He brushed away my concerns and said I was overreacting.”
  • When someone tries to bring up a past mistake, you might say, “Let’s brush away the past and focus on moving forward.”
  • If someone criticizes your choices, you might respond with, “I’ll brush away their judgment and trust my own instincts.”

30. Cast aside

To deliberately ignore or reject someone or something, often without giving it proper consideration.

  • For example, “She cast aside his opinion and refused to listen to his perspective.”
  • When someone tries to bring up a past argument, you might say, “Let’s cast aside old grievances and start fresh.”
  • If someone dismisses your feelings, you might say, “It’s hurtful to be cast aside and not taken seriously.”

31. Turn down

This slang phrase is often used to describe the act of declining or saying no to an offer or request.

  • For example, “I had to turn down the job offer because it didn’t align with my career goals.”
  • A person might say, “She turned down his invitation to the party.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might mention, “He turned down her advances because he wasn’t interested.”

32. Discredit

When someone discredits someone or something, they are casting doubt or skepticism on their credibility or reputation.

  • For instance, “The journalist worked hard to discredit the false claims made by the politician.”
  • A person might say, “He tried to discredit his opponent by spreading rumors.”
  • In a discussion about scientific studies, someone might argue, “The small sample size discredits the validity of the results.”

33. Send to Coventry

This slang phrase is used to describe the act of intentionally ignoring or excluding someone, often as a form of punishment or social isolation.

  • For example, “After the argument, the group decided to send him to Coventry and not include him in any activities.”
  • A person might say, “She was sent to Coventry after betraying her friends.”
  • In a conversation about workplace dynamics, someone might mention, “The team decided to send the difficult coworker to Coventry to avoid conflict.”

34. Give the slip

When someone gives the slip, they manage to escape or evade someone or something that is trying to catch or find them.

  • For instance, “The suspect gave the slip to the police by blending into a crowd.”
  • A person might say, “I tried to catch the cat, but it gave me the slip and disappeared.”
  • In a discussion about spy movies, someone might mention, “The spy gave the slip to the enemy agents and made a daring escape.”

35. Put off

To put off means to postpone or delay something to a later time or date.

  • For example, “We had to put off the meeting until next week due to scheduling conflicts.”
  • A person might say, “I keep putting off cleaning my room because I don’t feel like it.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might mention, “They had to put off their vacation due to unexpected circumstances.”

36. Turn back

To refuse to acknowledge or pay attention to something. It implies a deliberate choice to disregard or overlook.

  • For example, if someone suggests a course of action that is deemed unwise, another person might say, “Let’s turn back on that idea.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might say, “I prefer to turn back and focus on more positive aspects.”
  • A supervisor might advise an employee, “You should turn back on that project and prioritize other tasks instead.”

37. Pass up

To decline or reject an opportunity or offer. It suggests choosing not to take advantage of something that could be beneficial.

  • For instance, if someone is offered a promotion but decides not to take it, they might say, “I’m going to pass up on that opportunity.”
  • In a discussion about travel plans, someone might say, “I regret passing up on the chance to visit that country.”
  • A person might reflect, “Looking back, I realize passing up on that job offer was a mistake.”

38. Put to one side

To intentionally set something aside or disregard it temporarily. It implies not giving proper attention or consideration to something.

  • For example, if someone brings up a controversial topic during a meeting, a moderator might say, “Let’s put that to one side for now.”
  • In a conversation about priorities, someone might say, “I have to put personal matters to one side and focus on work.”
  • A person might advise a friend, “You should put those negative thoughts to one side and focus on the positive aspects of your life.”

39. Put down

To criticize or speak negatively about someone or something. It suggests undermining or devaluing the importance or worth of the subject.

  • For instance, if someone shares an idea and it is immediately criticized, they might feel put down.
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Constantly putting your partner down is a sign of emotional abuse.”
  • A person might reflect, “Growing up, I often felt put down by my parents, which affected my self-esteem.”

40. Look past

To consciously choose to overlook or not pay attention to something. It implies intentionally disregarding or not acknowledging something.

  • For example, if someone makes a mistake but it is not seen as significant, others might look past it.
  • In a conversation about flaws, someone might say, “I try to look past imperfections and focus on the person’s character.”
  • A person might reflect, “It took me a while to realize that I was looking past the signs of a toxic relationship.”

41. Leave be

This phrase means to leave something or someone alone and not get involved or take action. It implies a sense of disregard or indifference.

  • For example, if someone is trying to fix a broken toy, you might say, “Just leave it be. It’s not worth the trouble.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, one person might say, “Let’s leave politics be for now.”
  • If someone is upset and wants to be alone, you might say, “I’ll leave you be. Take your time.”

42. Turn off

To “turn off” something means to disengage from it or lose interest in it. It implies a sense of disregard or lack of concern.

  • For instance, if someone is talking about a boring topic, you might say, “Sorry, but that conversation really turned me off.”
  • In a discussion about a TV show, someone might say, “The excessive violence in that show really turns me off.”
  • If someone is consistently rude, you might say, “Their behavior is a major turn off.”

43. Brush over

To “brush over” something means to dismiss or overlook it without giving it much attention or consideration. It implies a sense of disregard or indifference.

  • For example, during a meeting, a manager might brush over a minor issue and say, “Let’s focus on the main topic.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial statement, someone might brush over the offensive comment and say, “Let’s not dwell on that.”
  • If someone brings up a past mistake, you might brush it over and say, “That was a long time ago. Let’s move on.”

44. Set aside

To “set aside” something means to disregard or put it aside without giving it much attention or consideration. It implies a sense of disregard or indifference.

  • For instance, if someone suggests an impractical idea, you might say, “Let’s set that aside for now and focus on more feasible options.”
  • In a discussion about personal preferences, someone might set aside their own opinion and say, “Let’s set our differences aside and find a compromise.”
  • If someone brings up a past disagreement, you might say, “Let’s set that aside and start fresh.”

45. Turn a blind ear

To “turn a blind ear” means to ignore or not listen to something intentionally. It implies a deliberate disregard or indifference.

  • For example, if someone is gossiping about others, you might say, “I prefer to turn a blind ear to rumors.”
  • In a conversation about negative feedback, someone might say, “I try to turn a blind ear to criticism and focus on my own growth.”
  • If someone is complaining about a minor inconvenience, you might say, “Don’t let it bother you. Just turn a blind ear.”

46. Pass on

This phrase means to dismiss or refuse something. It can also mean to ignore or not pay attention to someone or something.

  • For example, if someone offers you a second slice of cake but you’re full, you might say, “I’ll pass on that.”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, someone might say, “I think I’ll pass on seeing that one.”
  • If someone suggests going to a party but you’re not interested, you could respond with, “I’ll pass on that, thanks.”

47. Cold-shoulder

To give someone the cold shoulder means to deliberately ignore or snub them, often as a form of punishment or disapproval.

  • For instance, if someone tries to start a conversation with you but you’re upset with them, you might give them the cold shoulder by ignoring their presence.
  • In a group setting, if someone is being excluded or left out intentionally, they might say, “I’m getting the cold shoulder from everyone.”
  • If someone asks for help but you refuse to assist them because you’re upset, you could say, “I’m giving you the cold shoulder right now.”

48. Pooh-pooh

To pooh-pooh something means to disregard or dismiss it as unimportant or unworthy of consideration.

  • For example, if someone suggests an idea but you don’t think it’s worthwhile, you might pooh-pooh it by saying, “That’ll never work.”
  • In a discussion about a new trend, someone might pooh-pooh it by saying, “That’s just a passing fad.”
  • If someone is excited about a new restaurant but you don’t think highly of it, you could pooh-pooh it by saying, “It’s not as great as people make it out to be.”

49. Snuff

To snuff something means to ignore or extinguish it, often abruptly or forcefully.

  • For instance, if someone is trying to talk to you but you don’t want to listen, you might snuff them by saying, “I’m not interested.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial topic, someone might snuff out an opposing viewpoint by saying, “That’s a ridiculous argument.”
  • If someone is trying to get your attention but you’re focused on something else, you could snuff them by saying, “Sorry, I didn’t hear you.”

50. Refuse

To refuse something means to decline or reject it, often because you don’t want it or don’t agree with it.

  • For example, if someone offers you a piece of candy but you’re on a diet, you might refuse it by saying, “No, thank you.”
  • In a discussion about a new policy, someone might refuse to support it by saying, “I can’t agree with that.”
  • If someone asks you to do something that goes against your principles, you could refuse by saying, “I’m sorry, but I can’t do that.”

51. Naysay

This term refers to the act of rejecting or opposing something, often without providing a valid reason or explanation.

  • For example, “Don’t naysay my ideas without even considering them.”
  • In a debate, a person might say, “He’s just naysaying everything I say.”
  • Someone might express frustration by saying, “I can’t stand people who constantly naysay everything.”

52. Give someone the brush-off

This phrase means to intentionally dismiss or ignore someone, often in a rude or abrupt manner.

  • For instance, “She gave him the brush-off when he tried to ask her out.”
  • In a social setting, a person might say, “I tried to strike up a conversation with her, but she totally gave me the brush-off.”
  • Someone might describe a disappointing interaction by saying, “I reached out for help, but I just got the brush-off.”

53. Sidestep

This term means to avoid or bypass something, often by taking a different direction or approach.

  • For example, “He sidestepped the question and changed the topic.”
  • In a discussion about responsibility, a person might say, “Don’t try to sidestep your obligations.”
  • Someone might describe a clever maneuver by saying, “He managed to sidestep the issue and shift the blame onto someone else.”

54. Put aside

This phrase means to intentionally disregard or ignore something, often temporarily.

  • For instance, “Let’s put aside our differences and focus on finding a solution.”
  • In a heated argument, a person might say, “We need to put our egos aside and work together.”
  • Someone might express frustration by saying, “He’s always putting my feelings aside and only thinking about himself.”