Top 29 Slang For Distance – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing distance in a cool and trendy way, slang for distance has got you covered. From “as the crow flies” to “a stone’s throw away,” our team has rounded up the most hip and happening phrases that will have you talking about distance like a pro. Say goodbye to boring measurements and hello to a whole new world of expressive ways to talk about how far things are. Get ready to up your distance game with our listicle!

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1. Clicks

This slang term is derived from military jargon, where “clicks” is a shortened version of “kilometers.” It is used to refer to a distance of one kilometer.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “We hiked for several clicks before reaching our destination.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “I walked a few clicks to get to the nearest grocery store.”
  • A hiker might describe their journey by saying, “I hiked 10 clicks along the trail before setting up camp.”

2. Blocks

In urban settings, a “block” refers to a short distance typically measured in city blocks. The length of a block can vary depending on the city.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The coffee shop is just a few blocks away from here.”
  • In a conversation about navigation, one might ask, “How many blocks do I need to walk to get to the subway station?”
  • A local resident might give directions by saying, “Go straight for four blocks and then turn left.”

3. Klicks

Similar to “clicks,” “klicks” is another term derived from military jargon. It is also used to refer to a distance of one kilometer.

  • For example, a soldier might report, “We traveled 5 klicks to reach the enemy’s position.”
  • In a discussion about hiking, someone might mention, “I hiked 8 klicks to reach the summit of the mountain.”
  • A runner might say, “I ran a few klicks before I started feeling tired.”

4. Meters

While not necessarily slang, “meters” is a commonly used metric unit of distance. It is equivalent to approximately 3.28 feet.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The store is just a few meters away from here.”
  • In a conversation about construction, one might discuss, “The length of the bridge is 100 meters.”
  • A scientist might measure the distance between two points using meters and say, “The distance is 50 meters.”

5. Miles

While not specific to slang, “miles” is a commonly used unit of distance in the Imperial system. It is equivalent to approximately 1.6 kilometers.

  • For example, someone might say, “The beach is a few miles away from here.”
  • In a conversation about road trips, one might discuss, “We drove 500 miles to reach our destination.”
  • A runner might talk about their training and say, “I ran 10 miles today as part of my marathon preparation.”

6. K

In slang, “K” is short for “kilometer,” which is a unit of measurement equal to 1,000 meters. It is often used to refer to a long distance.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have to walk 5K to get to the store.”
  • In a conversation about running, a person might say, “I ran a 10K race last weekend.”
  • A traveler might complain, “The airport is 50K away from the city center.”

7. Lightyears

In slang, “lightyears” is used to describe a very long distance. However, in scientific terms, a lightyear is the distance that light travels in one year, which is approximately 5.88 trillion miles.

  • For instance, someone might say, “That party was lightyears away from my house.”
  • In a discussion about technology, a person might say, “The new smartphone is lightyears ahead of the previous model.”
  • A student might complain, “The library feels lightyears away from my dorm.”

8. Stone’s throw

“Stone’s throw” is a phrase used to describe a short distance. It refers to the distance that someone can throw a stone.

  • For example, someone might say, “The grocery store is just a stone’s throw from my house.”
  • In a conversation about travel, a person might say, “The beach is a stone’s throw away from the hotel.”
  • A real estate agent might advertise, “This apartment is a stone’s throw from downtown.”

9. Football field

In slang, “football field” is often used to describe a distance of approximately 100 yards, which is the length of a standard American football field.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The store is just a few football fields away.”
  • In a discussion about running, a person might say, “I can run a mile in about four football fields.”
  • A parent might say, “The park is two football fields away from our house.”

10. Arm’s length

In slang, “arm’s length” is used to refer to a distance that is close but still keeps someone or something at a safe or comfortable distance.

  • For example, someone might say, “I keep my ex-boyfriend at arm’s length to avoid drama.”
  • In a conversation about personal space, a person might say, “I like to keep strangers at arm’s length.”
  • A teacher might advise students, “Keep your classmates at arm’s length during exams.”

11. Spitting distance

This phrase is used to describe a distance that is extremely close or within a short walking distance.

  • For example, “The grocery store is just a spitting distance from my house.”
  • When talking about a nearby restaurant, someone might say, “It’s within spitting distance, we can walk there.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can see the concert venue from my house, it’s practically spitting distance!”

12. Stone’s throw away

This phrase is used to describe a distance that is not far, typically within walking distance.

  • For instance, “The beach is just a stone’s throw away, we can walk there.”
  • When discussing the location of a park, someone might say, “It’s a stone’s throw away from our neighborhood.”
  • A person might suggest, “Let’s go grab lunch, there’s a great restaurant just a stone’s throw away.”

13. Stone’s throw from

This phrase is used to describe a location that is very close to another location.

  • For example, “The hotel is just a stone’s throw from the airport.”
  • When discussing the proximity of a shopping mall, someone might say, “It’s just a stone’s throw from the city center.”
  • A person might mention, “The office building is a stone’s throw from the train station, making it convenient for commuters.”

14. Hiking distance

This phrase is used to describe a distance that is suitable for hiking, typically a moderate distance that can be covered on foot.

  • For instance, “The waterfall is within hiking distance, let’s go on a hike to see it.”
  • When discussing the length of a trail, someone might say, “It’s a 5-mile hiking distance to the summit.”
  • A person might ask, “Is the campsite within hiking distance from the parking lot?”

15. Cross-country

This term is used to describe a journey or race that spans a large distance, typically involving travel across a country or region.

  • For example, “He embarked on a cross-country road trip to explore the United States.”
  • When discussing a long-distance race, someone might say, “She trained for months to compete in a cross-country marathon.”
  • A person might mention, “We took a cross-country flight to visit family on the other coast.”

16. Next door

This phrase is used to describe something or someone that is very close or nearby. It suggests that the distance is so short that it’s like the next door.

  • For example, “I can walk to the grocery store. It’s right next door.”
  • A person might say, “My best friend lives next door, so we hang out all the time.”
  • In a conversation about convenience, someone might say, “Having a coffee shop next door is so convenient.”

17. Spittin’ distance

This expression is used to describe something or someone that is within a very short distance. It implies that the distance is so close that one could spit and reach it.

  • For instance, “The restaurant is just down the street. It’s spittin’ distance from here.”
  • A person might say, “I can throw a ball and hit my neighbor’s house. We’re spittin’ distance neighbors.”
  • In a discussion about convenience, someone might say, “Living within spittin’ distance of a grocery store is so convenient.”

18. Hop, skip, and a jump

This phrase is used to describe a distance that is relatively short. It suggests that the distance can be covered quickly, as if one were to hop, skip, and jump.

  • For example, “The park is just a hop, skip, and a jump away from my house.”
  • A person might say, “I can walk to work. It’s just a hop, skip, and a jump.”
  • In a conversation about convenience, someone might say, “Living within a hop, skip, and a jump of a gym is so convenient.”

19. Country mile

This expression is used to describe a distance that is very long or far. It implies that the distance is comparable to the vastness of the countryside.

  • For instance, “The nearest gas station is a country mile away.”
  • A person might say, “I have to drive a country mile to get to the nearest grocery store.”
  • In a discussion about inconvenience, someone might say, “Living a country mile away from the city can be challenging.”

20. Leagues

This term is used to describe a significant or great distance. It originates from the measurement of leagues, which is an old unit of distance.

  • For example, “The nearest town is leagues away from here.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I have to walk leagues to get to the bus stop.”
  • In a conversation about distance, someone might say, “The ocean stretches for leagues in every direction.”

21. Two shakes of a lamb’s tail

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or is completed quickly. It is often used to emphasize the speed or efficiency of an action.

  • For example, “I’ll be there in two shakes of a lamb’s tail!”
  • When discussing a task that was completed quickly, someone might say, “He finished that project in two shakes of a lamb’s tail.”
  • Another usage might be, “She whipped up dinner in two shakes of a lamb’s tail.”

22. Yards

Yards is a common unit of measurement used to describe distance. It is often used in sports, construction, and everyday conversation.

  • For instance, “The football field is 100 yards long.”
  • A person comparing two distances might say, “The grocery store is only a few yards away, while the mall is several miles.”
  • Another usage might be, “I need to mow the lawn, it’s grown a few yards since last week.”

23. Furlongs

Furlongs is an old-fashioned unit of measurement used to describe distance, particularly in horse racing. It is not commonly used in everyday conversation, but may be encountered in certain contexts.

  • For example, “The racehorse finished the course in just a few furlongs.”
  • A person discussing a long distance might say, “The marathon is 26.2 miles, which is 211 furlongs.”
  • Another usage might be, “The farm is located a few furlongs from the main road.”

24. Smidgen

Smidgen is a colloquial term used to describe a tiny or minuscule amount or distance. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For instance, “Can you add a smidgen of salt to the recipe?”
  • When discussing a small measurement, someone might say, “I only need a smidgen of sugar for my coffee.”
  • Another usage might be, “The park is just a smidgen away from here.”

25. Smidgeon

Smidgeon is an alternative spelling of smidgen and has the same meaning. It is also used to describe a small or insignificant amount or distance.

  • For example, “Could you spare a smidgeon of your time to help me with this?”
  • A person discussing a small measurement might say, “I only need a smidgeon of cream for my dessert.”
  • Another usage might be, “The store is just a smidgeon down the street.”

26. Smitch

This slang term is used to describe a very small measurement or distance. It is often used when referring to a tiny amount or a short distance.

  • For example, “I only need a smitch of sugar for my coffee.”
  • Someone might say, “He moved just a smitch closer to the finish line.”
  • In a conversation about cooking, a person might ask, “Can you add a smitch of salt to the recipe?”

27. Smidgin

Similar to “smitch,” this slang term refers to a small measurement or distance. It is often used interchangeably with “smitch” and carries the same meaning.

  • For instance, “I just need a smidgin of butter for this recipe.”
  • Someone might say, “She moved a smidgin closer to achieving her goal.”
  • In a discussion about measurements, a person might ask, “Can you add a smidgin of vanilla extract to the batter?”

28. Smidgit

This slang term is another variation of “smitch” and “smidgin.” It is used to describe a small measurement or distance, typically referring to something that is barely noticeable.

  • For example, “I just need a smidgit of space to fit this book on the shelf.”
  • Someone might say, “He moved a smidgit closer to the target.”
  • In a conversation about portion sizes, a person might say, “I’ll have just a smidgit of dessert, please.”

29. Smidglet

Similar to “smitch,” “smidgin,” and “smidgit,” this slang term is used to describe a small measurement or distance. It carries the same meaning as the other variations and is often used interchangeably.

  • For instance, “I only need a smidglet of paint to touch up the wall.”
  • Someone might say, “She moved a smidglet closer to the finish line.”
  • In a discussion about measurements, a person might ask, “Can you add a smidglet of pepper to the dish?”
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