Top 29 Slang For Distribution – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the world of distribution, staying up-to-date with the latest slang is essential. We’ve got you covered with a curated list of the top slang terms that are currently making waves in the distribution industry. From warehouses to supply chains, this listicle will have you speaking the language of distribution like a pro in no time. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your distribution game with our comprehensive guide!

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1. Spread the word

To spread information or news to others, usually through word of mouth or sharing on social media.

  • For example, “Spread the word about the upcoming event to all your friends!”
  • A person might say, “I heard there’s a great new restaurant in town. Let’s spread the word and get more people to try it.”
  • In a community group, someone might post, “Please spread the word about the charity drive happening next week.”

2. Pass around

To share or distribute something among a group of people.

  • For instance, “Pass around the snacks so everyone can have some.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might say, “Please pass around the handouts.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you pass around the sign-up sheet for the event?”

3. Circulate

To move or distribute something among a group of people, often in a continuous or repetitive manner.

  • For example, “Circulate the memo to all employees.”
  • In a meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s circulate the agenda so everyone knows what we’ll be discussing.”
  • A person might suggest, “We should circulate the petition to gather more signatures.”

4. Disperse

To scatter or distribute something over a wide area or among a group of people.

  • For instance, “The protesters were dispersed by the police.”
  • In a crowded room, someone might say, “Please disperse the flyers to ensure everyone gets one.”
  • A person might comment, “The seeds of this plant disperse through the wind.”

5. Hand out

To distribute or give something to others, often by physically handing it to them.

  • For example, “Hand out the brochures to everyone attending the event.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might say, “I’ll hand out the assignments at the end of the class.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you hand out the party invitations to our friends?”

6. Disseminate

To distribute or spread information, knowledge, or resources to a large number of people or places.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “It’s important to disseminate accurate information to your classmates.”
  • In a marketing campaign, a company might aim to “disseminate their message to a global audience.”
  • A news outlet might be praised for their ability to “disseminate breaking news quickly and efficiently.”

7. Allocate

To distribute or assign resources, such as money, time, or materials, for a specific purpose or to specific individuals or groups.

  • For instance, a manager might allocate funds for a project by saying, “We will allocate $10,000 to the marketing budget.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might allocate different tasks to students by saying, “I will allocate one person to research, one person to write, and one person to present.”
  • A government might allocate resources to support a particular sector, such as “We will allocate funds to improve infrastructure in rural areas.”

8. Deal out

To distribute or give out something, often in a deliberate or calculated manner.

  • For example, a card dealer might “deal out” playing cards to each player in a poker game.
  • In a group project, a team leader might “deal out” tasks to each team member, saying, “I will deal out the research tasks, and you can focus on the design.”
  • A teacher might “deal out” worksheets to students by saying,“deal out” worksheets to students by saying, “I will deal out one worksheet to each row.”

9. Pass out

To distribute or give out something, often by physically handing it to someone.

  • For instance, a teacher might “pass out” worksheets to students by walking around the classroom and giving each student a copy.
  • In a party, a host might “pass out” party favors to guests as they leave.
  • A volunteer might “pass out” food to the homeless by handing out meals from a food truck.
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10. Spread around

To distribute or share something among a group of people or places.

  • For example, a parent might “spread around” snacks among their children, saying, “Make sure to spread the snacks around so everyone gets some.”
  • In a charity event, volunteers might “spread around” donation boxes to collect funds from attendees.
  • A company might “spread around” job opportunities by posting them on various job boards and social media platforms.

11. Hand over

This phrase means to give something to someone, usually after they have requested it or it is expected of you. It can also imply a sense of authority or control in the act of giving.

  • For example, a parent might say, “Hand over your phone, it’s time for bed.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might demand, “Hand over the documents or the deal is off.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you hand over your assignment, please?”

12. Mete out

To mete out means to distribute or give out, usually in a measured or controlled manner. It suggests a sense of judgment or authority in the distribution process.

  • For instance, a judge might mete out punishment to a convicted criminal.
  • In a disciplinary situation, a teacher might mete out consequences to a misbehaving student.
  • A manager might mete out rewards or bonuses to deserving employees.

13. Portion out

To portion out means to divide something into parts or portions, usually for distribution or sharing. It implies a deliberate and systematic approach to dividing and allocating.

  • For example, a host might portion out slices of cake to guests at a party.
  • In a potluck dinner, participants might portion out their dishes to ensure everyone gets a fair share.
  • A chef might portion out ingredients for a recipe to ensure accurate measurements.

14. Parcel out

To parcel out means to distribute or allocate something, often in a careful or strategic manner. It suggests a deliberate and intentional approach to dividing and assigning.

  • For instance, a project manager might parcel out tasks to team members based on their skills and availability.
  • In a group project, a leader might parcel out responsibilities to ensure an even workload.
  • A teacher might parcel out resources to students to facilitate their learning.
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15. Dole out

To dole out means to distribute or give out something, often in a limited or controlled manner. It can imply a sense of authority or power in the act of giving.

  • For example, a charity might dole out food to those in need.
  • In a classroom, a teacher might dole out rewards or incentives to motivate students.
  • A supervisor might dole out assignments to employees based on their skills and workload.

16. Administer

To distribute or allocate something, often in an official or organized manner. “Administer” is a formal term used to describe the act of distributing something.

  • For example, a teacher might administer a test to their students.
  • In a healthcare setting, a doctor might administer medication to a patient.
  • A government agency might administer funds to various organizations.

17. Allot

To allocate or distribute something, usually in a fair or predetermined manner. “Allot” implies a deliberate and planned distribution of resources or items.

  • For instance, a supervisor might allot specific tasks to each team member.
  • In a budgeting context, a financial planner might allot a certain amount of money to different expense categories.
  • A teacher might allot a certain amount of time for each activity in their lesson plan.

18. Apportion

To distribute or allocate something, typically in a proportional or fair manner. “Apportion” often implies dividing resources or items based on a specific criteria or formula.

  • For example, a judge might apportion the assets of a divorced couple.
  • In a political context, representatives might apportion seats in a legislative body based on population.
  • A chef might apportion ingredients in a recipe to ensure the right balance of flavors.

19. Dispense

To distribute or provide something to others. “Dispense” implies the act of giving out or distributing something, often in a systematic or organized manner.

  • For instance, a pharmacist dispenses medication to patients.
  • In a retail setting, a cashier might dispense change to customers.
  • A vending machine dispenses snacks and drinks when money is inserted.

20. Give away

To distribute or provide something to others for free or without expecting anything in return. “Give away” implies a generous act of distributing something without any cost or obligation.

  • For example, a company might give away free samples of their product to promote it.
  • At a charity event, volunteers might give away food and clothing to those in need.
  • A friend might give away extra tickets to a concert to their friends.

21. Share out

This phrase means to divide or distribute something in a fair and equal manner among a group of people or recipients.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s share out the snacks so that everyone gets an equal portion.”
  • In a team project, a leader might instruct, “Make sure to share out the workload so that everyone has an equal contribution.”
  • A parent might say, “Let’s share out the chores so that everyone takes turns.”

22. Spread out

This slang phrase means to distribute or scatter something over a large area or among a group of people.

  • For instance, a party organizer might say, “Spread out the decorations to create a festive atmosphere.”
  • In a food drive, a volunteer might instruct, “Spread out the donated items on the table for easy access.”
  • A manager might say, “Let’s spread out the workload so that everyone has enough time to complete their tasks.”

23. Issue

In this context, “issue” means to distribute or provide something to a group of people or recipients.

  • For example, a company might issue new uniforms to its employees.
  • In a classroom, a teacher might issue textbooks to the students at the beginning of the semester.
  • A government agency might issue food stamps to eligible individuals.
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24. Deliver

This term means to transport or distribute something to a specific location or recipient.

  • For instance, a courier might deliver a package to a customer’s doorstep.
  • In a business setting, a salesperson might deliver products to various retail stores.
  • A food delivery service might deliver meals to customers’ homes.

25. Ship out

This phrase means to send or transport something, usually in large quantities, to a different location or recipient.

  • For example, a company might ship out a batch of products to its international distributors.
  • In a military context, soldiers might ship out to a different base or deployment location.
  • A manufacturer might ship out a shipment of goods to a retailer.

26. Retail

This term refers to the process of selling goods or products directly to the end consumer. It involves the sale of individual items or small quantities.

  • For instance, a store owner might say, “We specialize in retail sales of clothing and accessories.”
  • In a discussion about business models, someone might mention, “Retail is a competitive industry with constantly changing trends.”
  • A customer might ask, “Do you have this item available for retail purchase?”

27. Wholesale

Wholesale refers to the sale of goods or products in large quantities, typically to retailers or other businesses rather than to individual consumers.

  • For example, a supplier might say, “We offer wholesale prices for businesses looking to stock their inventory.”
  • In a conversation about buying in bulk, someone might mention, “Wholesale prices can be more cost-effective for businesses.”
  • A retailer might ask, “Do you offer any discounts for wholesale orders?”

28. Disburse

Disburse means to distribute or allocate funds or resources. It is often used in the context of financial transactions or the distribution of money.

  • For instance, a financial advisor might say, “We will disburse the funds into your designated account.”
  • In a discussion about charity donations, someone might mention, “The organization plans to disburse the funds to various local charities.”
  • A person might ask, “When will the company disburse the bonus payments?”

29. Serve up

Serve up is a slang term that means to provide or deliver something, usually in a prompt or efficient manner.

  • For example, a waiter might say, “Let me serve up your meal right away.”
  • In a conversation about customer service, someone might mention, “We strive to serve up exceptional experiences for our clients.”
  • A person might say, “I can serve up some fresh ideas for your project.”