Top 25 Slang For Divulge – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to sharing secrets or revealing information, sometimes the right slang can make all the difference. Curious about the latest slang for divulge? Look no further! Our team has put together a list of the most trendy and popular terms used to talk about spilling the beans. Get ready to up your slang game and impress your friends with this insider knowledge!

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1. Spill the beans

This phrase means to unintentionally or intentionally disclose information that was supposed to be kept secret or confidential.

  • For example, “I can’t believe you spilled the beans about the surprise party!”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “Don’t spill the beans about our plan to rob the bank.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “If you spill the beans about what happened last night, I’ll never trust you again.”

2. Let the cat out of the bag

This expression means to disclose information that was meant to be kept hidden or unknown, often leading to unwanted consequences.

  • For instance, “I accidentally let the cat out of the bag about the surprise vacation.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Don’t let the cat out of the bag about the upcoming layoffs.”
  • A friend might ask, “Who let the cat out of the bag about our surprise party?”

3. Dish

This term refers to sharing or revealing information or gossip, often in a casual or informal manner.

  • For example, “She dished all the juicy details about the celebrity scandal.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Okay, spill the dish. What happened last night?”
  • A journalist might write, “The tabloid magazine dished the latest rumors about the royal family.”

4. Let it slip

This phrase means to unintentionally reveal or disclose information that was meant to be kept secret or private.

  • For instance, “I let it slip that I was planning a surprise party for my sister.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Oops, I let it slip that I got a promotion.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Careful, don’t let it slip that we ate all the cookies.”

5. Give the game away

This expression means to reveal or expose information that was meant to be kept secret or hidden, often leading to the failure of a plan or surprise.

  • For example, “He gave the game away by accidentally mentioning the surprise ending of the movie.”
  • In a discussion, someone might say, “Don’t give the game away by revealing our strategy.”
  • A teammate might warn, “Keep your cool and don’t give the game away by showing your nervousness.”

6. Blab

To reveal a secret or confidential information, often unintentionally or without thinking. “Blab” is a colloquial term used to describe someone who can’t keep a secret.

  • For example, “She blabbed about the surprise party and ruined the surprise.”
  • In a conversation about gossip, someone might say, “Don’t blab this to anyone, but I heard a rumor about our boss.”
  • A friend might playfully tease, “You’re such a blabbermouth, I can’t trust you with any secrets!”

7. Leak

To release or make known confidential or secret information, often intentionally or as a deliberate act. “Leak” is a term commonly used in news or media to describe the unauthorized release of sensitive information.

  • For instance, “The whistleblower leaked classified documents to the press.”
  • In a discussion about government transparency, someone might say, “Leaks are essential for holding those in power accountable.”
  • A journalist might report, “The company’s upcoming product details were leaked online, generating buzz and speculation.”

8. Tell all

To disclose or reveal all the information or secrets about a particular situation or person. “Tell all” often implies sharing intimate or personal details.

  • For example, “The celebrity wrote a tell-all book about their life in the spotlight.”
  • In a conversation about a scandal, someone might say, “The witness finally decided to tell all and testify in court.”
  • A friend might confide, “I need to tell all about what happened at the party last night, it was wild!”

9. Spill

To accidentally or intentionally reveal a secret or confidential information. “Spill” is a casual term used to describe divulging something that was meant to be kept hidden.

  • For instance, “I accidentally spilled the news about the surprise party to the guest of honor.”
  • In a discussion about trust, someone might say, “If you spill my secret, I won’t be able to trust you again.”
  • A parent might scold their child, “Why did you have to spill the beans about the surprise vacation?”

10. Open up

To reveal or disclose personal or private information, often in a candid or vulnerable manner. “Open up” can refer to expressing one’s thoughts, feelings, or experiences.

  • For example, “During therapy, the client felt comfortable enough to open up about their childhood trauma.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “It’s important for partners to open up and communicate their needs.”
  • A friend might encourage, “If you need to talk, I’m here for you. Feel free to open up and share whatever is on your mind.”

11. Let on

To reveal or disclose information that was previously unknown or secret.

  • For example, “She let on that she had been planning a surprise party for her friend.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Don’t let on that you know about the surprise.”
  • A detective might say, “The suspect let on that he knew more than he was telling us.”

12. Break the news

To inform someone about important or significant information, especially if it is difficult or unpleasant.

  • For instance, “I had to break the news to my parents that I failed the exam.”
  • In a TV show, a character might say, “I’m sorry, but I have to break the news to you – your husband didn’t survive the accident.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll break the news to her gently, so she doesn’t get too upset.”

13. Give away

To unintentionally or accidentally reveal information that was meant to be kept secret.

  • For example, “She gave away the surprise party by mentioning it in front of the birthday girl.”
  • In a game of poker, someone might say, “His nervousness gave away his bluff.”
  • A person might say, “Be careful not to give away any sensitive information.”

14. Uncover

To reveal or discover something that was hidden or unknown.

  • For instance, “The investigation uncovered evidence of corruption within the company.”
  • In a mystery novel, the detective might uncover the truth behind a series of murders.
  • A journalist might say, “I’m determined to uncover the truth and expose the corruption.”

15. Spill your guts

To reveal or confess something, especially something personal or secret.

  • For example, “After a few drinks, he spilled his guts and confessed his true feelings.”
  • In a therapy session, a person might say, “I finally spilled my guts and talked about my childhood trauma.”
  • A friend might say, “You can trust me – spill your guts and tell me what’s been bothering you.”

16. Let out

To reveal or disclose information that was previously secret or unknown. This phrase is often used in casual conversation or storytelling.

  • For example, “He let out a secret that he promised to keep.”
  • In a suspenseful movie, a character might say, “I can’t let out the truth, it’s too dangerous.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you let out any details about the surprise party?”

17. Snitch

To secretly provide information or give evidence against someone, often to authorities or those in power. This term is commonly used in a negative context, implying betrayal.

  • For instance, “He snitched on his accomplices to get a lighter sentence.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might say, “I need someone on the inside to snitch on the gang.”
  • A friend might warn, “Don’t trust him, he’s known to snitch.”

18. Sing

To reveal incriminating or sensitive information about someone, usually to get them in trouble or to protect oneself. This slang term is often used in informal or criminal contexts.

  • For example, “He sang like a canary when the police questioned him.”
  • In a gang movie, a character might say, “No one sings, or we all go down.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “If you don’t want me to sing, buy me a slice of pizza.”

19. Tell tales

To gossip or reveal secrets about someone. This phrase is often used to describe someone who excessively shares information about others, sometimes in a negative or harmful way.

  • For instance, “She’s always telling tales about her coworkers.”
  • In a school setting, a teacher might say, “No telling tales in my classroom.”
  • A friend might complain, “I can’t trust her, she tells tales to everyone.”

20. Squeal

To betray someone’s trust by revealing information or providing incriminating evidence. This term is often used to describe someone who gives information to authorities or those in power.

  • For example, “He squealed on his partners to get a lesser sentence.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “If you squeal, you’re dead.”
  • A friend might warn, “Don’t trust him, he’ll squeal if things get tough.”

21. Tattle

This slang term refers to the act of informing on someone or revealing their secrets or wrongdoings. It is often used in a negative or gossipy context.

  • For example, a child might say, “Don’t tattle on me to mom!”
  • In a workplace setting, a coworker might complain, “She’s always tattling on everyone.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “If you tattle on me, I’ll never trust you again!”

22. Expose

To expose means to make something known or reveal something that was previously hidden or secret. It can be used in various contexts, including uncovering the truth or revealing a scandal.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I’m going to expose the corruption in this company.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “He exposed my secrets to everyone.”
  • A whistleblower might say, “I decided to expose the truth for the greater good.”

23. Reveal

Reveal simply means to disclose or make information known. It can be used in a wide range of situations, from sharing personal details to unveiling a surprise.

  • For example, a magician might say, “And now, I will reveal the secret behind this trick!”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “The final chapter will reveal the killer’s identity.”
  • A person might confess, “I can’t keep it a secret anymore. I need to reveal the truth.”

24. Unveil

To unveil means to make something public or introduce it for the first time. It is often used when referring to the official presentation or release of something.

  • For instance, a company might say, “We will unveil our new product at the upcoming conference.”
  • In the art world, an artist might say, “I’m excited to unveil my latest masterpiece.”
  • A politician might announce, “Tomorrow, I will unveil my plan for economic reform.”

25. Let slip

To let slip means to accidentally reveal or disclose something that was supposed to be kept secret or private. It implies a momentary lapse in caution or control.

  • For example, a person might say, “I let slip that I’m planning a surprise party for her.”
  • In a conversation, someone might confess, “I let it slip that I have a crush on him.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Be careful what you say around her. She’s known to let things slip.”
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