Top 30 Slang For Do Research – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to doing research, it’s essential to stay up-to-date with the latest slang terms to navigate the vast sea of information online. Curious about what phrases are trending when it comes to researching? Look no further! We’ve compiled a list of the most popular and useful slang for do research that will have you feeling like a pro in no time. Stay ahead of the game and dive into this article to level up your research skills!

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1. Hit the books

This phrase means to dedicate oneself to studying or researching a particular topic. It implies a focused and diligent approach to gathering information or acquiring knowledge.

  • For example, a student might say, “I have a big exam tomorrow, so I need to hit the books tonight.”
  • A researcher might explain, “To understand the historical context, I had to hit the books and read through numerous primary sources.”
  • Someone might advise a friend, “If you want to excel in your field, you have to hit the books and stay updated with the latest research.”

2. Dig into

This slang phrase means to delve deeply into a subject or topic, often with the intention of uncovering new information or gaining a comprehensive understanding.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I need to dig into this story and find out the truth behind the rumors.”
  • A student might express their curiosity by saying, “I can’t wait to dig into this book and learn more about the author’s perspective.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, someone might suggest, “Let’s dig into the data and analyze it from different angles.”

3. Look into

This phrase means to conduct research or gather information on a particular matter. It implies a purposeful act of exploring and seeking answers or insights.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to look into this case further to gather more evidence.”
  • A curious individual might express their interest by saying, “I want to look into the origins of this tradition and understand its cultural significance.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might suggest, “Let’s look into different perspectives and gather as much information as possible.”

4. Dive deep

This slang phrase means to fully engage in extensive research or investigation. It conveys a sense of thoroughness and commitment to exploring a subject in great detail.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “To understand this phenomenon, we need to dive deep into the data and conduct rigorous experiments.”
  • A journalist working on an investigative piece might explain, “I decided to dive deep into this story and uncover the hidden truths.”
  • A student preparing a thesis might express their dedication by saying, “I’m ready to dive deep into this topic and contribute new insights to the field.”

5. Get the scoop

This slang phrase means to obtain exclusive or behind-the-scenes information about a particular topic or event. It implies a desire to uncover details or facts that are not widely known.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to get the scoop on this celebrity scandal before anyone else.”
  • A gossip enthusiast might express their excitement by saying, “I love getting the scoop on the latest Hollywood gossip.”
  • In a conversation about a new product release, someone might ask, “Do you have any insider connections to get the scoop on the upcoming features?”

6. Explore

To investigate or examine something in order to gain knowledge or information about it. “Explore” is often used to describe the act of researching a topic or subject of interest.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to explore different sources for my research paper.”
  • A traveler might plan to “explore” a new city by learning about its history and attractions.
  • A scientist might “explore” a hypothesis by conducting experiments and analyzing data.
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7. Probe

To delve deeply into a subject or issue in order to uncover information or gain a better understanding. “Probe” is often used to describe thorough and detailed research.

  • For instance, a journalist might “probe” into a political scandal to uncover the truth.
  • A detective might “probe” a crime scene for evidence and clues.
  • A researcher might “probe” the depths of a scientific theory to uncover new insights.

8. Hunt down

To actively search for and locate information or resources. “Hunt down” implies a determined effort to find what is being sought.

  • For example, a journalist might “hunt down” sources for an investigative report.
  • A genealogist might “hunt down” family records and historical documents to trace their ancestry.
  • A student might “hunt down” books and articles for a research project.

9. Check out

To examine or investigate something, often casually or briefly. “Check out” is a more informal and relaxed term for researching or exploring a topic.

  • For instance, a friend might recommend a book and say, “You should check it out.”
  • A person might “check out” a new restaurant by reading online reviews and looking at the menu.
  • A curious individual might “check out” a website or blog for information on a specific topic.

10. Investigate

To conduct a systematic and thorough examination or inquiry into a subject in order to uncover facts or gather information. “Investigate” is a broad term that can be used to describe various types of research.

  • For example, a detective might “investigate” a crime by collecting evidence and interviewing witnesses.
  • A scientist might “investigate” a hypothesis through experiments and data analysis.
  • A journalist might “investigate” a story by researching and interviewing sources.

11. Scout out

To scout out means to explore or investigate a particular area or topic in order to gather information or gain knowledge.

  • For example, “Before going on the hike, we decided to scout out the trail to see if it was safe.”
  • In a conversation about finding a new apartment, someone might say, “I need to scout out the neighborhood to see if it’s a good fit.”
  • A journalist might mention, “I’m going to scout out the local library for resources on my article.”

To search for means to look for or seek something, usually with the intention of finding information or answers.

  • For instance, “I need to search for articles related to my research topic.”
  • In a discussion about job hunting, someone might say, “I’ve been searching for job opportunities online.”
  • A student preparing for an exam might mention, “I need to search for study guides to help me prepare.”

13. Delve into

To delve into means to explore or investigate something deeply or extensively in order to gain a thorough understanding or knowledge.

  • For example, “She decided to delve into the history of the ancient civilization.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “I can’t wait to delve into the author’s writing style.”
  • A researcher might mention, “I’m going to delve into the data to find any patterns or trends.”

14. Study up

To study up means to prepare or review a particular subject or topic in order to gain knowledge or improve understanding.

  • For instance, “I need to study up on the material before the exam.”
  • In a discussion about a new hobby, someone might say, “I’m going to study up on the basics before starting.”
  • A person preparing for a job interview might mention, “I need to study up on the company’s background and values.”

15. Research

Research refers to the process of investigating or examining a particular topic or subject in order to gain knowledge or find answers.

  • For example, “She spent hours conducting research for her thesis.”
  • In a conversation about medical advancements, someone might say, “Research plays a crucial role in discovering new treatments.”
  • A scientist might mention, “I’m currently conducting research on climate change.”

16. Go through

To carefully look at or review something in detail. “Go through” is often used to describe the process of thoroughly analyzing information or materials.

  • For example, a researcher might say, “I need to go through these documents to find the relevant data.”
  • In a conversation about reviewing a report, someone might ask, “Did you have a chance to go through it yet?”
  • A student might mention, “I have to go through all my notes before the exam to make sure I understand the material.”

17. Scrutinize

To examine or analyze something in great detail, often with a critical eye. “Scrutinize” implies a careful and thorough examination of the subject matter.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need to scrutinize the evidence for any clues.”
  • In a discussion about evaluating a proposal, someone might suggest, “Let’s scrutinize the details to ensure it meets our requirements.”
  • A teacher might advise a student, “Take the time to scrutinize your work before submitting it for grading.”

18. Ferret out

To search for and uncover hidden or hard-to-find information or evidence. “Ferret out” implies a persistent and determined effort to uncover something.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to ferret out the truth behind this story.”
  • In a conversation about investigating a crime, someone might suggest, “We need to ferret out any witnesses who might have information.”
  • A researcher might mention, “It took me a while, but I managed to ferret out the missing data.”

19. Sift through

To carefully examine or sort through a large amount of information or materials in order to find specific items or relevant details. “Sift through” suggests a process of separating and organizing information.

  • For instance, an archivist might say, “I have to sift through boxes of documents to find the right ones.”
  • In a discussion about analyzing survey responses, someone might ask, “Have you had a chance to sift through the data yet?”
  • A student might mention, “I spent hours sifting through research articles to find the relevant studies for my paper.”

20. Uncover

To discover or reveal something that was previously hidden or unknown. “Uncover” implies a process of bringing to light information or facts that were previously concealed.

  • For example, a historian might say, “I uncovered new evidence that challenges the existing narrative.”
  • In a conversation about investigating a mystery, someone might suggest, “We need to uncover the truth behind these strange occurrences.”
  • A scientist might mention, “Our research aims to uncover the mechanisms behind this phenomenon.”

21. Examine

To examine something means to closely observe or inspect it in order to gather information or understand it better.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “I need to examine the specimen under a microscope to determine its composition.”
  • A detective might examine a crime scene for evidence.
  • A teacher might ask students to examine a piece of literature for themes and symbols.
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22. Analyze

To analyze something means to break it down into its components and study it in detail in order to understand its nature or make conclusions.

  • For instance, a data analyst might analyze a large dataset to identify patterns or trends.
  • A critic might analyze a film to evaluate its themes and message.
  • A financial analyst might analyze a company’s financial statements to assess its performance.

To search means to actively look for information or data on a specific topic or subject.

  • For example, a student might search for scholarly articles to support their research paper.
  • A journalist might search for reliable sources to gather information for an article.
  • A librarian might help a patron search for books on a particular topic.

24. Review

To review something means to assess or evaluate it, often by examining it in detail and providing feedback or commentary.

  • For instance, a movie critic might review a new release, giving their opinion on its quality.
  • A professor might review a student’s essay, providing suggestions for improvement.
  • A consumer might review a product online, sharing their experience and rating.

25. Hunt for

To hunt for something means to search for it intensively or actively pursue it.

  • For example, a journalist might hunt for exclusive news stories to report.
  • A treasure hunter might hunt for hidden artifacts or treasures.
  • A researcher might hunt for obscure references or sources to support their study.

26. Dive into

To thoroughly engage in research or study. This phrase implies a deep level of involvement and exploration.

  • For example, a student might say, “I need to dive into this subject to understand it better.”
  • A researcher might state, “I’m going to dive into the archives to find more evidence.”
  • Someone discussing their approach to learning might say, “I prefer to dive into a topic rather than just skimming the surface.”

27. Crack the books

To begin studying or researching a particular subject. This phrase suggests the act of opening a book and delving into its contents.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to crack the books if I want to pass the exam.”
  • A person discussing their study habits might say, “I always crack the books before a big test.”
  • A researcher might state, “I’m going to crack the books to find more information on this topic.”

To actively look for information or resources related to a specific topic. This phrase implies a deliberate effort to find and acquire relevant information.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I need to search out some expert opinions for my article.”
  • A student might state, “I’m going to search out additional sources to support my argument.”
  • Someone discussing their research process might say, “I always search out the most up-to-date information before drawing conclusions.”

29. Scout around

To search or investigate a particular area or topic in order to gather information. This phrase suggests a sense of curiosity and thoroughness in the research process.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “I need to scout around the crime scene for any clues.”
  • A student might state, “I’m going to scout around different libraries to find the best resources.”
  • Someone discussing their approach to problem-solving might say, “I like to scout around for different perspectives before making a decision.”

30. Gather intel

To gather or collect valuable information or intelligence. This phrase is often used in a more formal or professional context, such as military or espionage operations.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I need to gather intel on the enemy’s movements.”
  • A journalist might state, “I’m going to gather intel from various sources to write a comprehensive article.”
  • Someone discussing their research process might say, “I always make sure to gather intel from reliable sources before publishing my findings.”