Top 72 Slang For Do – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the word “do,” there’s more than meets the eye. From casual conversations to social media posts, people have come up with various slang terms to express their actions and accomplishments. Whether you want to sound cool or simply keep up with the latest trends, this listicle is here to help you navigate the world of “do” slang. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and discover new ways to talk about your everyday activities!

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1. Doin’ it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively participating in or accomplishing a task or activity. It can also imply that someone is doing something well or successfully.

  • For example, if someone asks, “What are you up to?” a response could be, “Just doin’ it, working on my art.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been doin’ it all day, cleaning and organizing my house.”
  • In a motivational context, someone might say, “Keep doin’ it, don’t give up on your dreams.”

2. Gettin’ busy

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is actively engaged in a task or project, often implying a high level of productivity or busyness.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “How’s work going?” a response could be, “Oh, I’ve been gettin’ busy, working on multiple projects.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got a lot on my plate, but I’m gettin’ busy and checking things off my to-do list.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “I’ve been gettin’ busy with my art, exploring new techniques and ideas.”

3. Crushin’ it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is excelling or performing exceptionally well in a task or activity. It implies a high level of success or accomplishment.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How’s your new job going?” a response could be, “I’m crushin’ it, exceeding all expectations.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been crushin’ it at the gym, setting new personal records.”
  • In a professional context, someone might say, “Our team has been crushin’ it this quarter, surpassing our sales goals.”

4. Makin’ moves

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is actively taking steps or making progress towards a goal or objective. It implies a sense of forward momentum or initiative.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What have you been up to lately?” a response could be, “Just makin’ moves, working towards my career goals.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been makin’ moves in my personal life, making positive changes and pursuing new opportunities.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our company is makin’ moves, expanding into new markets and innovating our products.”

5. Workin’ it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is putting in effort or performing well in a task or activity. It can refer to both physical and mental work.

  • For example, if someone asks, “How’s your dance routine coming along?” a response could be, “I’ve been workin’ it, practicing every day.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been workin’ it at my job, going above and beyond to deliver results.”
  • In a fitness context, someone might say, “I’ve been workin’ it at the gym, pushing myself to new limits.”

6. Killin’ it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is doing something extremely well or achieving great success in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, “She’s killin’ it on the dance floor with her amazing moves.”
  • A person might say, “I aced my presentation at work today. I was really killin’ it.”
  • Another might comment, “The band was killin’ it on stage last night. They had the crowd going wild.”

7. Nailing it

This slang phrase is used to indicate that someone is performing a task or activity with great skill and precision, achieving the desired outcome.

  • For instance, “He’s nailing it with his guitar solo. It sounds amazing.”
  • A person might say, “I nailed it on the exam. I answered every question correctly.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s nailing it with her fashion choices. She always looks stylish.”

8. Rockin’ it

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is performing a task or activity with energy, confidence, and success.

  • For example, “The band is really rockin’ it tonight. The crowd is loving their performance.”
  • A person might say, “I’m rockin’ it at the gym. I’ve been consistently hitting my fitness goals.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s rockin’ it in her new job. She’s excelling in her role and getting recognized for her achievements.”

9. Hittin’ it

This slang phrase is used to indicate that someone is putting in effort and working hard to accomplish a task or achieve a goal.

  • For instance, “He’s hittin’ it at the gym every day. He’s determined to get in shape.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hittin’ it with my studies. I’m spending hours every day preparing for the exam.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s hittin’ it in her career. She’s taking on challenging projects and making significant progress.”

10. Pullin’ it off

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is able to successfully complete a task or achieve a goal, often despite challenges or obstacles.

  • For example, “He pulled off the difficult trick and received a standing ovation.”
  • A person might say, “I pulled it off and finished the project ahead of schedule.”
  • Another might comment, “She pulled it off and organized a successful event despite the last-minute changes.”

11. Slayin’ it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is doing something with great skill or success. It can be used to praise someone’s achievements or actions.

  • For example, “She’s slayin’ it on the dance floor!”
  • A person might say, “I was slayin’ it at work today, got so much done!”
  • Another might comment, “He’s slayin’ it in the gym, lifting heavy weights like it’s nothing.”

12. Dominate

This term is used to describe someone who is in complete control or excelling at a particular task or activity. It implies a sense of power and authority.

  • For instance, “He dominated the competition and won the championship.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to dominate this project and deliver outstanding results.”
  • Another might comment, “She dominated the game with her incredible skills and strategy.”

13. Handle it

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is capable of managing or dealing with a situation or task in a competent and successful manner.

  • For example, “She knows how to handle it when things get tough.”
  • A person might say, “I can handle it, no problem!”
  • Another might comment, “He handled the difficult customer with professionalism and ease.”

14. Own it

This term is used to convey the idea of taking full ownership and control over a situation or task. It implies confidence and assertiveness.

  • For instance, “She owned it and turned the project around.”
  • A person might say, “I made a mistake, but I’m going to own it and fix it.”
  • Another might comment, “He owned the stage with his incredible performance.”

15. Ace it

This phrase is used to describe someone who performs exceptionally well or achieves a perfect score on a task, test, or activity. It implies a high level of skill and proficiency.

  • For example, “She aced the exam and got the highest score.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to ace this presentation and impress everyone.”
  • Another might comment, “He aced the interview and got the job offer.”

16. Steppin’ up

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is actively working towards a goal or improving themselves. It implies a sense of determination and ambition.

  • For example, “I’ve been steppin’ up my game at work and taking on more responsibilities.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m steppin’ up my workout routine to get in better shape.”
  • A friend might encourage you by saying, “Keep steppin’ up and chasing your dreams!”

17. Workin’ the grind

This phrase refers to someone who is consistently working hard and putting in the necessary effort to achieve their goals. It implies a sense of dedication and perseverance.

  • For instance, “I’ve been workin’ the grind to finish this project on time.”
  • A colleague might say, “She’s always workin’ the grind and going above and beyond.”
  • Someone might share, “Workin’ the grind is tough, but it’s worth it in the end.”

18. Hustlin’

This term is often used to describe someone who is working hard and taking opportunities to make money or achieve success. It implies a sense of resourcefulness and determination.

  • For example, “He’s always hustlin’ and finding new ways to make money.”
  • A business owner might say, “Hustlin’ is essential in the competitive market.”
  • Someone might share, “I’ve been hustlin’ to build my own brand and make a name for myself.”

19. Gettin’ it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively pursuing their goals and experiencing success. It implies a sense of accomplishment and progress.

  • For instance, “She’s gettin’ it and making things happen.”
  • A friend might say, “Keep gettin’ it and reaching for the stars!”
  • Someone might share, “Gettin’ it is all about seizing opportunities and making the most of them.”

20. Grindin’

This term refers to someone who is consistently putting in effort and working towards their goals. It implies a sense of dedication and persistence.

  • For example, “I’ve been grindin’ to improve my skills and achieve success.”
  • A student might say, “Grindin’ is necessary to excel academically.”
  • Someone might share, “Grindin’ is all about staying focused and putting in the work to achieve your dreams.”

21. Doin’ the thing

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively engaged in a task or activity. It implies that the person is taking action and making progress.

  • For example, “I saw John at the gym, he was doin’ the thing and lifting some heavy weights.”
  • A friend might ask, “What have you been up to lately?” and you can respond, “Just doin’ the thing and working on my side project.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Feeling productive today, doin’ the thing and checking off my to-do list.”

22. Gettin’ things done

This phrase is used to describe someone who is actively working on and completing tasks or responsibilities. It implies a sense of productivity and accomplishment.

  • For instance, “I have a lot on my plate today, but I’m gettin’ things done.”
  • A coworker might say, “I admire your ability to stay focused and get things done.”
  • Someone might post, “Feeling motivated and productive today, gettin’ things done and crossing off my goals.”

23. Workin’ the magic

This phrase is used to describe someone who is performing exceptionally well or achieving impressive results. It implies that the person has a special skill or talent that sets them apart.

  • For example, “Sarah always knows how to work the magic and close deals.”
  • A colleague might say, “I need your help with this project, you’re great at workin’ the magic.”
  • Someone might post, “Just workin’ the magic and exceeding my own expectations.”

24. Crushin’ the competition

This phrase is used to describe someone who is outperforming or surpassing their competitors. It implies a sense of superiority and success.

  • For instance, “Our team is crushin’ the competition and consistently coming out on top.”
  • A coach might say, “Keep up the good work, you’re crushin’ the competition.”
  • Someone might post, “I’m on a winning streak and crushin’ the competition in my favorite video game.”

25. Showin’ off

This phrase is used to describe someone who is proudly displaying their skills, talents, or achievements. It implies a sense of confidence and pride.

  • For example, “He’s always showin’ off his guitar skills at parties.”
  • A friend might say, “Stop showin’ off, we get it, you’re good at everything.”
  • Someone might post a photo on social media, “Just showin’ off my new car, feeling proud of this accomplishment.”

26. Get the ball rolling

This phrase means to initiate an action or begin a process.

  • For example, in a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get the ball rolling by brainstorming ideas.”
  • In a project planning session, a leader might say, “We need to get the ball rolling on this new initiative.”
  • A friend might encourage you by saying, “Take the first step and get the ball rolling on your dream project.”

27. Go for it

This phrase is used to encourage someone to take action or pursue a goal without hesitation.

  • For instance, if someone is hesitant about asking someone out on a date, a friend might say, “Just go for it and see what happens!”
  • In a conversation about career opportunities, someone might say, “If you’re passionate about it, go for it and don’t hold back.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Believe in yourselves and go for it!”

28. Hit the jackpot

This phrase is often used to describe a situation where someone achieves a significant or unexpected success.

  • For example, if someone wins a large amount of money in a lottery, they might say, “I hit the jackpot!”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our new product launch hit the jackpot and exceeded all expectations.”
  • A friend might celebrate their good luck by saying, “I can’t believe I hit the jackpot and found my dream job!”

29. Take a stab at it

This phrase means to make an attempt at something, often when you’re not sure of the outcome.

  • For instance, if someone asks for volunteers for a difficult task, you might say, “I’ll take a stab at it and see what I can do.”
  • In a cooking class, a student might say, “I’ve never made this recipe before, but I’ll take a stab at it.”
  • A friend might encourage you by saying, “You won’t know until you try, so take a stab at it and see what happens!”

30. Go all out

This phrase means to give something your full effort or dedication without holding back.

  • For example, if someone is preparing for a marathon, they might say, “I’m going to go all out in my training.”
  • In a work context, someone might say, “We need to go all out to meet this deadline and deliver the best results.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Leave everything on the field and go all out in the game!”

31. Take a crack at it

This phrase means to try or attempt something, often when it seems challenging or difficult.

  • For example, if someone is struggling with a crossword puzzle, you might say, “Why don’t you take a crack at it?”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might encourage a student by saying, “Go ahead and take a crack at making your own pasta.”
  • If someone is hesitant about trying a new sport, a friend might say, “Just take a crack at it and see if you enjoy it.”

32. Give it a whirl

This expression means to try something, often when it’s new or unfamiliar.

  • For instance, if a friend suggests a new restaurant, you might say, “Sure, let’s give it a whirl.”
  • If someone is hesitant about trying a new hobby, you might encourage them by saying, “Why not give it a whirl? You might discover a new passion.”
  • In a conversation about adventurous activities, someone might say, “I’ve always wanted to give skydiving a whirl.”

33. Take a dive

This phrase is often used in sports to describe a player intentionally losing or performing poorly.

  • For example, if a soccer player falls to the ground without being touched to try and draw a penalty, you might say they took a dive.
  • In a discussion about a controversial match, someone might accuse a player of taking a dive to manipulate the outcome.
  • If a team intentionally loses a game to improve their draft position, you might say they took a dive.
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34. Make a go of it

This expression means to try or attempt something with the goal of achieving success.

  • For instance, if someone decides to start their own business, you might say they’re making a go of it.
  • In a conversation about pursuing a challenging career, someone might say, “I’m going to make a go of becoming an actor.”
  • If a friend is unsure about taking a risk, you might encourage them by saying, “You won’t know unless you make a go of it.”

35. Take a shot in the dark

This phrase means to make a guess or attempt something without having much information or certainty.

  • For example, if someone is asked a difficult trivia question and takes a guess, you might say they took a shot in the dark.
  • In a discussion about problem-solving, someone might suggest, “Why not take a shot in the dark and see if it works?”
  • If a friend is unsure about the answer to a riddle, you might say, “Just take a shot in the dark and see what happens.”

36. Go the extra mile

This phrase means to put in additional effort or go above and beyond what is expected. It implies going beyond the minimum requirements or expectations.

  • For example, “She always goes the extra mile to make sure her clients are satisfied.”
  • A manager might say, “If you want to succeed in this company, you need to be willing to go the extra mile.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “If you want to win, you have to go the extra mile in your training.”

37. Give it a go

This phrase means to try something or give something a chance. It is often used when encouraging someone to try something new or unfamiliar.

  • For instance, “I’ve never tried sushi before, but I’ll give it a go.”
  • A friend might say, “You should give skydiving a go, it’s an incredible experience.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you want to give it a go and see if you like it?”

38. Take a leap of faith

This phrase means to take a risk or make a decision without knowing the outcome or having complete certainty. It often involves trusting in something or someone.

  • For example, “She decided to quit her stable job and start her own business, taking a leap of faith.”
  • A person might say, “Sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith and see where it leads you.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “I’m going to take a leap of faith and tell them how I feel.”

39. Make a run for it

This phrase means to quickly and urgently escape or flee from a situation. It is often used when there is a sense of danger or a need to avoid something.

  • For instance, “When the alarm went off, they made a run for it and escaped through the back door.”
  • In a movie, a character might say, “We need to make a run for it before they catch up to us.”
  • A person might describe a close call and say, “I was about to get caught, but I made a run for it just in time.”

40. Take a chance

This phrase means to take a risk or seize an opportunity, even if the outcome is uncertain. It often involves stepping out of one’s comfort zone or trying something new.

  • For example, “He decided to take a chance and apply for the job, even though he didn’t meet all the qualifications.”
  • A friend might say, “You never know what could happen if you take a chance and pursue your passion.”
  • Someone might advise, “Sometimes you have to take a chance and see where it leads you.”

41. Give it a try

This phrase is used to encourage someone to attempt or try something, often implying that they may be unsure or hesitant. It suggests taking a chance and seeing what happens.

  • For example, if someone is hesitant to try a new food, you might say, “Go ahead, give it a try. You might actually like it.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new hobby, someone might say, “I’ve never played the guitar before, but I think I’ll give it a try.”
  • If someone is unsure about applying for a job, you might say, “You never know unless you give it a try.”

42. Take a swing at it

This phrase is often used in a sports context to encourage someone to take a shot or make an attempt at something. It implies taking a swing, similar to swinging a bat in baseball, and giving it your best shot.

  • For instance, if someone is unsure about solving a difficult problem, you might say, “Why don’t you take a swing at it? You might surprise yourself.”
  • In a discussion about trying a new skill, someone might say, “I’ve always wanted to learn how to juggle. I think I’ll take a swing at it.”
  • If someone is hesitant to ask someone out on a date, you might say, “Just take a swing at it. You never know what could happen.”

43. Make a move on

This phrase is often used in a romantic or flirtatious context to encourage someone to take action or make a move towards pursuing someone they are interested in. It implies taking the initiative and making a bold move.

  • For example, if someone is interested in someone else and unsure about making a move, you might say, “If you like them, why don’t you make a move on them?”
  • In a conversation about starting a new business, someone might say, “I’ve been thinking about it for a while, and I think it’s time to make a move on my entrepreneurial dreams.”
  • If someone is hesitant about expressing their feelings, you might say, “Life is too short to hold back. Go ahead and make a move on them.”

44. Take a shot at it

Similar to “give it a try,” this phrase is used to encourage someone to attempt or try something. It suggests taking a shot, similar to shooting at a target, and giving it your best effort.

  • For instance, if someone is unsure about solving a difficult puzzle, you might say, “Why not take a shot at it? You might surprise yourself.”
  • In a discussion about trying a new recipe, someone might say, “I’ve never cooked Indian food before, but I think I’ll take a shot at it.”
  • If someone is hesitant to participate in a competition, you might say, “You won’t know unless you take a shot at it.”

45. Go ahead

This phrase is used to give someone permission or encouragement to proceed with a particular action or decision. It implies giving someone the green light to go ahead and do something.

  • For example, if someone is unsure about whether they should speak up in a meeting, you might say, “Go ahead, share your thoughts. Your ideas are valuable.”
  • In a conversation about trying a new hairstyle, someone might say, “I think you should go ahead and try it. Hair grows back, after all.”
  • If someone is hesitant about taking a risk, you might say, “Sometimes you just have to go ahead and take the leap.”

46. Take a shot

To “take a shot” means to attempt or try something, often with an element of risk or uncertainty. It can refer to taking a chance or making an effort to achieve something.

  • For example, “I’m going to take a shot at starting my own business.”
  • In a game of basketball, a player might say, “I’m going to take a shot from downtown.”
  • A person facing a difficult task might encourage themselves by saying, “I’m going to take a shot at this and see where it leads.”

47. Get it done

To “get it done” means to finish or complete a task or objective. It implies taking action and being proactive in accomplishing something.

  • For instance, “I have a long to-do list, but I’m determined to get it all done.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to buckle down and get it done before the deadline.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might tell their team, “We have a lot of work ahead of us, so let’s focus and get it done.”

48. Make it happen

To “make it happen” means to achieve a desired outcome or make something happen, often through effort, determination, or resourcefulness.

  • For example, “I have a vision for my project, and I’m going to do whatever it takes to make it happen.”
  • A person might say, “I believe in my abilities and know I can make it happen.”
  • In a team setting, a leader might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s work together and make it happen.”

49. Crush it

To “crush it” means to perform exceptionally well or excel in a particular task or activity. It implies achieving success with great skill, confidence, or enthusiasm.

  • For instance, “I studied all night for the exam, and I’m going to go in there and crush it.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling really prepared for the presentation, so I’m going to go out there and crush it.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage their team by saying, “Go out there and give it your all. Crush it on the field.”

50. Nail it

To “nail it” means to successfully complete or accomplish something with precision, accuracy, or skill. It implies doing something perfectly or flawlessly.

  • For example, “I’ve been practicing this song for weeks, and I’m going to nail it at the performance.”
  • A person might say, “I have a lot of experience in this field, so I know I can nail it.”
  • In a cooking competition, a contestant might say, “I’m going to focus on every detail and nail it in the kitchen.”

51. Knock it out of the park

This phrase is often used to describe someone who accomplishes a task or achieves success in a remarkable way. It originates from baseball, where hitting a ball out of the park is a home run.

  • For example, “She really knocked it out of the park with her presentation. Everyone was impressed.”
  • A coach might say, “If you give it your all, you’ll knock it out of the park.”
  • When describing a successful event, someone might say, “The party was a huge success. They really knocked it out of the park.”

52. Pull it off

This phrase is used to describe someone who successfully completes a difficult or challenging task. It implies that the person was able to overcome obstacles or accomplish something that may have seemed unlikely.

  • For instance, “Despite the odds, she managed to pull it off and win the race.”
  • A friend might say, “I didn’t think you could do it, but you really pulled it off.”
  • When describing a successful project, someone might say, “They had a tight deadline, but they pulled it off and delivered an amazing result.”

53. Work it

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to showcase their skills, talents, or style. It can be used to express admiration for someone’s performance or to encourage someone to give their best effort.

  • For example, “She really knows how to work it on the dance floor.”
  • A friend might say, “You’ve been practicing, so go out there and work it!”
  • When describing a confident and stylish person, someone might say, “She always knows how to work it and turn heads.”

54. Get on with it

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start or continue with a task or activity. It implies a sense of urgency or impatience, urging someone to stop delaying and take action.

  • For instance, “Stop procrastinating and get on with it. The deadline is approaching.”
  • A boss might say, “We need to finish this project soon, so let’s get on with it.”
  • When urging someone to make a decision, someone might say, “Enough deliberation. Make up your mind and get on with it.”

55. Get down to business

This phrase is used to indicate that it’s time to start focusing on the task at hand or to stop wasting time and start working seriously. It implies a shift from casual or idle conversation to a more productive or serious mindset.

  • For example, “Enough chit-chat. Let’s get down to business and start working.”
  • A team leader might say, “We’ve discussed the plan. Now it’s time to get down to business and execute it.”
  • When preparing for an important meeting, someone might say, “Let’s get down to business and make sure we’re well-prepared.”

56. Get cracking

This phrase means to begin a task or activity, especially with urgency or enthusiasm. It is often used to encourage someone to start working or to indicate that it’s time to get started.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Alright team, let’s get cracking and start practicing!”
  • A boss might tell their employees, “We have a lot of work to do, so let’s get cracking and finish it by the end of the day.”
  • A friend might say, “We only have an hour left, so let’s get cracking on our project.”

57. Get the job done

This phrase means to successfully finish or accomplish a task or goal. It emphasizes the importance of completing the task, regardless of the specific methods or challenges involved.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “We need to deliver this report by tomorrow, so let’s focus on getting the job done.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “We’re down by 10 points, but we can still win if we stay focused and get the job done.”
  • A friend might encourage another friend by saying, “You’ve been procrastinating for too long. It’s time to stop making excuses and get the job done.”

58. Get your act together

This phrase is used to tell someone to improve their behavior, performance, or organization. It implies that the person is not meeting expectations or needs to make changes in order to be more successful.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “Your grades have been slipping. It’s time to get your act together and start studying.”
  • A coach might say to a player, “You’ve been making too many mistakes on the field. It’s time to get your act together and focus on the game.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You’ve been neglecting your chores. It’s time to get your act together and start helping out around the house.”

59. Get in the zone

This phrase means to enter a mental state of intense focus and concentration, often to perform at a high level or accomplish a task with great efficiency. It is commonly used in sports and other performance-related contexts.

  • For instance, a basketball player might say, “I need to get in the zone and make every shot count.”
  • A musician might say, “Before going on stage, I take a few minutes to get in the zone and mentally prepare for the performance.”
  • A writer might say, “When I’m writing, I need to get in the zone and block out any distractions.”

60. Get your hands dirty

This phrase means to engage in physical or practical work, often involving manual labor or getting involved in the details of a task. It implies a willingness to do the necessary work, even if it is difficult or unpleasant.

  • For example, a boss might say, “I appreciate that you’re willing to get your hands dirty and help out with the manual labor.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty and try something new. You might discover a hidden talent.”
  • A parent might encourage their child by saying, “If you want to succeed, you need to get your hands dirty and put in the effort.”

61. Execute

To perform or complete a task or action. “Execute” is often used to imply efficiency or precision in accomplishing something.

  • For example, a boss might say to an employee, “I need you to execute this project by the end of the day.”
  • In a military context, a commander might give the order, “Execute the plan as briefed.”
  • A sports coach might tell their team, “We need to execute our game plan flawlessly to win the championship.”

62. Finish it up

To bring a task or action to an end. “Finish it up” is a casual way of expressing the need to complete something.

  • For instance, a teacher might say to a student, “Finish up your homework before class starts.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might remind their coworker, “We need to finish up this report before the deadline.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Finish up your chores before you can go out to play.”

63. Wrap it up

To bring a task or action to a close. “Wrap it up” is an informal way of indicating the need to finish something.

  • For example, a meeting facilitator might say, “Let’s wrap it up and move on to the next agenda item.”
  • In a conversation, one person might suggest, “We’ve been talking for a while, let’s wrap it up and continue later.”
  • A director might tell the cast and crew, “We’re running out of time, let’s wrap up this scene and move on to the next.”

64. Deal with it

To take care of or address a situation or problem. “Deal with it” implies the need to confront or resolve an issue.

  • For instance, a supervisor might say to an employee, “There’s a customer complaint, please deal with it.”
  • In a personal context, one person might advise another, “You need to deal with your emotions instead of avoiding them.”
  • A friend might say, “I have a busy day, can you deal with picking up the groceries?”

65. Sort it out

To figure out or fix a problem or issue. “Sort it out” suggests the need to organize or clarify a situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “You made a mistake in your assignment, please sort it out.”
  • In a disagreement, one person might suggest, “Let’s take some time to cool off and then come back to sort it out.”
  • A customer service representative might say, “I apologize for the inconvenience, let me sort it out for you.”

66. Take care of it

This phrase means to handle or address a situation or problem. It implies that the person will take responsibility for resolving the issue.

  • For example, if someone asks for help with a task, you might say, “I’ll take care of it.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might say, “I trust you to take care of it on your own.”
  • If someone is worried about a problem, you could reassure them by saying, “Don’t worry, I’ll take care of it.”

67. Tackle it

This slang phrase means to confront or address a task or problem. It implies taking a proactive approach to resolving the issue.

  • For instance, if someone asks for assistance with a difficult project, you might say, “Let’s tackle it together.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage their team by saying, “Go out there and tackle it head-on.”
  • If someone is avoiding a difficult conversation, you could encourage them by saying, “It’s time to tackle it and find a resolution.”

68. Work it out

This phrase means to resolve or find a solution to a problem or conflict. It suggests putting in effort and finding a way to make things better.

  • For example, if two friends are having an argument, you might say, “You need to sit down and work it out.”
  • In a relationship, a couple might go to therapy to work out their issues.
  • If someone is struggling with a difficult decision, you could advise them to “take some time to work it out.”

69. Figure it out

This slang phrase means to find a solution to a problem or to understand something that is unclear or confusing. It implies using one’s intelligence or problem-solving skills.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling with a math problem, you might say, “Keep trying, you’ll figure it out.”
  • In a work context, a manager might give their team a challenging task and say, “I trust you to figure it out.”
  • If someone is unsure about their future plans, you could encourage them by saying, “Take your time and figure it out.”

70. Handle the business

This phrase means to take care of something efficiently and effectively. It implies a no-nonsense approach and getting the job done.

  • For example, if someone is in charge of organizing an event, you might say, “I know you’ll handle the business.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “Go out there and handle the business on the field.”
  • If someone is facing a challenging task, you could encourage them by saying, “You’ve got this, handle the business.”

71. Do the thing

This phrase is used to encourage someone to complete a task or take action. It implies that the person should not hesitate and just get it done.

  • For example, if someone is procrastinating, you might say, “Stop overthinking it and just do the thing!”
  • In a team setting, a leader might say, “We have a deadline to meet, so let’s all do the thing.”
  • If someone is unsure about how to proceed, you can say, “Take a deep breath and trust yourself. You know how to do the thing.”

72. Make it work

This phrase is often used to express the need to find a solution or make something functional, even in difficult or challenging circumstances.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling with a task, you might say, “You can do it! Just make it work.”
  • In a creative project, someone might encounter obstacles, and you can encourage them by saying, “Don’t give up. Keep pushing forward and make it work.”
  • If someone is dealing with a problem, you can offer support by saying, “I believe in you. You’ll find a way to make it work.”