Top 36 Slang For Dog In Spanish – Meaning & Usage

Dogs, or “perros,” are beloved companions in many Spanish-speaking countries. But did you know that there are various slang terms used to refer to our furry friends? In this listicle, we’ve rounded up the top slang words for dog in Spanish that will not only expand your vocabulary but also give you a glimpse into the vibrant and diverse world of Spanish language and culture. So, whether you’re a dog lover or simply looking to impress your amigos, this article is a must-read!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Perruno

This term is derived from the word “perro,” which means dog in Spanish. It is an affectionate and informal way to refer to a dog.

  • For example, “Mi perruno es muy juguetón” translates to “My doggy is very playful.”
  • A person might say, “¡Qué lindo perruno tienes!” which means “What a cute doggy you have!”
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might ask, “¿Tienes algún perruno?” which means “Do you have any doggies?”

2. Cachorro

This term specifically refers to a young dog or puppy in Spanish. It is commonly used to describe dogs that are still growing or in their early stages of life.

  • For instance, “El cachorro está aprendiendo a caminar” translates to “The puppy is learning to walk.”
  • A person might say, “¡Qué tierno ese cachorro!” which means “How cute that puppy is!”
  • In a discussion about adopting a dog, someone might ask, “¿Dónde puedo encontrar un cachorro?” which means “Where can I find a puppy?”

3. Can

This term is a shortened version of the word “canino” and is commonly used to refer to a dog in a casual or slang context. It is similar to the English term “canine.”

  • For example, “¡Mira ese can!” translates to “Look at that dog!”
  • A person might say, “Tengo un can muy leal” which means “I have a very loyal dog.”
  • In a conversation about different dog breeds, someone might ask, “¿Cuál es tu raza de can favorita?” which means “What is your favorite dog breed?”

4. Canino

This term is the formal equivalent of “can” and is used to refer to a dog in a more proper or technical context. It is derived from the Latin word “caninus,” meaning “of or relating to dogs.”

  • For instance, “El olfato canino es muy desarrollado” translates to “Canine sense of smell is highly developed.”
  • A person might say, “Los dientes caninos son puntiagudos” which means “Canine teeth are sharp.”
  • In a discussion about dog behavior, someone might ask, “¿Cómo se entienden los comportamientos caninos?” which means “How do canine behaviors communicate?”

5. Canalla

While not directly related to dogs, this term can be used in a playful or endearing way to refer to a mischievous or playful dog. It is similar to the English term “rascal.”

  • For example, “Mi perro es un canalla travieso” translates to “My dog is a mischievous rascal.”
  • A person might say, “¡Ese canalla siempre me roba los calcetines!” which means “That rascal always steals my socks!”
  • In a conversation about pets’ personalities, someone might mention, “Mi canalla es muy juguetón” which means “My rascal is very playful.”

6. Lata

This term is used to refer to a dog in a casual or colloquial way. It is derived from the word “lata,” which means can or tin can in Spanish. The slang term implies that the dog is small or compact, like a can.

  • For example, “¡Mira ese lata tan adorable!” (Look at that cute little can!)
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might say, “Tengo un lata en casa” (I have a can at home).
  • A person describing a stray dog might comment, “Vi un lata en la calle esta mañana” (I saw a can on the street this morning).

7. Sabueso

This term refers to a specific breed of hunting dog known as a hound. It can also be used more broadly to describe any dog with a keen sense of smell or tracking abilities.

  • For instance, “Mi perro es un sabueso” (My dog is a hound).
  • In a discussion about different dog breeds, someone might mention, “Los sabuesos son excelentes para la caza” (Hounds are excellent for hunting).
  • A person describing a dog’s behavior might say, “Mi perro sigue su nariz como un sabueso” (My dog follows his nose like a hound).

8. Peludo/Peludito

These terms are used to describe a dog with a lot of hair or fur. “Peludo” is the masculine form, while “peludito” is the diminutive form, which adds a sense of affection or endearment.

  • For example, “Mi perro es muy peludo” (My dog is very hairy).
  • In a conversation about grooming, someone might say, “Tengo que llevar a mi peludito a la peluquería” (I have to take my furry little one to the groomer).
  • A person describing a fluffy dog might comment, “¡Qué peludo tan adorable!” (What a cute little hairy one!)
See also  Top 34 Slang For Journeys – Meaning & Usage

9. Lomito

This term is used to refer to a small or cute dog. It is derived from the word “lomo,” which means loin or back in Spanish. The slang term implies that the dog is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand or on your lap.

  • For instance, “Mira ese lomito tan tierno” (Look at that cute little cutie).
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might say, “Tengo un lomito en casa” (I have a cutie at home).
  • A person describing a dog’s size might comment, “Es un lomito muy pequeño” (It’s a very small cutie).

10. Cacri

This term is used to refer to a dog in a playful or affectionate way. It is derived from the word “cachorro,” which means puppy in Spanish. The slang term implies that the dog is young or playful, like a puppy.

  • For example, “¡Mira ese cacri tan juguetón!” (Look at that playful little pooch!)
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might say, “Tengo un cacri en casa” (I have a pooch at home).
  • A person describing a dog’s behavior might comment, “Mi cacri siempre quiere jugar” (My pooch always wants to play).

11. Lazarillo

This term is used to refer to a guide dog, which is a specially trained dog that helps blind or visually impaired individuals navigate their surroundings.

  • For example, “Lazarillo is a loyal and intelligent guide dog for his owner.”
  • In a conversation about assistance animals, someone might say, “Guide dogs like Lazarillo provide invaluable support to their owners.”
  • A person discussing the importance of guide dogs might state, “Lazarillo and other guide dogs empower visually impaired individuals to live independent lives.”

12. Cosa

Although not specific to dogs, “cosa” is a slang term that can be used to refer to a dog in a casual or colloquial manner.

  • For instance, “Mi perro es una cosa muy divertida” translates to “My dog is a very funny thing.”
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might say, “Tengo una cosa peluda en casa” which means “I have a furry thing at home.”
  • A person sharing a funny dog video might comment, “¡Mira esta cosa juguetona!” meaning “Look at this playful thing!”

13. Cosita

Similar to “cosa,” “cosita” is a slang term that can be used to refer to a dog in an affectionate or endearing way.

  • For example, “Mi perro es una cosita muy tierna” translates to “My dog is a very sweet little thing.”
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might say, “¡Mira a esa cosita linda!” which means “Look at that cute little thing!”
  • A person sharing a photo of their dog might caption it, “Mi cosita peluda” meaning “My furry little thing.”

14. El peludo

This term is used to refer to a dog, emphasizing its hairy or furry nature.

  • For instance, “El peludo es un perro de raza” translates to “The hairy one is a purebred dog.”
  • In a conversation about grooming, someone might say, “Tengo que llevar al peludo a la peluquería” which means “I have to take the hairy one to the groomer.”
  • A person commenting on a photo of a fluffy dog might write, “¡Qué guapo es el peludo!” meaning “How handsome the hairy one is!”

15. Perro

This is the most common and straightforward term for a dog in Spanish.

  • For example, “Mi perro se llama Max” translates to “My dog’s name is Max.”
  • In a conversation about different breeds, someone might say, “Los perros son animales leales y cariñosos” which means “Dogs are loyal and affectionate animals.”
  • A person sharing a story about their dog might say, “Mi perro siempre me hace reír” meaning “My dog always makes me laugh.”

16. Chucho

This term is used to refer to a mixed-breed or mongrel dog. It is often used in a playful or endearing way.

  • For example, “Look at that cute chucho running around the park.”
  • A person might say, “I adopted a chucho from the shelter and he’s the best dog I’ve ever had.”
  • In a conversation about different dog breeds, someone might comment, “I love all dogs, whether they’re purebred or chucho.”

17. Pichicho

This term is a colloquial way to refer to a young or small dog. It is often used affectionately.

  • For instance, “I saw a pichicho playing in the park today.”
  • A person might say, “My pichicho is so energetic and loves to play fetch.”
  • In a conversation about different dog sizes, someone might say, “I prefer pichichos because they’re easier to handle.”

18. Tuso

This term is used to refer to a mixed-breed or mongrel dog. It is similar to “chucho” and is often used in a casual or friendly manner.

  • For example, “I have a cute tuso at home and he’s the best companion.”
  • A person might say, “Tusos are often healthier and have fewer genetic issues compared to purebred dogs.”
  • In a discussion about adopting dogs, someone might comment, “I prefer to adopt tusos because they have such unique personalities.”

19. Guau

This term is an onomatopoeic representation of the sound a dog makes, similar to “woof” in English. It is often used to imitate a dog’s bark.

  • For instance, “The dog barked ‘guau guau’ when someone approached the house.”
  • A person might say, “I taught my dog to bark ‘guau’ on command.”
  • In a conversation about animal sounds, someone might comment, “In Spanish, dogs say ‘guau’ instead of ‘woof’.”

20. Canejo

This term is a colloquial way to refer to a dog. It is similar to “pooch” in English and is often used in a friendly or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “I have a loyal canejo who always greets me at the door.”
  • A person might say, “Canejos make great companions and are known for their loyalty.”
  • In a conversation about different dog breeds, someone might comment, “I’ve always had canejos because they’re such loving and friendly dogs.”

21. Chango

This term is used to refer to a dog in a playful or affectionate manner. It is similar to calling a dog a “little monkey” in English.

  • For example, “¡Ven aquí, chango!” (Come here, little monkey!)
  • A person might say, “Mi chango es muy juguetón” (My dog is very playful).
  • In a cute photo of a dog, someone might comment, “¡Qué lindo chango!” (What a cute little monkey!)
See also  Top 41 Slang For Confidence – Meaning & Usage

22. Peludo

This term is used to describe a dog that is hairy or has a lot of fur. It is similar to calling a dog “hairy” or “fluffy” in English.

  • For instance, “Mi perro es muy peludo” (My dog is very hairy).
  • A person might say, “Los perros peludos son adorables” (Hairy dogs are adorable).
  • In a conversation about dog breeds, someone might mention, “Los perros de raza Shih Tzu son muy peludos” (Shih Tzu dogs are very fluffy).

23. Patas

This term is used to refer to a dog’s paws. It is similar to calling a dog’s paws “paws” in English.

  • For example, “Mi perro tiene patas grandes” (My dog has big paws).
  • A person might say, “Las patas de mi perro son muy suaves” (My dog’s paws are very soft).
  • In a conversation about dog grooming, someone might ask, “¿Cómo puedo cuidar las patas de mi perro?” (How can I take care of my dog’s paws?)

24. Firulais

This term is a common nickname for a dog, similar to calling a dog “Fido” in English. It is often used in a playful or affectionate way.

  • For instance, “¡Ven aquí, Firulais!” (Come here, Fido!)
  • A person might say, “Mi Firulais es muy leal” (My Fido is very loyal).
  • In a conversation about dog names, someone might mention, “Firulais es un nombre muy popular para perros en México” (Firulais is a very popular name for dogs in Mexico).

25. Cucho

This term is used to refer to a mixed-breed dog, similar to calling a dog a “mutt” in English. It is often used in a casual or affectionate way.

  • For example, “Mi perro es un cucho” (My dog is a mutt).
  • A person might say, “Los cuchos son muy inteligentes y leales” (Mutts are very intelligent and loyal).
  • In a conversation about adopting dogs, someone might mention, “En los refugios puedes encontrar muchos cuchos buscando un hogar” (In shelters, you can find many mutts looking for a home).

26. Cachupín

Cachupín is a slang term used to refer to a pampered or spoiled dog. It is often used to describe a dog that receives a lot of attention and is treated like a member of the family.

  • For example, “Mi cachupín tiene su propia cama y juguetes.”
  • In a discussion about pet care, someone might say, “Es importante no consentir demasiado a tu cachupín, necesita límites y disciplina.”
  • A dog owner might share a photo of their pampered pooch with the caption, “Mi cachupín vive una vida de lujo.”

27. Guachimán

Guachimán is a slang term used to refer to a watchdog or guard dog. It is often used to describe a dog that is trained to protect a property or alert its owner to potential dangers.

  • For instance, “Mi perro es un guachimán muy fiel y siempre está alerta.”
  • In a conversation about home security, someone might ask, “¿Alguien sabe dónde puedo conseguir un buen guachimán?”
  • A person might share a story about their dog’s protective instincts, saying, “Mi guachimán me salvó de un posible robo.”

28. Chuchito

Chuchito is a slang term used to refer to a young dog or puppy. It is often used as an affectionate nickname for a small and cute dog.

  • For example, “¡Mira ese chuchito tan adorable!”
  • In a conversation about getting a new pet, someone might say, “Estoy buscando adoptar un chuchito.”
  • A dog owner might share a photo of their playful pup with the caption, “Mi chuchito siempre me hace sonreír.”

29. Cachupinero

Cachupinero is a slang term used to refer to a person who loves dogs or is a dog enthusiast. It is often used to describe someone who goes above and beyond to care for and spoil their dogs.

  • For instance, “Soy un cachupinero de corazón, no puedo resistir a los perros.”
  • In a conversation about adopting a dog, someone might say, “Los cachupineros siempre buscan darle una vida mejor a los perros abandonados.”
  • A dog lover might share a photo of their furry friends with the caption, “Orgulloso cachupinero de estos lindos perritos.”

30. Guau Guau

Guau Guau is a slang term used to imitate the sound a dog makes, equivalent to “woof woof” in English. It is often used to represent the barking sound of a dog.

  • For example, “Cuando llego a casa, mis perros siempre me reciben con un guau guau.”
  • In a conversation about dog communication, someone might say, “Los perros se comunican entre ellos con ladridos, y el guau guau es uno de los sonidos más comunes.”
  • A dog owner might use the phrase “guau guau” in a playful caption for a photo of their barking dog.
See also  Top 46 Slang For Make – Meaning & Usage

31. Perrito

This term is used to refer to a small dog or a puppy in Spanish. It is an endearing term used to describe a cute or young dog.

  • For example, “¡Mira ese perrito tan lindo!” (Look at that cute puppy!)
  • A person might ask, “¿Tienes un perrito en casa?” (Do you have a puppy at home?)
  • In a conversation about pets, someone might say, “Mi perrito es muy juguetón” (My puppy is very playful).

32. Toto

This slang term is used in some Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a mixed-breed or mutt dog. It can also be used as a playful or affectionate term for any dog.

  • For instance, “Mi perro es un toto” (My dog is a mutt).
  • In a conversation about adopting a dog, someone might say, “Prefiero tener un toto en vez de un perro de raza” (I prefer to have a mutt instead of a purebred dog).
  • A person might affectionately say, “¡Ven aquí, toto!” (Come here, mutt!)

33. Chucha

This term is used in some Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a mixed-breed or mutt dog. It is a colloquial and informal word used to describe dogs of unknown or mixed ancestry.

  • For example, “Ese perro es una chucha” (That dog is a mutt).
  • In a conversation about adopting a dog, someone might say, “Me encantan las chuchas, son muy leales” (I love mutts, they are very loyal).
  • A person might ask, “¿Tienes una chucha en casa?” (Do you have a mutt at home?)

34. Guagua

This term is used in some Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a puppy or a young dog. It is a colloquial word used to describe a cute or small dog.

  • For instance, “Mi guagua es muy juguetona” (My puppy is very playful).
  • In a conversation about dogs, someone might say, “Tengo una guagua en casa, es muy tierna” (I have a puppy at home, she is very sweet).
  • A person might ask, “¿Quieres acariciar a mi guagua?” (Do you want to pet my puppy?)

35. Chihuahua

This term refers to the Chihuahua breed of dog. It is a specific breed known for its small size and distinctive appearance.

  • For example, “Tengo un Chihuahua llamado Coco” (I have a Chihuahua named Coco).
  • In a conversation about small dog breeds, someone might say, “El Chihuahua es el perro más pequeño del mundo” (The Chihuahua is the smallest dog in the world).
  • A person might ask, “¿Sabías que los Chihuahuas son originarios de México?” (Did you know that Chihuahuas are originally from Mexico?)

36. Raza

In Spanish slang, “raza” is used to refer to a dog’s breed. It can also be used to describe a group or community of dogs.

  • For example, “Mi perro es de raza labrador” (My dog is a Labrador breed).
  • In a conversation about different types of dogs, one might ask, “¿Cuál es tu raza de perro favorita?” (What is your favorite dog breed?).
  • Someone might say, “Me encanta la raza de perros pequeños” (I love small dog breeds).