Top 59 Slang For Doing A Good Job – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to doing a good job, sometimes words like “excellent” and “great” just don’t cut it. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of slang terms that capture the essence of doing a stellar job. Whether you’re looking to impress your boss or simply want to spice up your vocabulary, this listicle is for you. So get ready to level up your praise game and show everyone that you’re the real deal!

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1. Smashed it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has done a fantastic job or achieved great success in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, after a successful presentation, someone might say, “You really smashed it up there!”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might exclaim, “He smashed it into the back of the net!”
  • After a challenging project is completed, a coworker might say, “We absolutely smashed it, guys!”

2. Owned it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has taken complete control of a situation or task and performed exceptionally well.

  • For instance, after a flawless performance, someone might say, “You completely owned it on stage!”
  • In a gaming context, a player might say, “I owned it in that last match, nobody stood a chance!”
  • After successfully completing a difficult project, a colleague might say, “You owned it from start to finish, great job!”

3. Slayed it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has performed exceptionally well or achieved great success in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, after a stunning dance performance, someone might say, “You absolutely slayed it on the dance floor!”
  • In a cooking context, a chef might say, “I slayed it with that new recipe, the flavors are amazing!”
  • After delivering a powerful speech, a speaker might be praised, “You slayed it on stage, the audience was captivated!”

4. Bossed it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has handled or executed a task in an authoritative and successful manner, showing great skill and control.

  • For instance, after a flawless negotiation, someone might say, “You totally bossed it in that meeting!”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “He bossed it on the field, leading the team to victory!”
  • After successfully organizing a big event, a coordinator might say, “We absolutely bossed it, everything went smoothly!”

5. Aced it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has performed exceptionally well or achieved a perfect score in a test, examination, or any other task.

  • For example, after getting all the answers correct in a quiz, someone might say, “You aced it, you’re so smart!”
  • In an academic context, a teacher might say, “She aced the final exam, her hard work paid off!”
  • After completing a challenging project flawlessly, a supervisor might say, “You aced it, great job!”

6. Knocked it out of the park

This phrase is often used to describe someone who has done an outstanding job or achieved great success in a particular task or endeavor.

  • For example, “John really knocked it out of the park with his presentation. The clients were extremely impressed.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The quarterback threw a perfect pass and knocked it out of the park.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might write, “Samantha consistently knocks it out of the park with her attention to detail and high-quality work.”

7. Did a stellar job

This phrase is used to describe someone who has done an excellent or outstanding job. “Stellar” is a word that means “of or relating to stars,” so it suggests that the person’s performance was exceptional, like the brilliance of a star.

  • For instance, “The team did a stellar job on the project. They exceeded all expectations.”
  • A teacher might say, “Emily’s essay was truly stellar. She demonstrated a deep understanding of the subject.”
  • A manager might praise an employee by saying, “You did a stellar job leading the team through a challenging project.”

8. Did an amazing job

This phrase is used to describe someone who has done an extremely impressive or outstanding job. “Amazing” means causing great surprise or wonder, so it suggests that the person’s performance was extraordinary or beyond expectations.

  • For example, “The chef did an amazing job creating a unique and delicious dish.”
  • A parent might say, “My child did an amazing job in the school play. I couldn’t be prouder.”
  • A colleague might compliment a coworker by saying, “You did an amazing job presenting the data. It was clear and persuasive.”

9. Did an outstanding job

This phrase is used to describe someone who has done an exceptionally good or remarkable job. “Outstanding” means standing out from others, so it suggests that the person’s performance was exceptional and worthy of recognition.

  • For instance, “The team did an outstanding job on the project. Their attention to detail was impeccable.”
  • A teacher might write on a student’s paper, “You did an outstanding job on this assignment. Your analysis was insightful and well-supported.”
  • A supervisor might say to an employee, “You did an outstanding job leading the team through a difficult situation. Your calm and decisive actions saved the day.”

10. Did a fantastic job

This phrase is used to describe someone who has done an exceptionally good or impressive job. “Fantastic” means extraordinarily good or great, so it suggests that the person’s performance was outstanding and deserving of praise.

  • For example, “The designer did a fantastic job creating a visually stunning website.”
  • A friend might say, “You did a fantastic job organizing the party. Everyone had a great time.”
  • A manager might commend an employee by saying, “You did a fantastic job on the presentation. Your ideas were innovative and well-presented.”

11. Did a phenomenal job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did an outstanding job or achieved remarkable results. It emphasizes the exceptional nature of their performance.

  • For example, “She did a phenomenal job on the presentation. It was captivating and well-researched.”
  • A supervisor might say, “You did a phenomenal job leading the team through a challenging project.”
  • A coach might praise an athlete, “You did a phenomenal job in the game today. Your performance was top-notch.”

12. Did a remarkable job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did a job that stands out and is worthy of notice. It highlights the notable and impressive nature of their performance.

  • For instance, “He did a remarkable job on the project. His creativity and attention to detail were exceptional.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “You did a remarkable job on your essay. Your analysis was insightful and well-supported.”
  • A colleague might compliment a coworker, “You did a remarkable job handling that difficult client. Your professionalism and patience were commendable.”

13. Did a superb job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did an excellent job or achieved a high level of performance. It emphasizes the superior quality of their work.

  • For example, “They did a superb job organizing the event. Everything was well-planned and executed.”
  • A manager might say to an employee, “You did a superb job on the project. Your attention to detail and efficiency were outstanding.”
  • A team member might compliment a colleague, “You did a superb job in the meeting. Your ideas were insightful and well-presented.”

14. Did a great job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did a job that is commendable and praiseworthy. It acknowledges their positive performance without emphasizing any exceptional or remarkable aspects.

  • For instance, “She did a great job on the report. It was well-written and organized.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “You did a great job cleaning your room. It’s neat and tidy.”
  • A friend might compliment another friend, “You did a great job on the presentation. It was clear and engaging.”

15. Did an excellent job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did a job that is of high quality and exceeds expectations. It emphasizes the outstanding nature of their performance.

  • For example, “He did an excellent job on the project. His research and analysis were thorough and insightful.”
  • A supervisor might say to an employee, “You did an excellent job with the client presentation. Your delivery was confident and persuasive.”
  • A teacher might praise a student, “You did an excellent job on the exam. Your answers were accurate and well-explained.”

16. Did a top-notch job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did an outstanding job or achieved a high level of quality in their work.

  • For example, “She did a top-notch job on the presentation. It was very well-researched and professionally delivered.”
  • A manager might say, “John did a top-notch job on that project. He exceeded all expectations and delivered excellent results.”
  • A coworker might compliment their colleague by saying, “You did a top-notch job on that report. Your attention to detail is impressive.”

17. Did a flawless job

This phrase is used to describe someone who performed their task or job flawlessly, without any errors or mistakes.

  • For instance, “The chef did a flawless job with the dessert. It looked and tasted perfect.”
  • A supervisor might say, “Sarah did a flawless job on the customer service call. She handled the situation with professionalism and resolved the issue smoothly.”
  • A teammate might praise their coworker by saying, “You did a flawless job on that presentation. Your delivery was smooth and your slides were well-designed.”

18. Did a perfect job

This phrase is used to describe someone who completed their task or job perfectly, without any flaws or imperfections.

  • For example, “He did a perfect job on the painting. The colors are vibrant and the brushstrokes are precise.”
  • A supervisor might say, “Emily did a perfect job on the project. She followed all the guidelines and delivered a flawless result.”
  • A coworker might compliment their colleague by saying, “You did a perfect job on that spreadsheet. It’s organized and error-free.”

19. Did an impressive job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did a job that left a strong impression due to their exceptional performance or skills.

  • For instance, “The actor did an impressive job in the play. His portrayal of the character was captivating.”
  • A manager might say, “Mark did an impressive job leading the team. His leadership skills and ability to motivate others were outstanding.”
  • A coworker might praise their colleague by saying, “You did an impressive job on that sales pitch. Your presentation was persuasive and engaging.”

20. Did a bang-up job

This phrase is used to describe someone who did an excellent job or achieved great results in their work.

  • For example, “She did a bang-up job on the project. It was completed ahead of schedule and exceeded expectations.”
  • A supervisor might say, “Tom did a bang-up job on the event planning. The event was a huge success thanks to his efforts.”
  • A teammate might compliment their coworker by saying, “You did a bang-up job on that report. Your analysis was thorough and your recommendations were spot-on.”

21. Did a splendid job

When someone does a splendid job, they have executed a task or assignment with great skill or excellence.

  • For example, “You did a splendid job on that presentation. The audience was captivated.”
  • Another example, “The chef did a splendid job with the dessert. It was both delicious and beautifully presented.”
  • Someone might say, “I just finished cleaning the house, and I must say, I did a splendid job!”

22. Did a marvelous job

When someone does a marvelous job, they have completed a task or project with great success or excellence.

  • For instance, “You did a marvelous job organizing the event. Everything went smoothly.”
  • Another example, “The artist did a marvelous job capturing the essence of the subject in their painting.”
  • Someone might say, “I finished the report ahead of schedule, and I must say, I did a marvelous job!”

23. Did an awesome job

When someone does an awesome job, they have accomplished a task or objective with great skill or excellence.

  • For example, “You did an awesome job fixing the car. It’s running better than ever.”
  • Another example, “The team did an awesome job winning the championship. They played with determination and skill.”
  • Someone might say, “I just finished redecorating my room, and I must say, I did an awesome job!”

24. Did a killer job

When someone does a killer job, they have completed a task or assignment with outstanding skill or excellence.

  • For instance, “You did a killer job on that project. It exceeded all expectations.”
  • Another example, “The musician did a killer job performing live. The audience was blown away.”
  • Someone might say, “I just finished baking a cake from scratch, and I must say, I did a killer job!”

25. Did a wicked job

When someone does a wicked job, they have executed a task or project with impressive skill or excellence.

  • For example, “You did a wicked job on that dance routine. Your moves were flawless.”
  • Another example, “The writer did a wicked job crafting the suspense in the novel. It kept readers on the edge of their seats.”
  • Someone might say, “I just finished organizing my closet, and I must say, I did a wicked job!”

26. Dominated

To dominate means to completely control or outperform someone or something. It is often used to describe a situation where someone has excelled or achieved a high level of success.

  • For example, after winning a race, a runner might say, “I dominated the competition.”
  • In a sports game, a commentator might say, “The team dominated their opponents, scoring twice as many points.”
  • A boss might praise an employee by saying, “You really dominated that project, great job!”

27. Hit it out of the park

This phrase comes from baseball and refers to hitting the ball so hard and far that it goes beyond the boundaries of the field, resulting in a home run. It is used metaphorically to describe achieving great success or performing exceptionally well in any area.

  • For instance, after a successful presentation, someone might say, “You really hit it out of the park with that pitch.”
  • A chef might say, “The dish turned out amazing, I really hit it out of the park with this recipe.”
  • A musician might describe a concert as, “We played our hearts out and hit it out of the park with the performance.”

28. Crushed the competition

To crush the competition means to defeat or outperform competitors by a large margin. It implies overwhelming success and dominance over others.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “Our product launch was a huge success, we crushed the competition.”
  • In a sports tournament, a team might say, “We played our best and crushed the competition, winning every match.”
  • A student might boast, “I studied hard and crushed the competition in the spelling bee.”

29. Ruled it

To rule it means to excel or perform exceptionally well in a given task or situation. It implies being in control and achieving a high level of success.

  • For instance, after a successful performance, a dancer might say, “I really ruled it on stage tonight.”
  • In a video game, a player might say, “I played for hours and ruled it, reaching the highest level.”
  • A teacher might praise a student by saying, “You studied diligently and ruled it on the exam.”

30. Killed the game

To kill the game means to achieve tremendous success or dominate a particular field. It implies surpassing expectations and achieving outstanding results.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I released my new album and killed the game, topping the charts.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our marketing campaign was a huge success, we killed the game and gained a lot of customers.”
  • A chef might describe a dish as, “This recipe killed the game, it became an instant hit with customers.”

31. Smoked it

When someone “smokes it,” it means they have done an outstanding job or achieved great success in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, after winning a race, a runner might say, “I smoked it and set a new personal record.”
  • In a cooking competition, a chef might exclaim, “I smoked it with my signature dish!”
  • A student might proudly announce, “I smoked the exam and got the highest grade in the class.”

32. Mastered it

To “master it” means to become highly skilled or proficient in a particular task or area.

  • For instance, a musician might say, “I practiced for hours and finally mastered that difficult piano piece.”
  • In a sports context, an athlete might declare, “I’ve been training hard and now I’ve mastered the technique.”
  • A software developer might boast, “After months of learning, I finally mastered coding in Python.”

33. Owned the game

When someone “owns the game,” it means they have achieved complete dominance or control over a particular activity or competition.

  • For example, a basketball player might say, “I owned the game and scored 40 points.”
  • In a video game tournament, a player might boast, “I owned the game and didn’t lose a single match.”
  • A salesperson might brag, “I owned the game and closed the most deals in the company.”

34. Conquered it

To “conquer it” means to successfully overcome a difficult challenge or obstacle and achieve a positive outcome.

  • For instance, a mountaineer might say, “I conquered the mountain and reached the summit.”
  • In a business context, an entrepreneur might declare, “I conquered the market and became the industry leader.”
  • A student might proudly announce, “I conquered the difficult math problem and solved it correctly.”

35. Ace it

When someone “aces it,” it means they have performed exceptionally well or achieved a high level of success in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, a student might say, “I studied hard and aced the exam.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might proudly state, “I aced the interview and got the job.”
  • A chef might exclaim, “I aced the recipe and received rave reviews from the customers.”

36. Killing it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is doing a great job or excelling in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, “She’s killing it in her new job, earning multiple promotions within a year.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “The team is killing it this season, winning every game so far.”
  • A musician might receive praise from a fan, saying, “You’re killing it on stage with your incredible guitar skills.”

37. Crushing it

This slang phrase is used to indicate that someone is performing exceptionally well or achieving great success in a particular endeavor.

  • For instance, “He’s crushing it in his sales job, consistently exceeding his targets.”
  • In a fitness context, one might say, “She’s been crushing it at the gym, setting new personal records in every workout.”
  • A student might receive praise from their teacher, saying, “You’re really crushing it in your academics this semester.”

38. Rocking it

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is doing an excellent job or performing exceptionally well in a task or activity.

  • For example, “She’s rocking it in her presentation, captivating the audience with her confident delivery.”
  • In a music context, one might say, “The band is rocking it on stage, energizing the crowd with their high-energy performance.”
  • A chef might receive compliments from a customer, saying, “You’re really rocking it in the kitchen, creating delicious and innovative dishes.”

39. Slaying it

This slang phrase is used to convey that someone is doing an outstanding job or performing at a very high level in a particular task or activity.

  • For instance, “He’s slaying it in his role as team captain, leading by example and motivating his teammates.”
  • In a fashion context, one might say, “She’s slaying it with her stylish outfits, always making a fashion statement.”
  • A gamer might receive praise from their online teammates, saying, “You’re slaying it in the game, carrying the team to victory with your impressive skills.”

40. Bossing it

This slang phrase is used to describe someone who is confidently and successfully managing a task or situation, often with a sense of authority and expertise.

  • For example, “She’s bossing it at work, leading the team to achieve record-breaking results.”
  • In a leadership context, one might say, “He’s really bossing it as the CEO, making strategic decisions that drive the company’s success.”
  • A coach might praise their athlete, saying, “You’re bossing it on the field, demonstrating exceptional skills and leadership.”

41. Smashing it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is doing a great job or excelling in a particular task or activity.

  • For example, “John is really smashing it with his sales numbers this month.”
  • A manager might say, “You’re smashing it with your project management skills.”
  • A teacher might praise a student by saying, “You’re really smashing it in class lately.”

42. Owning it

To “own it” means to take full responsibility for a task or situation and perform exceptionally well.

  • For instance, “She really owned it during the presentation and impressed everyone.”
  • A coach might say, “You’re owning it on the field, keep up the good work.”
  • A colleague might compliment another by saying, “You’re owning it in the office, your work ethic is inspiring.”

43. Killing the game

This phrase is used to describe someone who is performing exceptionally well and surpassing others in their field or industry.

  • For example, “She’s killing the game in the music industry with her latest album.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “He’s killing the game on the basketball court, his skills are unmatched.”
  • A friend might say, “You’re killing the game with your fashion sense, you always look stylish.”

44. Doing work

This phrase is used to describe someone who is putting in the effort and achieving results through hard work and dedication.

  • For instance, “She’s really doing work with her fitness routine, she’s made significant progress.”
  • A colleague might say, “You’re doing work with your efficiency, you’re always ahead of deadlines.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s go out there and do work, give it your all.”

45. Acing it

To “ace it” means to perform exceptionally well or achieve success in a task or activity.

  • For example, “He aced the exam and got a perfect score.”
  • A teacher might say, “You’re acing it in class, keep up the good work.”
  • A friend might compliment another by saying, “You’re acing it in your job, you’ve been promoted twice in a year.”

46. Knocking it out of the park

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is performing exceptionally well or exceeding expectations in a particular task or endeavor.

  • For example, “She gave a presentation at work today and really knocked it out of the park.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “The pitcher threw a perfect game and really knocked it out of the park.”
  • A teacher might praise a student by saying, “You studied really hard and aced the test. You really knocked it out of the park!”

47. Nailing it

This phrase is used to describe someone who is doing an excellent job or performing exceptionally well in a particular task or activity.

  • For instance, “She nailed the dance routine during the performance.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “You nailed the presentation. It was clear, concise, and engaging.”
  • A friend might compliment another friend’s cooking skills by saying, “You really nailed that recipe. It was delicious!”

48. Crushing the game

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is excelling or dominating in a particular activity or endeavor.

  • For example, “He’s been training really hard and is crushing the game in the upcoming marathon.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Our sales team is crushing the game this quarter. They’ve exceeded all targets.”
  • A gamer might boast, “I’ve been practicing for hours and now I’m crushing the game. No one can beat me!”

49. Slaying the game

This phrase is used to describe someone who is performing exceptionally well or excelling in a particular field or activity.

  • For instance, “She’s been working tirelessly and is slaying the game in the fashion industry.”
  • In a music context, someone might say, “The band’s latest album is amazing. They’re really slaying the game.”
  • A student might proudly exclaim, “I studied really hard and got an A on the exam. I’m slaying the game!”

50. Bossing the game

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is dominating or excelling in a particular activity or endeavor.

  • For example, “He’s been practicing non-stop and is bossing the game in the basketball tournament.”
  • In a work context, someone might say, “She’s been taking on challenging projects and bossing the game at the office.”
  • A gamer might declare, “I’ve mastered all the levels and I’m bossing the game. No one can beat me!”

51. Smashing the game

This phrase is used to describe someone who is excelling or achieving great success in their work.

  • For example, “John is smashing the game with his innovative ideas and hard work.”
  • A colleague might say, “You’re really smashing the game with your sales numbers this quarter.”
  • In a performance review, a manager might praise an employee by saying, “You’ve been smashing the game with your attention to detail and dedication to quality.”

52. Owning the game

This expression conveys a sense of mastery or dominance in one’s work or area of expertise.

  • For instance, “Samantha is owning the game with her exceptional leadership skills.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team’s star player is owning the game with their incredible performance.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might mention, “I have a proven track record of owning the game in my previous roles.”

53. Killing it at work

This phrase is used to describe someone who is excelling or achieving great success in their work.

  • For example, “Sarah is killing it at work with her ability to meet deadlines and exceed expectations.”
  • A coworker might say, “You’re really killing it at work with your impressive productivity.”
  • In a performance review, a supervisor might commend an employee by saying, “You’ve been consistently killing it at work with your outstanding performance.”

54. Crushing it at work

This expression signifies someone who is excelling or performing exceptionally well in their work.

  • For instance, “Mark is crushing it at work with his ability to handle multiple projects simultaneously.”
  • A manager might say, “You’re really crushing it at work with your strong leadership and problem-solving skills.”
  • In a team meeting, a colleague might compliment a coworker by saying, “You’ve been consistently crushing it at work with your high-quality deliverables.”

55. Rocking it at work

This phrase is used to describe someone who is excelling or achieving great success in their work.

  • For example, “Emily is rocking it at work with her ability to adapt to new challenges.”
  • A coworker might say, “You’re really rocking it at work with your positive attitude and strong work ethic.”
  • In a performance evaluation, a supervisor might praise an employee by saying, “You’ve been consistently rocking it at work with your exceptional results.”

56. Slaying it at work

This phrase is used to describe someone who is doing an outstanding job at work.

  • For example, “She’s slaying it at work with her innovative ideas.”
  • A coworker might say, “You’re slaying it at work lately, keep up the good work!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Just got a promotion, slaying it at work!”

57. Bossing it at work

This slang term means to be in control and doing an excellent job at work.

  • For instance, “He’s bossing it at work by leading the team to success.”
  • A colleague might say, “You’re really bossing it at work, keep up the great work!”
  • Someone might comment, “I saw your presentation, you were totally bossing it at work!”

58. Smashing it at work

This phrase is used to describe someone who is achieving great success and doing an exceptional job at work.

  • For example, “She’s smashing it at work with her sales numbers.”
  • A coworker might say, “You’re absolutely smashing it at work, keep up the amazing work!”
  • Someone might write in a performance review, “The employee has been consistently smashing it at work.”

59. Owning it at work

This slang term means to take complete control of a situation and excel at work.

  • For instance, “He’s really owning it at work by taking charge of the project.”
  • A colleague might say, “You’re totally owning it at work, keep up the fantastic work!”
  • Someone might write in a recommendation, “The employee consistently owns it at work and exceeds expectations.”
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