Top 49 Slang For Dollar Bill – Meaning & Usage

Money makes the world go round, and the slang for dollar bill is no exception. Whether you’re a cash enthusiast or just looking to expand your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. From the classic “greenbacks” to the lesser-known “dead presidents,” we’ve compiled a list of the most interesting and quirky terms used to refer to everyone’s favorite form of currency. Get ready to level up your slang game and impress your friends with this dollar bill dictionary!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Benjamins

This term refers to one hundred dollar bills, which feature a portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the front. It is often used to describe a large amount of money.

  • For example, “He made it rain with Benjamins at the strip club.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, someone might say, “I’m rolling in Benjamins.”
  • A person might boast, “I just got paid, and it’s all in Benjamins.”

2. C-notes

This slang term is derived from the Roman numeral “C” which represents the number 100. It is used to refer to one hundred dollar bills.

  • For instance, “He paid for the car in C-notes.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might say, “I’ve got a stack of C-notes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break this C-note for me?”

3. Dead presidents

This term is used to refer to paper currency, particularly dollar bills, which feature portraits of deceased U.S. presidents.

  • For example, “I need some dead presidents to pay for this.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I’m all about those dead presidents.”
  • A person might comment, “I’ve got a wallet full of dead presidents.”

4. Greenbacks

This slang term originated during the American Civil War when the U.S. government issued green-colored paper money. It is now used to refer to dollar bills in general.

  • For instance, “He paid for the concert tickets with greenbacks.”
  • In a discussion about cash, someone might say, “I need some more greenbacks.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a few greenbacks?”

5. Clams

This term is derived from the resemblance between a dollar bill and a clamshell. It is a colloquial way of referring to dollar bills.

  • For example, “He made a fortune and now he’s swimming in clams.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “I’ve got a pocketful of clams.”
  • A person might comment, “I need to earn some more clams.”

6. Bones

This is a slang term for dollar bills. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I need to save up some bones before I can afford that new gadget.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you 20 bones for that old video game.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How many bones do you think you spend on coffee each month?”

7. Bucks

This is a common slang term for dollar bills. It is widely used and understood in informal conversations.

  • For instance, “I paid 50 bucks for this shirt.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you 10 bucks if you help me move.”
  • In a discussion about prices, someone might ask, “How much is that car? A couple of thousand bucks?”

8. Grand

This term refers to one thousand dollars. It is often used in a casual or colloquial context.

  • For example, “I saved up enough to buy a new laptop. It cost me two grand.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll pay you two grand for that vintage guitar.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, someone might mention, “I spent three grand on my vacation.”

9. K

This slang term is an abbreviation for “thousand.” It is commonly used to refer to a large amount of money.

  • For instance, “I just got a bonus of 10k!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give you 5k for that painting.”
  • In a discussion about salaries, someone might ask, “How much are you making? 60k?”

10. Scratch

This term is slang for money in general, including dollar bills. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I need to earn some scratch to pay my bills.”
  • A person might say, “I made a lot of scratch from that freelance gig.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “How much scratch do you have saved up?”

11. Singles

This term refers to individual one-dollar bills. It is commonly used when referring to a stack of one-dollar bills.

  • For instance, “I paid for my coffee with a handful of singles.”
  • In a discussion about tipping, someone might say, “I always carry a few singles for tipping the valet.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you need any singles with your change?”

12. Deuce

This term specifically refers to the two-dollar bill, which is less common than other denominations. It is often used when talking about the uniqueness or rarity of the bill.

  • For example, “I found a deuce in my grandfather’s old wallet.”
  • In a discussion about collecting currency, someone might say, “I have a deuce from the 1950s.”
  • A cashier might inform a customer, “We accept deuces, but not all places do.”

13. Fin

This term is slang for the five-dollar bill. It is commonly used in casual conversations and can refer to a single five-dollar bill or a collection of them.

  • For instance, “I only have a fin left in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I set aside a fin each week for my savings.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a twenty? I need some fins.”

14. Sawbuck

This slang term is used to refer to the ten-dollar bill. It originates from the resemblance of the Roman numeral for ten (X) to a sawhorse, which is a type of support used in woodworking.

  • For example, “I need to break this sawbuck for smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about cash, someone might say, “I only have sawbucks in my wallet.”
  • A cashier might inform a customer, “We can’t accept sawbucks for small purchases.”

15. Jackson

This term is used to refer to the twenty-dollar bill. It is named after Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, whose portrait is featured on the bill.

  • For instance, “I need to withdraw some Jacksons from the ATM.”
  • In a discussion about cash flow, someone might say, “I’m running low on Jacksons.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a Jackson? I need some smaller bills.”

16. Frog

This term refers to a dollar bill, specifically because of the green color of US currency. It can also be used to refer to money in general.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to save up some frogs for my vacation.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might comment, “I’ve got a few frogs in my wallet.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m making it rain frogs in the club tonight.”

17. C-note

This slang term is used to refer to a one-hundred-dollar bill. The “C” stands for “century,” which is another word for one hundred.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just found a C-note on the street!”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, a person might mention, “I paid for that TV with a C-note.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you lend me a C-note? I’ll pay you back next week.”

18. Yard

This slang term is used to refer to a thousand dollars. It comes from the fact that “yard” is slang for a hundred dollars, and a thousand dollars is ten times that amount.

  • For example, someone might say, “I spent a yard on new clothes.”
  • In a discussion about saving money, a person might advise, “Try to save at least a yard each month.”
  • A person might brag, “I just made a yard in profits from my business.”

19. Stack

This term refers to a large amount of money, typically in the form of a bundle of cash. It can also be used to refer to a thousand dollars.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just made a stack from my side hustle.”
  • In a conversation about financial goals, a person might state, “I want to save up a stack by the end of the year.”
  • A rapper might boast, “I’m flexing with stacks of cash in my music video.”

20. Rack

This term is used to refer to a thousand dollars. It comes from the fact that “rack” is slang for a hundred dollars, and a thousand dollars is ten times that amount.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just spent a rack on concert tickets.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might mention, “I’m trying to save up a rack for a down payment.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have a rack I can borrow? I’ll pay you back next month.”

21. Large

This term is used to refer to a $100 bill. The word “large” is used because it represents a large amount of money compared to smaller denominations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I paid for the dinner with a large.”
  • In a conversation about finances, one might say, “I need to save up a few larges before I can afford that vacation.”
  • A person might show off their money and say, “Look at this stack of larges I just earned.”

22. D-note

This slang term is used to refer to a $10 bill. The term “D-note” comes from the Roman numeral for 500, which resembles the letter “D” and represents the value of multiple $10 bills.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Can you lend me a D-note? I forgot my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, one might say, “I only have a few D-notes left for the week.”
  • A person might mention, “I found a D-note on the ground today. Lucky me!”

23. Blue cheese

This slang term is used to refer to a $1,000 bill. The term “blue cheese” comes from the blue color of the bill and the fact that it is worth a significant amount, similar to the expensive cheese.

  • For example, someone might say, “I wish I had a stack of blue cheese.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, one might say, “He’s got so much money, he’s swimming in blue cheese.”
  • A person might jokingly ask, “Can you break a blue cheese? I need change for a soda.”

24. Century note

This term is used to refer to a $100 bill. The term “century note” is derived from the word “century,” meaning 100 years, and represents the value of the bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I just found a century note in my pocket.”
  • In a discussion about cash, one might say, “I need to break this century note into smaller bills.”
  • A person might mention, “I’m saving up century notes to buy a new computer.”

25. Benny

This slang term is used to refer to a $100 bill. The term “Benny” is derived from the name Benjamin Franklin, whose portrait appears on the bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe I lost a Benny.”
  • In a conversation about expenses, one might say, “That concert ticket cost me two Bennies.”
  • A person might boast, “I made a stack of Bennies from my latest business venture.”

26. G

This slang term refers to a thousand dollars. It is often used to describe a large amount of money.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a quick G from selling my old clothes.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, one might say, “That new gaming console costs a couple of Gs.”
  • A person bragging about their income might say, “I’m making six figures, easily pulling in a few Gs every month.”

27. Band

This slang term refers to a large amount of money, usually in the form of bills that are bound together.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I just got paid, now I’ve got a band in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about financial goals, one might say, “I’m saving up to have a band in my savings account.”
  • A person showing off their money might say, “Check out this band I just made from my latest business venture.”

28. Buck

This is a common slang term for a dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a buck on the ground.”
  • In a conversation about prices, one might say, “That shirt is only five bucks.”
  • A person asking for money might say, “Can you lend me a few bucks until payday?”

29. Greenback

This slang term specifically refers to US dollar bills, which are green in color.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to exchange some greenbacks for euros.”
  • In a discussion about currency, one might say, “The greenback is widely recognized as a symbol of American wealth.”
  • A person commenting on the value of the US dollar might say, “The greenback is losing its strength against other currencies.”

30. Benji

This slang term specifically refers to a one hundred dollar bill, featuring the portrait of Benjamin Franklin.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just made a couple of Benjis from my side hustle.”
  • In a conversation about expensive purchases, one might say, “That concert ticket cost me two Benjis.”
  • A person talking about their savings might say, “I’m trying to save up enough to have a few Benjis in my emergency fund.”

31. Fiver

This term refers to a five-dollar bill, which features the image of Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States.

  • For example, “I only have a fiver, so I can’t buy that expensive item.”
  • When splitting a bill, someone might say, “Can you give me a fiver for your share?”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have change for a fiver? I only have a ten-dollar bill.”

32. Single

This slang term is used to refer to a one-dollar bill, the most common denomination of U.S. currency.

  • For instance, “I only have singles, so I can’t break your larger bill.”
  • When paying for something inexpensive, a person might say, “I’ll just give you a single.”
  • A cashier might ask, “Do you need any singles for your change?”

33. Abe

This slang term is derived from the first name of Abraham Lincoln, whose portrait appears on the one-dollar bill.

  • For example, “I need some Abe’s to tip the valet.”
  • When discussing currency, someone might say, “Abe’s are the most frequently used bills.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break an Abe? I only have a twenty-dollar bill.”

34. Washington

This term refers to the first President of the United States, George Washington, whose portrait is featured on the one-dollar bill.

  • For instance, “I only have Washingtons, so I can’t contribute much to the group gift.”
  • When discussing money, someone might say, “I need to save my Washingtons for a rainy day.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you give me some Washingtons for the parking meter?”

35. Dub

This slang term is used to refer to a twenty-dollar bill, which features a portrait of Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States.

  • For example, “I found a dub in my coat pocket!”
  • When discussing cash, someone might say, “I need to get some dubs from the ATM.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break a dub? I only have a fifty-dollar bill.”

36. Grant

This refers to the fifty-dollar bill featuring President Ulysses S. Grant. It is often used to refer to a fifty-dollar bill.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to break this Grant into smaller bills.”
  • In a conversation about money, a person might ask, “Do you have any Grants on you?”
  • A cashier might say, “Your total is $55, do you have a Grant to cover it?”

37. Franklin

This refers to the one-hundred dollar bill featuring Benjamin Franklin. It is often used to refer to a one-hundred dollar bill.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t believe I found a Franklin on the ground!”
  • In a discussion about expensive purchases, a person might say, “I dropped a Franklin on those shoes.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you break this Franklin for smaller bills?”

38. Stacks

This term refers to a large amount of money, typically in the form of bills. It implies a thick stack of bills.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s always walking around with stacks of cash.”
  • In a conversation about wealth, a person might ask, “How many stacks do you think he has?”
  • A person might boast, “I made a stack of money from that business deal.”

39. Bread

This term is used as a slang for money, particularly cash.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to make some bread to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “Do you have enough bread to cover the expenses?”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the ATM to withdraw some bread.”

40. Loot

This term is used as a slang for money, especially cash. It can also refer to stolen money or ill-gotten gains.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to save up some loot for my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about making money, a person might say, “I’m going to hustle and earn some loot.”
  • A person might joke, “I wish I had a bag of loot like Scrooge McDuck.”

41. Cheddar

This term is slang for money in general, not just specifically for dollar bills. It is derived from the fact that cheddar cheese is often yellow, similar to the color of some dollar bills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to earn some cheddar to pay my bills.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much cheddar do you have saved up?”
  • A rapper might boast, “I make it rain cheddar everywhere I go.”

42. Smacker

This term is a slang word for a dollar bill. It is often used in casual conversations or informal settings.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I only have a few smackers in my wallet.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of something, a person might say, “That’ll cost you a few smackers.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you lend me a smacker? I need to buy a drink.”

43. Double sawbuck

This term specifically refers to a twenty-dollar bill. It is derived from the fact that the Roman numeral for twenty is “XX,” which resembles two “X” shapes, or “sawbucks.”

  • For example, someone might say, “I found a double sawbuck on the ground!”
  • In a conversation about currency, a person might ask, “Do you have any double sawbucks on you?”
  • A cashier might say, “That’ll be two double sawbucks, please.”

44. Big ones

This term is a slang phrase for dollar bills. It is often used to refer to a large amount of money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve got a stack of big ones in my pocket.”
  • In a discussion about financial transactions, a person might ask, “Can you break a hundred into big ones?”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up all my big ones for a vacation.”

45. Paper

This term is a general slang word for money, including dollar bills. It is derived from the fact that money is often made of paper.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to go to the ATM and get some paper.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might ask, “How much paper do you have in your wallet?”
  • A person might say, “I’m always trying to make more paper.”

46. Wad

This term refers to a bundle of dollar bills, usually held together by a rubber band or folded. It can also be used to describe a large amount of money.

  • For example, “He pulled out a wad of cash to pay for dinner.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I need to save up a wad of money for my vacation.”
  • A person showing off their wealth might boast, “Check out this wad of cash I just won at the casino!”

47. Bankroll

This slang term refers to a person’s financial resources or the amount of money they have available for spending or investing. It can also refer to the act of financially supporting someone or something.

  • For instance, “He used his bankroll to start his own business.”
  • In a discussion about gambling, someone might say, “I lost my entire bankroll at the poker table.”
  • A person bragging about their wealth might say, “I’ve got a bankroll that could buy a small country!”

48. Cheese

This term is a slang word for money, often used to describe paper currency. It may have originated from the green color of American dollar bills.

  • For example, “I need to go to the ATM and get some cheese.”
  • In a conversation about paying for something, someone might say, “Do you have enough cheese to cover the bill?”
  • A person discussing their financial situation might say, “I’m running low on cheese this month.”

49. Dough

This term is a slang word for money, particularly referring to paper currency. It can also refer to the act of making money or earning a living.

  • For instance, “I need to stop by the bank and withdraw some dough.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might say, “I’m trying to save up enough dough to buy a new car.”
  • A person discussing their job might say, “I’m making decent dough at my new gig.”
See also  Top 20 Slang For Facetious – Meaning & Usage