Top 58 Slang For Down – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing feelings of low energy or a bit of a slump, we all need some words to capture that mood. “Slang For Down” is here to help you navigate the world of expressing those moments when you’re feeling a little less than upbeat. Whether you’re feeling blue or just need a term to sum up that down feeling, we’ve got you covered with a list that’s sure to resonate with many. So sit back, relax, and get ready to explore some new ways to describe those not-so-great days.

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1. Lowkey

This term is used to describe something that is not widely known or acknowledged. It can also mean keeping something quiet or not drawing attention to it.

  • For example, “I lowkey love this song, but don’t tell anyone.”
  • A person might say, “I’m lowkey excited for the weekend.”
  • Someone might comment, “She’s lowkey the funniest person I know.”

2. Chill

This word is used to describe a state of being calm, cool, and relaxed. It can also refer to a person who is easygoing and laid-back.

  • For instance, “Let’s just chill and watch a movie tonight.”
  • A friend might say, “You’re so chill, nothing ever seems to bother you.”
  • Someone might describe a party as, “It was a chill gathering with good vibes.”

3. Laid-back

This term is used to describe a person who is relaxed and calm, often in a social setting. It can also refer to a casual and relaxed attitude towards life.

  • For example, “He’s so laid-back, he never gets stressed about anything.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer a laid-back atmosphere when hanging out with friends.”
  • Someone might describe a vacation as, “It was a laid-back trip with no strict itinerary.”

4. Downtime

This word is used to describe a period of time when a person is not working or occupied with any tasks. It can also refer to a break or time for rest and relaxation.

  • For instance, “I need some downtime to recharge after a long week.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy having downtime to just do nothing and unwind.”
  • Someone might comment, “I like to use my downtime to catch up on my favorite TV shows.”

5. Take a breather

This phrase is used to suggest taking a short break or pause from an activity or situation. It can also mean to relax and take a moment to catch one’s breath.

  • For example, “Let’s take a breather and regroup before continuing.”
  • A person might say, “I need to take a breather and clear my mind.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Why don’t you take a breather and go for a walk to destress?”

6. Unwind

To relax or destress after a period of activity or stress.

  • For example, “I’m going to unwind with a hot bath and a good book.”
  • After a long day at work, someone might say, “I just want to unwind and watch some TV.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s go to the beach and unwind this weekend.”

7. Kick back

To relax and enjoy oneself without any worries or stress.

  • For instance, “I’m going to kick back and enjoy the weekend.”
  • On a vacation, someone might say, “Let’s just kick back and soak up the sun.”
  • After completing a big project, a coworker might suggest, “Why don’t we all kick back and celebrate?”

8. Cool off

To calm down or relax after a period of anger, frustration, or excitement.

  • For example, “Take a deep breath and cool off before you say something you’ll regret.”
  • After an argument, someone might say, “Let’s take a break and cool off before we continue.”
  • When feeling overwhelmed, a friend might advise, “Go for a walk outside to cool off and clear your mind.”

9. Hang loose

To relax, go with the flow, and not worry too much.

  • For instance, “Just hang loose and enjoy the moment.”
  • Before a party, someone might say, “Come on, hang loose and have fun.”
  • When faced with unexpected changes, a colleague might say, “Let’s hang loose and see how things unfold.”

10. Settle down

To calm down, become less agitated, or find a state of peace.

  • For example, “Take a deep breath and settle down before you make a decision.”
  • After a stressful event, someone might say, “I need some time to settle down and collect my thoughts.”
  • When feeling anxious, a therapist might suggest, “Try some relaxation techniques to help you settle down.”

11. Wind down

To unwind or relax after a period of intense activity or stress.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I like to wind down by taking a hot bath.”
  • A person might say, “I need some time to wind down before bed.”
  • Another might suggest, “Let’s wind down with a movie tonight.”

12. Mellow out

To become more relaxed or less agitated.

  • For instance, “I need to mellow out after that stressful meeting.”
  • A person might say, “Take a deep breath and mellow out.”
  • Another might suggest, “Listening to calming music can help you mellow out.”

13. Take it easy

To relax or not exert oneself too much.

  • For example, “It’s the weekend, time to take it easy.”
  • A person might say, “Take it easy, no need to rush.”
  • Another might suggest, “Let’s take it easy and enjoy the day.”

14. Decompress

To relax and release stress or tension.

  • For instance, “I need some time to decompress after a long day.”
  • A person might say, “I like to decompress by going for a walk.”
  • Another might suggest, “Find a quiet space to decompress and clear your mind.”

15. Take a load off

To relax or relieve oneself of stress or responsibility.

  • For example, “Sit down and take a load off.”
  • A person might say, “I need to take a load off and rest.”
  • Another might suggest, “Take a load off and enjoy some downtime.”

16. Ease up

This phrase is used to tell someone to calm down or to stop being so intense or aggressive. It can also mean to reduce or lessen the intensity of something.

  • For example, if someone is being too harsh in their criticism, you might say, “Hey, ease up a bit. They’re just trying their best.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might yell, “Ease up on the fouls, we don’t want to give them any free throws.”
  • If someone is being too pushy or demanding, you could say, “You need to ease up and give them some space.”

17. Slow down

This phrase is used to tell someone to decrease their speed or to take things more slowly. It can also mean to relax or to not rush through something.

  • For instance, if someone is driving too fast, you might say, “Hey, slow down! You’re going to get a ticket.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might advise, “You’re working too quickly, slow down and double-check your work.”
  • If someone is talking too fast or overwhelming you with information, you could say, “Can you please slow down? I’m having trouble keeping up.”

18. Cool it

This phrase is used to tell someone to calm down or to stop being so agitated or excited. It can also mean to relax or to not get too worked up about something.

  • For example, if someone is getting angry during an argument, you might say, “Hey, cool it. Let’s take a step back and talk calmly.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might say, “Everyone needs to cool it and let cooler heads prevail.”
  • If someone is getting overly enthusiastic or hyped up, you could say, “You need to cool it and remember to pace yourself.”

19. Level out

This phrase is used to describe the action of stabilizing or reaching a balanced or consistent state. It can also mean to bring something to a more manageable or predictable level.

  • For instance, if a plane is experiencing turbulence, the pilot might say, “Don’t worry, we’ll level out soon.”
  • In a business context, a manager might say, “We need to level out our expenses to stay within budget.”
  • If someone’s emotions or mood are fluctuating, you could say, “Take a deep breath and try to level out your emotions.”

20. Simmer down

This phrase is used to tell someone to calm down or to become less agitated or excited. It can also mean to reduce the intensity or enthusiasm of something.

  • For example, if a child is throwing a tantrum, you might say, “Simmer down and let’s talk about what’s bothering you.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Both of you need to simmer down and listen to each other.”
  • If someone is getting overly enthusiastic or carried away, you could say, “You need to simmer down and think more rationally.”

21. De-stress

This term means to take steps to reduce or eliminate stress and tension. It refers to activities or techniques that help someone unwind and calm down.

  • For example, “After a long day at work, I like to de-stress by taking a hot bath.”
  • Someone might suggest, “You should try yoga to de-stress and improve your flexibility.”
  • A friend might ask, “Want to de-stress together and watch a movie tonight?”

22. Take five

This phrase means to take a short break or pause from what one is doing. It is often used in reference to work or a task that requires focus and concentration.

  • For instance, a musician might say, “Let’s take five and grab a drink before we continue practicing.”
  • In a theater production, the director might say, “Take five, everyone. We’ll resume rehearsal in a few minutes.”
  • A coworker might suggest, “Feeling overwhelmed? Take five and go for a walk to clear your mind.”

23. Take a chill pill

This expression is used to tell someone to relax or calm down when they are feeling stressed, angry, or agitated.

  • For example, if someone is getting worked up over a small issue, a friend might say, “Hey, take a chill pill. It’s not worth getting so upset about.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Everyone needs to take a chill pill and approach this discussion with a level head.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Before you react, take a chill pill and think about the consequences.”

24. Bummed

This slang term is used to describe a feeling of sadness or disappointment. It is often used when someone is feeling let down or upset about a situation.

  • For instance, if someone’s plans were canceled last minute, they might say, “I’m really bummed about not being able to go to the concert.”
  • If someone receives bad news, they might express, “I’m feeling really bummed right now.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s got you so bummed lately? Is everything okay?”

25. Blue

This word is used to describe a feeling of sadness or depression. It is often used when someone is feeling down or experiencing a low mood.

  • For example, if someone is feeling down, they might say, “I’ve been feeling a bit blue lately.”
  • In a conversation about emotions, someone might share, “When I’m feeling blue, I like to listen to uplifting music.”
  • A friend might ask, “You seem a little blue today. Is there something on your mind?”

26. Dejected

When someone is dejected, they are feeling low and discouraged. It is a state of sadness and disappointment.

  • For example, “After failing the exam, she walked out of the classroom with a dejected expression.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s wrong? You seem dejected today.”
  • A coach might say to a player, “Don’t be dejected by the loss. Use it as motivation to improve.”

27. Gloomy

Gloomy is used to describe a person who is feeling down and lacking in happiness or optimism. It often refers to a dark or dismal mood.

  • For instance, “She’s been in a gloomy mood ever since her dog passed away.”
  • A weather forecast might say, “Tomorrow will be a gloomy day with clouds and rain.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why the gloomy face? Is something bothering you?”

28. Downtrodden

Downtrodden is used to describe someone who is oppressed, treated unfairly, or experiencing hardship. It often implies a sense of being helpless or defeated.

  • For example, “The downtrodden workers protested against their unfair working conditions.”
  • A news article might discuss, “The plight of the downtrodden in impoverished neighborhoods.”
  • A social worker might say, “We need to support and uplift the downtrodden in our society.”

29. Despondent

Despondent describes a state of extreme discouragement, hopelessness, or despair. It is a deep sadness and loss of motivation.

  • For instance, “He felt despondent after receiving multiple rejections for job applications.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling despondent about the state of the world right now.”
  • A therapist might work with a despondent client to help them regain hope and motivation.
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30. Melancholy

Melancholy is a profound and long-lasting sadness that often involves introspection and reflection. It is a state of deep sorrow and pensiveness.

  • For example, “She listened to sad music and embraced her melancholy.”
  • A poet might write, “In his melancholy state, he found solace in writing.”
  • A friend might ask, “Why the melancholy look? Is there something on your mind?”

31. Disheartened

Feeling discouraged or dispirited, often due to a setback or disappointment.

  • For example, “I felt disheartened when I didn’t get the job I interviewed for.”
  • A student might say, “I was disheartened when I failed my math test.”
  • In a sports context, a player might feel disheartened after losing an important game.

32. Depressed

Experiencing a persistent feeling of sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of interest or pleasure in activities.

  • For instance, “I’ve been feeling depressed lately and I don’t know why.”
  • A person might say, “Depression makes it difficult to find joy in things I used to enjoy.”
  • Someone might seek help by saying, “I think I may be depressed and need to talk to a therapist.”

33. Sullen

Having a sulky or moody demeanor, often characterized by a lack of responsiveness or enthusiasm.

  • For example, “He had a sullen expression on his face after the argument.”
  • A person might describe their mood by saying, “I’ve been feeling sullen and withdrawn lately.”
  • In a social setting, someone might comment, “She seemed sullen and didn’t engage in the conversation.”

34. Morose

Feeling gloomy, sullen, or ill-tempered, often accompanied by a lack of interest or enthusiasm.

  • For instance, “He appeared morose after receiving the bad news.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling morose lately and can’t seem to shake it off.”
  • In a discussion about emotions, someone might describe their state as, “I’m feeling morose and it’s affecting my daily life.”

35. Despairing

Feeling a deep sense of hopelessness or desperation, often due to a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For example, “She was despairing over her financial struggles.”
  • A person might say, “I feel despairing about the state of the world.”
  • In a support group, someone might share, “I’ve been feeling despairing lately and could use some encouragement.”

36. Deflated

When someone feels deflated, they are experiencing a sense of disappointment or loss of confidence. It can also refer to a decrease in energy or enthusiasm.

  • For example, after receiving a rejection letter, a job applicant might say, “I feel so deflated right now.”
  • A student who failed an important exam might express, “I studied so hard, but I’m feeling really deflated about my performance.”
  • A person who had high hopes for a project that didn’t turn out well might say, “I’m feeling deflated about the whole situation.”

37. Dismal

When something is described as dismal, it means it is characterized by a lack of hope, joy, or positive qualities. It can refer to a situation, place, or mood.

  • For instance, on a rainy day, someone might say, “The weather is so dismal, it’s putting me in a bad mood.”
  • A person who receives disappointing news might say, “I had such high expectations, but the outcome was dismal.”
  • A student who consistently receives low grades might express, “My academic performance has been dismal lately.”

38. Woeful

Woeful is used to describe something that is full of sorrow, sadness, or misery. It can also refer to something that is unfortunate or pitiful.

  • For example, after a breakup, someone might say, “I’m feeling woeful about the end of my relationship.”
  • A person who sees a neglected animal might comment, “It’s such a woeful sight to see a mistreated animal.”
  • A fan whose favorite sports team consistently loses might say, “It’s been a woeful season for our team.”

39. Glum

When someone is glum, they appear or feel sad, dejected, or gloomy. It is often used to describe someone’s facial expression or mood.

  • For instance, after receiving bad news, a person might say, “I’m feeling glum right now.”
  • A student who receives a poor grade on a test might express, “I walked out of the classroom feeling glum.”
  • A person who is going through a difficult time might say, “I’ve been feeling glum lately.”

40. Languishing

When someone is languishing, they are experiencing a lack of energy, motivation, or enthusiasm. It can also refer to a state of being neglected or ignored.

  • For example, after a long day at work, a person might say, “I’m feeling languishing and don’t have the energy to do anything.”
  • A student who has lost interest in their studies might express, “I’ve been languishing academically for a while now.”
  • A person whose talents are not being recognized might say, “I feel like I’m languishing in my career.”

41. Doleful

Doleful is an adjective that describes someone or something as being sad or mournful. It implies a deep and lingering sadness.

  • For example, “She had a doleful expression on her face after hearing the bad news.”
  • A person might describe their mood as doleful by saying, “I’ve been feeling doleful ever since the breakup.”
  • In a book or movie review, a critic might say, “The doleful ending left me feeling emotionally drained.”

42. Crestfallen

Crestfallen is an adjective that describes someone as being disappointed or dejected. It implies a loss of hope or enthusiasm.

  • For instance, “He looked crestfallen when he didn’t get the job he wanted.”
  • A person might describe their feelings after a failed project by saying, “I was left feeling crestfallen and defeated.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The team’s loss left their fans crestfallen and in disbelief.”

43. Sorrowful

Sorrowful is an adjective that describes someone or something as being full of sorrow or grief. It implies a deep and profound sadness.

  • For example, “The funeral was a sorrowful occasion.”
  • A person might describe their state of mind as sorrowful by saying, “I’ve been feeling sorrowful since the loss of a loved one.”
  • In a poem or song, the lyrics might evoke a sorrowful tone by describing heartbreak or loss.
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44. Unhappy

Unhappy is an adjective that describes someone as not being pleased or satisfied. It implies a general sense of discontent or dissatisfaction.

  • For instance, “She seemed unhappy with the dinner she was served.”
  • A person might describe their overall mood as unhappy by saying, “I’ve been feeling unhappy lately and can’t pinpoint why.”
  • In a customer review, someone might say, “I was unhappy with the quality of the product I received.”

45. Mournful

Mournful is an adjective that describes someone or something as being full of mourning or grief. It implies a deep and heartfelt sorrow.

  • For example, “The mournful wails at the funeral were heart-wrenching.”
  • A person might describe their state of mind as mournful by saying, “I’ve been feeling mournful since the loss of my pet.”
  • In a sad scene in a movie or TV show, the background music might be mournful to enhance the emotional impact.

46. Downhearted

This term describes a feeling of sadness or discouragement. It is often used to convey a temporary state of being down or feeling low.

  • For example, “After failing the exam, he felt downhearted and unsure of his abilities.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been feeling downhearted ever since my pet passed away.”
  • In a conversation about a disappointing event, someone might express, “I was really downhearted when my favorite team lost the game.”

47. Desolate

This word describes a feeling of emptiness or loneliness. It is often used to convey a sense of isolation or abandonment.

  • For instance, “Walking through the abandoned town, he couldn’t help but feel desolate.”
  • A person might say, “After the breakup, I felt desolate and alone.”
  • In a discussion about a desolate landscape, someone might comment, “The barren desert was desolate and devoid of life.”

48. Forlorn

This term describes a feeling of being abandoned or without hope. It is often used to convey a sense of sadness or despair.

  • For example, “She sat in the corner, looking forlorn and lost.”
  • A person might say, “I felt forlorn after receiving the rejection letter.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might express, “I’m feeling forlorn and don’t know what to do.”

49. Melancholic

This word describes a feeling of sadness or gloominess. It is often used to convey a deep or prolonged state of sadness.

  • For instance, “The rainy weather made her feel melancholic and reflective.”
  • A person might say, “I often find myself in a melancholic mood during the winter.”
  • In a discussion about a melancholic song, someone might comment, “The haunting melody and lyrics evoke a sense of melancholy.”

50. Disconsolate

This term describes a feeling of extreme sadness or dejection. It is often used to convey a state of being inconsolable or without comfort.

  • For example, “After the loss of a loved one, he was disconsolate and couldn’t find solace.”
  • A person might say, “I felt disconsolate after failing to achieve my lifelong dream.”
  • In a conversation about a devastating event, someone might express, “The victims’ families were left disconsolate and heartbroken.”

51. Down and out

This phrase is used to describe someone who is in a state of extreme poverty or financial hardship.

  • For example, “After losing his job, he became down and out and had to rely on food banks for meals.”
  • In a discussion about homelessness, someone might say, “Many people on the streets are down and out due to circumstances beyond their control.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I was down and out for a while, but with hard work and determination, I was able to turn my life around.”

52. Downbeat

This term is used to describe someone who is feeling low or experiencing sadness or depression.

  • For instance, “She had a downbeat expression on her face after receiving bad news.”
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might say, “I’ve been feeling downbeat lately and could use some support.”
  • A person sharing their emotions might say, “I can’t shake this downbeat feeling no matter what I do.”

53. Downcast

This word is used to describe someone who is feeling discouraged or lacking in confidence.

  • For example, “His downcast expression showed that he had lost hope.”
  • In a discussion about setbacks, someone might say, “It’s natural to feel downcast after facing a major disappointment.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was initially downcast, but I used that setback as motivation to work harder.”

54. Moody

This term is used to describe someone who has unpredictable or volatile emotions.

  • For instance, “She’s been acting moody lately, snapping at everyone for no reason.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Dealing with a moody partner can be challenging.”
  • A person describing their own mood swings might say, “I can be quite moody at times, but I’m working on managing my emotions better.”

55. Funk

This word is used to describe a state of feeling low or lacking motivation or energy.

  • For example, “She’s been in a funk ever since her pet passed away.”
  • In a discussion about productivity, someone might say, “I’ve been in a funk lately and struggling to get things done.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was in a funk for weeks, but a change of scenery helped lift my spirits.”

56. Pessimistic

This term refers to a person who consistently expects the worst outcome in any situation. A pessimistic individual tends to have a negative outlook on life and often anticipates failure or disappointment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m feeling pessimistic about my chances of getting that job.”
  • In a discussion about future plans, a person might comment, “I hate to be pessimistic, but I don’t think things will work out.”
  • A friend might try to cheer up a pessimistic person by saying, “Don’t be so pessimistic! There’s always a chance things will turn out better than you expect.”

57. Wistful

This term describes a feeling of longing or nostalgia for something in the past. It often involves a mix of sadness and pleasure, as the person reminisces about something they desire or miss.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel wistful when I think about my childhood summers.”
  • In a conversation about a lost love, someone might say, “I still get wistful when I see photos of us together.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Feeling wistful today, thinking about the good old days.”

58. Heavy-hearted

This term describes a state of deep sadness or sorrow. When someone is heavy-hearted, they carry a heavy emotional burden, often due to a loss, disappointment, or difficult situation.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m feeling heavy-hearted after the passing of a loved one.”
  • In a discussion about personal struggles, someone might say, “I’ve been heavy-hearted ever since I lost my job.”
  • A friend might offer support by saying, “I can see that you’re heavy-hearted. I’m here for you if you need to talk.”