Top 40 Slang For Drunk – Meaning & Usage

We’ve all been there – those nights when the drinks are flowing and the good times are rolling. But how do you describe that feeling of being a little tipsy or totally wasted? Look no further! We’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang words for drunk. Whether you’re looking to expand your vocabulary or just want a good laugh, this listicle is sure to have you raising your glass and saying, “Cheers!”

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1. Hammered

This term is used to describe someone who is very drunk. It implies that the person’s level of intoxication is so high that they may not be able to function properly.

  • For example, “After the party, John was completely hammered and couldn’t walk straight.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go out and get hammered tonight!”
  • Someone might describe their night by saying, “I got hammered last night and don’t remember anything.”

2. Wasted

This word is used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated, often to the point of being unable to control their actions or make coherent decisions.

  • For instance, “She was so wasted at the party that she couldn’t even stand.”
  • A person might say, “I got completely wasted last night and woke up with a hangover.”
  • Someone might warn a friend, “Be careful not to get too wasted tonight.”

3. Smashed

This slang term is used to describe someone who is very drunk. It implies a level of intoxication that goes beyond just being tipsy or buzzed.

  • For example, “We went out and got smashed at the club last night.”
  • A person might say, “I was so smashed that I couldn’t even remember how I got home.”
  • Someone might describe their night by saying, “We were all smashed after the third round of shots.”

4. Plastered

This word is used to describe someone who is extremely drunk, to the point of being unable to function or think clearly. It suggests that the person is “stuck” to a wall or surface, unable to move.

  • For instance, “He got completely plastered at the party and ended up passing out on the couch.”
  • A person might say, “I was so plastered last night that I don’t even remember getting home.”
  • Someone might warn a friend, “Don’t get too plastered tonight or you’ll regret it in the morning.”

5. Sloshed

This term is used to describe someone who is mildly drunk, but not to the point of being heavily intoxicated. It suggests a state of being slightly unsteady or off-balance.

  • For example, “After a few drinks, she started feeling sloshed.”
  • A person might say, “I was feeling a little sloshed after the party, but nothing too extreme.”
  • Someone might describe their night by saying, “We had a few beers and got a bit sloshed, but we were still able to have a good time.”

6. Blitzed

This term refers to being heavily intoxicated, often to the point of being unable to function properly. It implies a state of complete drunkenness.

  • For example, “After a night of partying, he was completely blitzed and couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • A friend might comment, “I got completely blitzed at the bar last night and don’t remember anything.”
  • In a story about a wild night out, someone might say, “We all got blitzed and ended up dancing on tables.”

7. Tipsy

Being tipsy means being slightly drunk or intoxicated. It refers to a state of mild inebriation where one’s coordination and judgment may be slightly impaired.

  • For instance, “After a few drinks, she started feeling tipsy and giggly.”
  • Someone might say, “I enjoy being tipsy because it helps me relax and have a good time.”
  • In a conversation about alcohol, a person might mention, “I don’t like getting drunk, but I don’t mind getting a little tipsy.”

8. Buzzed

Similar to being tipsy, being buzzed means being slightly drunk or intoxicated. It implies a state of mild inebriation where one feels a pleasant buzz or euphoria.

  • For example, “After a couple of beers, he started feeling buzzed and more sociable.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to stay buzzed rather than getting completely drunk.”
  • In a discussion about drinking, someone might comment, “I enjoy the buzzed feeling without going overboard.”

9. Tanked

Being tanked means being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of extreme drunkenness where one’s behavior and motor skills are significantly impaired.

  • For instance, “He went out with the intention of getting tanked and ended up making a fool of himself.”
  • A friend might say, “I got so tanked last night that I couldn’t even find my way home.”
  • In a story about a wild party, someone might mention, “Everyone was completely tanked and dancing like crazy.”

10. Trashed

Being trashed means being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of extreme drunkenness where one is completely out of control and may engage in reckless behavior.

  • For example, “She got trashed at the club and ended up getting into a fight.”
  • A person might say, “I regret the times when I got trashed and did things I shouldn’t have.”
  • In a conversation about partying, someone might comment, “Let’s get trashed tonight and have a wild time!”

11. Soused

This slang term refers to someone who is heavily intoxicated or drunk. It implies a state of being completely soaked or saturated with alcohol.

  • For example, “After downing several shots, he was completely soused.”
  • In a party setting, someone might say, “Let’s get soused and have a great time!”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “You were so soused last night, you couldn’t even walk straight!”

12. Blotto

This slang term is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or drunk, to the point of being unable to function properly.

  • For instance, “He had too much to drink and ended up blotto.”
  • In a humorous context, someone might say, “I went to the party and got blottoed!”
  • A person might comment, “I don’t remember anything from last night, I was completely blotto.”

13. Litty

This slang term combines “lit” (meaning exciting or excellent) with “itty” (a diminutive suffix) to describe someone who is drunk and having a great time.

  • For example, “The party was litty, everyone was dancing and drinking.”
  • In a social media caption, someone might write, “Feeling litty after a night out with friends!”
  • A person might say, “Let’s hit the club and get litty tonight!”

14. Three sheets to the wind

This phrase originated from sailing terminology, where “sheets” are the ropes that control the sails. If three sheets are loose and blowing in the wind, a ship becomes unsteady, much like a person who is extremely drunk.

  • For instance, “After consuming a bottle of whiskey, he was three sheets to the wind.”
  • In a conversation about a wild night, someone might say, “We were all three sheets to the wind by the end of the party.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “You were so drunk last night, you were three sheets to the wind!”

15. Inebriated

This term is a more formal way to describe someone who is under the influence of alcohol and impaired due to drinking.

  • For example, “He was clearly inebriated after consuming several cocktails.”
  • In a cautionary context, someone might say, “Don’t drive when you’re inebriated.”
  • A person might comment, “I felt inebriated after just one glass of wine.”

16. Juiced

This slang term refers to being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It is often used to describe someone who has consumed a large amount of alcohol.

  • For example, “After a night of heavy drinking, he was completely juiced.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go out and get juiced tonight!”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t believe how juiced he got at the party last night.”

17. Pickled

This slang term is used to describe someone who is intoxicated or drunk. It refers to the state of being heavily under the influence of alcohol.

  • For instance, “He went out and got completely pickled last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to get pickled at the bar tonight.”
  • Someone might comment, “She was so pickled that she couldn’t even walk straight.”

18. Sauced

This slang term means to be drunk or intoxicated. It is often used to describe someone who has consumed a significant amount of alcohol.

  • For example, “He was so sauced that he couldn’t even remember his own name.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go out and get sauced tonight!”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t believe how sauced she got at the party last night.”

19. Zonked

This slang term is used to describe someone who is extremely intoxicated or drunk. It signifies a state of being heavily under the influence of alcohol.

  • For instance, “After a night of partying, he was completely zonked.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to get zonked at the club tonight.”
  • Someone might comment, “She was so zonked that she passed out on the couch.”

20. Loaded

This slang term means to be drunk or intoxicated. It refers to the state of being heavily under the influence of alcohol.

  • For example, “He went to the party and got completely loaded.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go out and get loaded tonight!”
  • Someone might comment, “I can’t believe how loaded he was at the bar last night.”

21. Ripped

This term refers to being heavily under the influence of alcohol. It implies a state of extreme drunkenness.

  • For example, “After a night of partying, he was completely ripped.”
  • A friend might say, “I got so ripped last night, I don’t even remember what happened.”
  • Someone might comment, “She was dancing on the tables, totally ripped.”

22. Clobbered

To be clobbered means to be very drunk or intoxicated. It suggests a state of being completely overwhelmed by alcohol.

  • For instance, “He went out for a few drinks and came back clobbered.”
  • A person might say, “I got clobbered at the bar last night and had to call a cab.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you sure you want to drive? You look clobbered.”

23. Blasted

Being blasted is another way to describe being extremely intoxicated. It implies a state of being completely wasted or out of control due to alcohol.

  • For example, “He got blasted at the party and couldn’t even walk straight.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go out and get blasted tonight!”
  • Someone might comment, “She was so blasted, she couldn’t even remember her own name.”

24. Plowed

To be plowed means to be heavily intoxicated or drunk. It suggests a state of being completely overwhelmed by alcohol.

  • For instance, “He went to the bar and got plowed.”
  • A person might say, “I got plowed last night and woke up with a terrible hangover.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you remember what happened last night? You were totally plowed.”

25. Blazed

Blazed is a slang term for being drunk or intoxicated. It can also refer to being under the influence of drugs.

  • For example, “He got blazed at the party and couldn’t stop laughing.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s get blazed and watch some movies.”
  • Someone might comment, “She was so blazed, she couldn’t even form a coherent sentence.”

26. Lush

A “lush” is a person who drinks alcohol to excess or frequently. It is often used to describe someone who is a habitual or heavy drinker.

  • For example, “He’s such a lush, he’s always at the bar.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t keep up with her, she’s a total lush.”
  • Someone might comment, “I used to be a lush, but now I’ve cut back on drinking.”

27. Stewed

Being “stewed” refers to being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It is a slang term often used to describe someone who has consumed a significant amount of alcohol.

  • For instance, “After a night of partying, he was completely stewed.”
  • A person might say, “I got so stewed last night, I don’t even remember what happened.”
  • Another might comment, “She was already stewed when she arrived at the party.”

28. Canned

To be “canned” means to be drunk or intoxicated. It is a slang term commonly used to describe someone who has consumed alcohol to the point of impairment.

  • For example, “He got completely canned at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to get canned tonight and have a good time.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s always getting canned on the weekends.”

29. Sloppy drunk

Being a “sloppy drunk” refers to being extremely intoxicated or drunk to the point of being unable to control one’s actions or behavior. It implies a lack of coordination and self-awareness.

  • For instance, “She was a sloppy drunk and kept stumbling around.”
  • A friend might say, “He’s always a sloppy drunk at parties, it’s embarrassing.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’ve never seen anyone as sloppy drunk as she was last night.”

30. Hooched up

To be “hooched up” means to be heavily intoxicated or drunk. It is a slang term often used to describe someone who has consumed a large amount of alcohol.

  • For example, “He went out and got hooched up with his friends.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t remember what happened last night, I was hooched up.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s always getting hooched up on the weekends.”

31. Lit

When someone is “lit,” it means they are heavily intoxicated or drunk. This term is often used to describe someone who is having a great time while under the influence.

  • For example, “After a few shots, he was completely lit.”
  • At a party, someone might say, “Let’s get lit tonight!”
  • A friend might comment, “She was so lit last night, she couldn’t even walk straight.”

32. Tanked up

To be “tanked up” means to be heavily drunk. It implies that someone has consumed a large amount of alcohol and is in a state of intoxication.

  • For instance, “He got so tanked up at the party, he couldn’t remember anything the next day.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m planning to get tanked up tonight, wanna join?”
  • After a night of heavy drinking, someone might comment, “I’m never getting tanked up like that again.”

33. Zonked out

When someone is “zonked out,” it means they are completely drunk or in a state of extreme intoxication. This term suggests that the person is so drunk that they are barely conscious or functioning properly.

  • For example, “He was zonked out on the couch after drinking all night.”
  • A friend might say, “I can’t believe how zonked out she was last night.”
  • After a wild party, someone might exclaim, “We all ended up zonked out on the floor!”

34. Juiced up

To be “juiced up” means to be intoxicated or drunk. This term suggests that someone has consumed enough alcohol to reach a state of inebriation.

  • For instance, “He was juiced up and acting crazy at the bar.”
  • A friend might comment, “I can’t believe how juiced up she gets every weekend.”
  • After a night of heavy drinking, someone might say, “I’m feeling a little juiced up, time to call it a night.”

35. Sauced up

When someone is “sauced up,” it means they are heavily drunk or intoxicated. This term implies that the person has consumed a significant amount of alcohol and is in a state of inebriation.

  • For example, “He was sauced up and stumbling around the party.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go get sauced up tonight!”
  • After a night of drinking, someone might admit, “I got completely sauced up last night, I don’t even remember how I got home.”

36. Boozed up

This term refers to being heavily under the influence of alcohol. It suggests that someone has consumed a significant amount of alcohol and is now drunk.

  • For example, “After a night of partying, he was completely boozed up.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go get boozed up at the bar tonight.”
  • Someone might describe their state by saying, “I got a little boozed up at the wedding reception last night.”

37. Tipsy-turvy

This phrase describes a state of being slightly drunk or under the influence of alcohol. It suggests a feeling of unsteadiness or imbalance due to alcohol consumption.

  • For instance, “After a few drinks, she started feeling tipsy-turvy.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to get too tipsy-turvy, just a little buzzed.”
  • Someone might describe their experience by saying, “The room started spinning, and I knew I was tipsy-turvy.”

38. Buzzed like a bee

This phrase implies a light level of intoxication, similar to feeling a buzz from alcohol. It suggests that someone has consumed enough alcohol to feel its effects, but not to the point of being heavily drunk.

  • For example, “After a couple of beers, he was buzzing like a bee.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m just looking to get buzzed like a bee tonight.”
  • Someone might describe their state by saying, “I had a few cocktails, and now I’m feeling buzzed like a bee.”

39. Tore up

This term describes a state of being heavily intoxicated or drunk. It suggests that someone has consumed a large amount of alcohol and is now in a state of disarray or chaos.

  • For instance, “He got completely tore up at the party last night.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t remember anything from last night, I was so tore up.”
  • Someone might describe their experience by saying, “I woke up this morning feeling absolutely tore up.”

40. Baked

This slang term refers to being heavily under the influence of alcohol. It suggests that someone has consumed a significant amount of alcohol and is now very drunk.

  • For example, “After a night of drinking, he was completely baked.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go get baked tonight and have a wild time.”
  • Someone might describe their state by saying, “I can’t believe how baked I got at the party last night.”
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