Top 72 Slang For Dubious – Meaning & Usage

Dubious situations are a common occurrence in today’s fast-paced world, but navigating through them can be quite a challenge. Fear not, as we’ve got your back! Our team has meticulously curated a list of the most popular and up-to-date slang for dubious scenarios. Get ready to level up your street smarts and stay ahead of the game with our comprehensive guide.

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1. Sketchy

This term is used to describe something or someone that seems questionable or unreliable.

  • For example, “That guy selling watches out of his van seems really sketchy.”
  • If a friend suggests a shady business deal, you might say, “That sounds a bit sketchy to me.”
  • When someone tells an unbelievable story, you might respond with, “That sounds sketchy. Are you sure it’s true?”

2. Shady

This word is often used to describe someone or something that is involved in illegal or unethical activities.

  • For instance, “I wouldn’t trust that shady character hanging out by the alley.”
  • If someone is acting suspiciously, you might say, “There’s something shady about his behavior.”
  • When discussing a business opportunity, you might warn others by saying, “Be careful, it seems a bit shady to me.”

3. Fishy

This slang term is used to describe something that seems suspicious or doubtful.

  • For example, “Her story about winning the lottery sounds fishy to me.”
  • If someone offers you a deal that seems too good to be true, you might say, “Something seems fishy about this.”
  • When a friend cancels plans at the last minute with a vague excuse, you might think, “That’s fishy. I wonder what’s really going on.”

4. Dodgy

This term is commonly used in British slang to describe something or someone that is questionable or suspicious.

  • For instance, “I wouldn’t buy anything from that dodgy website.”
  • If someone suggests a plan that seems risky, you might say, “That sounds a bit dodgy to me.”
  • When describing a person with a history of dishonesty, you might say, “He’s a dodgy character. Don’t trust him.”

5. Questionable

This word is used to describe something that raises doubts or uncertainties.

  • For example, “The company’s financial practices are questionable.”
  • If a friend recommends a product with mixed reviews, you might say, “The quality seems questionable.”
  • When discussing a controversial decision, you might say, “The ethics of that choice are highly questionable.”

6. Dicey

This term is used to describe something that is uncertain or potentially dangerous. It implies a sense of caution or skepticism.

  • For example, “The weather forecast looks dicey, so we should bring umbrellas.”
  • In a discussion about a business deal, someone might say, “The terms of the contract seem a bit dicey.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful, that neighborhood is known for being dicey at night.”

7. Hinky

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that seems suspicious or questionable. It implies a sense of unease or distrust.

  • For instance, “There’s something hinky about his story, I don’t believe him.”
  • In a conversation about a new acquaintance, someone might say, “I get a hinky feeling about that person.”
  • A detective might describe a crime scene as “hinky” if it doesn’t add up.

8. Sus

An abbreviation of “suspicious,” this term is used to describe something or someone that seems questionable or untrustworthy. It is often used in online communication or text messages.

  • For example, “That website looks sus, I wouldn’t trust it.”
  • In a discussion about a person’s behavior, someone might say, “He’s been acting really sus lately.”
  • A user might comment on a social media post, “This seems sus, I wouldn’t click on the link.”

9. Uncertain

This term describes something that is not definite or reliable. It implies a lack of confidence or clarity.

  • For instance, “The outcome of the game is uncertain, it could go either way.”
  • In a conversation about future plans, someone might say, “I’m still uncertain about what I want to do.”
  • A person might express uncertainty about a decision by saying, “I’m feeling uncertain about whether to take the job offer.”

10. Untrustworthy

This term describes something or someone that is not deserving of trust. It implies a lack of reliability or honesty.

  • For example, “He seems untrustworthy, I wouldn’t confide in him.”
  • In a discussion about a product, someone might say, “The company has a reputation for being untrustworthy.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Be careful, she’s known to be untrustworthy.”

11. Debatable

This word is used to describe something that is open to discussion or dispute. It suggests that there are differing opinions or arguments regarding the topic.

  • For example, in a political debate, one might say, “The effectiveness of this policy is debatable.”
  • A person discussing a controversial topic might state, “The ethical implications of this issue are debatable.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might comment, “The quality of the film is debatable among critics and audiences alike.”

12. Dubious

This term is used to express doubt or uncertainty about something. It implies that there are reasons to be skeptical or wary of the subject at hand.

  • For instance, if someone makes an unbelievable claim, one might respond, “That sounds dubious.”
  • In a discussion about a product’s effectiveness, someone might say, “The claims made by the company seem dubious.”
  • A person might express doubt by stating, “I find the evidence presented to be dubious.”

13. Unreliable

This word is used to describe something or someone that cannot be relied upon or trusted. It suggests that the subject is not consistent or dependable.

  • For example, if a person consistently fails to keep their promises, one might describe them as unreliable.
  • In a discussion about a news source, someone might say, “That website is known for publishing unreliable information.”
  • A person might warn others by stating, “Be careful, that source is unreliable.”

14. Skeptical

This term is used to describe a state of doubt or questioning. It suggests that one is hesitant to accept something without further evidence or proof.

  • For instance, in a discussion about a new scientific discovery, one might say, “Scientists are skeptical until the results are replicated.”
  • If someone makes a bold claim, another person might respond by saying, “I’m skeptical about that.”
  • A person might express their skepticism by stating, “I need more information before I can believe that.”

15. Not kosher

This phrase is used to describe something that is not right or acceptable. It is often used to imply that there may be something dishonest or questionable about the subject.

  • For example, if a person suspects foul play in a business transaction, they might say, “Something about this deal is not kosher.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious activity, someone might comment, “That behavior seems really not kosher.”
  • A person might express their suspicion by stating, “I have a feeling that this situation is not kosher.”

16. Queer

This term is often used to describe something or someone that seems suspicious or questionable. It can also be used to refer to something that is strange or odd.

  • For example, “There’s something queer about that guy, I don’t trust him.”
  • In a discussion about a suspicious situation, someone might say, “Things are getting queer around here, we should be careful.”
  • Another usage could be, “That’s a queer-looking package, I wouldn’t open it.”

17. Wobbly

When something or someone is described as wobbly, it means they are unsteady or uncertain. It can also be used to describe a situation that is unstable or unpredictable.

  • For instance, “He walked out of the bar feeling a bit wobbly.”
  • In a conversation about a shaky plan, someone might say, “I’m not sure about this, it seems a bit wobbly.”
  • Another usage could be, “The economy is looking wobbly, we should be prepared for potential problems.”

18. Fuzzy

When something is described as fuzzy, it means it is unclear or ambiguous. It can also be used to refer to a person’s memory or understanding that is not clear or precise.

  • For example, “The details of the contract are a bit fuzzy, I need clarification.”
  • In a discussion about a vague concept, someone might say, “The definition of success is fuzzy, it means different things to different people.”
  • Another usage could be, “I have a fuzzy memory of that event, it’s hard to recall the details.”

19. Shifty

When someone or something is described as shifty, it means they are dishonest or evasive. It can also be used to describe a person’s behavior that is suspicious or untrustworthy.

  • For instance, “I don’t trust that shifty-looking character, he seems up to no good.”
  • In a conversation about someone avoiding questions, someone might say, “He’s being shifty, he won’t give a straight answer.”
  • Another usage could be, “The salesman had a shifty demeanor, I didn’t feel comfortable doing business with him.”

20. Crooked

When something or someone is described as crooked, it means they are dishonest or corrupt. It can also be used to describe a situation that is unfair or rigged.

  • For example, “That politician is known for his crooked ways, he’s involved in numerous scandals.”
  • In a discussion about a rigged system, someone might say, “The game is crooked, it’s impossible to win fair and square.”
  • Another usage could be, “The company’s accounting practices were found to be crooked, leading to an investigation.”

21. Underhand

This term refers to actions or behavior that is dishonest, sneaky, or done in a secretive manner. It implies a lack of fairness or integrity.

  • For example, “He used underhand tactics to win the competition.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The underhand dealings of the government are concerning.”
  • A person might warn, “Be careful of people who have a history of underhand behavior.”

22. Sneaky

This slang term describes someone or something that is sly, deceitful, or untrustworthy. It suggests a sense of stealth and cleverness in achieving dubious goals.

  • For instance, “She pulled off a sneaky move to get what she wanted.”
  • In a conversation about pranks, someone might say, “That was a really sneaky trick you played on me.”
  • A person might warn, “Watch out for sneaky individuals who try to take advantage of others.”

23. Suss

This term is often used to describe the act of investigating or scrutinizing something or someone suspicious. It implies a need to gather more information or figure out the truth.

  • For example, “I need to suss out the situation before making a decision.”
  • In a discussion about a potential scam, someone might say, “I’m going to suss out the legitimacy of this offer.”
  • A person might advise, “Always suss out a person’s background before trusting them.”

24. Unscrupulous

This word describes someone or something that lacks moral principles or behaves in a dishonest or unethical manner. It suggests a disregard for what is right or fair.

  • For instance, “He engaged in unscrupulous business practices to get ahead.”
  • In a conversation about corrupt politicians, someone might say, “They are known for their unscrupulous behavior.”
  • A person might warn, “Beware of unscrupulous individuals who will do anything for personal gain.”

25. Rotten

This slang term describes someone or something that is morally corrupt, dishonest, or unreliable. It implies a state of decay or deterioration in terms of character or behavior.

  • For example, “He’s a rotten person who can’t be trusted.”
  • In a discussion about a dishonest business, someone might say, “That company is rotten to the core.”
  • A person might caution, “Stay away from people with a rotten reputation.”

26. Slimy

This term is used to describe someone or something that is shady, dishonest, or untrustworthy. It implies a lack of integrity or moral character.

  • For example, “I don’t trust that slimy used car salesman.”
  • A person might say, “The way he lied to his friends was really slimy.”
  • Another might comment, “The company’s slimy business practices are unethical.”

27. Two-faced

This slang term refers to someone who is deceitful or hypocritical, showing one face to some people and another face to others. It implies a lack of sincerity or genuineness.

  • For instance, “I thought she was my friend, but she turned out to be two-faced.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t trust him; he’s known for being two-faced.”
  • Another might comment, “Her two-faced behavior is causing a lot of drama in our group.”

28. Swindling

This word is used to describe the act of cheating or defrauding someone, typically for personal gain. It implies a dishonest or deceptive action.

  • For example, “He was arrested for swindling elderly people out of their life savings.”
  • A person might say, “Be careful with online purchases; there are many swindling scams out there.”
  • Another might comment, “The company’s swindling tactics led to a class-action lawsuit.”

29. Scammy

This slang term is used to describe something that has the characteristics or qualities of a scam. It implies a suspicious or fraudulent nature.

  • For instance, “I received an email that looked really scammy; I didn’t click on any links.”
  • A person might say, “That website seems scammy; I wouldn’t enter any personal information.”
  • Another might comment, “The offer seemed too good to be true, so I suspected it was scammy.”

30. Janky

This slang term is used to describe something that is unreliable, of poor quality, or in a state of disrepair. It implies a lack of trustworthiness or dependability.

  • For example, “I bought a janky phone that keeps freezing.”
  • A person might say, “That car looks janky; I wouldn’t buy it.”
  • Another might comment, “The website’s janky design made it difficult to navigate.”

31. Flaky

This term is used to describe someone who is inconsistent or unreliable. It can also refer to something that is unreliable or not trustworthy.

  • For example, “He said he would meet me for lunch, but he’s so flaky, I doubt he’ll show up.”
  • A person might say, “The weather forecast is flaky today, so it’s hard to plan any outdoor activities.”
  • Another might comment, “I don’t trust that website, their information seems flaky.”

32. Bogus

This word is used to describe something that is fake, false, or not genuine. It can also refer to a person or their behavior that is deceptive or dishonest.

  • For instance, “That website is selling bogus products, don’t buy anything from them.”
  • A person might say, “His excuse for being late is totally bogus, I know he’s lying.”
  • Another might comment, “The company’s claims about their product are bogus, they’re just trying to deceive customers.”

33. Phony

This term is used to describe something or someone that is fake, fraudulent, or not genuine. It can also refer to behavior that is deceptive or insincere.

  • For example, “She put on a phony smile, but I could tell she was upset.”
  • A person might say, “That email asking for your personal information is definitely phony, it’s a scam.”
  • Another might comment, “His story about being a millionaire is phony, he’s just trying to impress people.”

34. Charlatan

This word is used to describe a person who pretends to have knowledge or skills they do not possess, often with the intent to deceive or defraud others.

  • For instance, “He claimed to be a doctor, but he was exposed as a charlatan.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t trust that self-proclaimed psychic, she’s just a charlatan.”
  • Another might comment, “The con artist posed as a financial advisor, but he turned out to be a charlatan.”

35. Con artist

This term is used to describe a person who deceives or tricks others, often for personal gain. A con artist is skilled at manipulating and exploiting people’s trust.

  • For example, “The con artist convinced her to invest in a fake business and then disappeared with her money.”
  • A person might say, “Be wary of anyone offering you a deal that seems too good to be true, they could be a con artist.”
  • Another might comment, “The con artist used a variety of tactics to gain the trust of his victims before swindling them.”

36. Snake oil salesman

This term refers to someone who sells fraudulent or ineffective products, often making false claims about their benefits or effectiveness. The term originated from the 19th-century practice of selling fake remedies made from snake oil.

  • For example, “Don’t believe that snake oil salesman’s claims about his miracle cure.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might say, “Watch out for those snake oil salesmen trying to sell you bogus products.”
  • Another might warn, “Be skeptical of any salesperson who sounds too good to be true.”

37. Quack

This term is used to describe someone who pretends to be a qualified medical professional but lacks the necessary credentials or expertise. It can also refer to someone who promotes or sells ineffective medical treatments.

  • For instance, “Don’t trust that quack with your health, go see a real doctor.”
  • In a conversation about alternative medicine, someone might say, “There are legitimate treatments out there, but be cautious of quacks trying to sell you false hope.”
  • Another might comment, “Quacks often prey on vulnerable individuals who are desperate for a cure.”

38. Hoax

A hoax is a deliberate attempt to deceive or trick people into believing something that is not true. It can take the form of a false news story, a prank, or a fabricated event.

  • For example, “That viral video turned out to be a hoax, it was all staged.”
  • In a discussion about internet rumors, someone might say, “Always fact-check before sharing news online to avoid spreading hoaxes.”
  • Another might warn, “Be skeptical of sensational headlines, they might be part of a hoax.”

39. Con job

This term refers to a fraudulent scheme or deception designed to trick or deceive someone out of their money or belongings. It can involve various tactics, such as false promises, misrepresentation, or manipulation.

  • For instance, “He fell victim to a con job and lost all his savings.”
  • In a conversation about online scams, someone might say, “Be careful not to fall for any con jobs, always verify the legitimacy of offers.”
  • Another might advise, “If something seems too good to be true, it’s probably a con job.”

40. Rip-off

A rip-off refers to a situation where someone is charged an excessive or unfair price for a product or service. It can also describe a deal or transaction that is unfavorable or disadvantageous to one party.

  • For example, “That restaurant charges $20 for a basic sandwich, what a rip-off.”
  • In a discussion about consumer rights, someone might say, “We need stronger regulations to protect consumers from rip-offs.”
  • Another might complain, “I bought this product online and it turned out to be a complete rip-off.”

41. Scam

A fraudulent scheme or operation designed to deceive or cheat someone, often resulting in financial loss. The term “scam” is commonly used to describe fraudulent activities or schemes.

  • For example, “He fell victim to an online scam and lost all his savings.”
  • A person warning others might say, “Be careful of that website, it’s a scam.”
  • In a discussion about financial scams, someone might mention, “Ponzi schemes are one of the most notorious types of scams.”

42. Fraudulent

This term describes something that is dishonest or intended to deceive or trick others. “Fraudulent” is often used to describe actions or behavior that is illegal or unethical.

  • For instance, “He was charged with fraudulent activity for falsifying documents.”
  • In a discussion about consumer protection, someone might say, “Always be cautious of fraudulent websites or emails.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “That company has a history of fraudulent business practices.”

43. Trickster

A person who deceives or tricks others for personal gain. “Trickster” is a term often used to describe someone who uses cunning or deceitful tactics to manipulate others.

  • For example, “He was known as a clever trickster who could convince anyone of anything.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might mention, “Beware of tricksters who prey on vulnerable individuals.”
  • A person might describe a skilled con artist by saying, “He’s a master trickster who can easily gain people’s trust.”

44. Misleading

This term refers to something that is intended to make someone believe something that is not true or accurate. “Misleading” is often used to describe information or statements that are deceptive or dishonest.

  • For instance, “The advertisement was misleading, as the product did not deliver what was promised.”
  • In a discussion about false advertising, someone might say, “Companies should be held accountable for using misleading claims.”
  • A person might warn others by saying, “Don’t be fooled by misleading headlines or clickbait articles.”

45. Deceptive

This term describes something that is intended to deceive or trick others by giving a false impression or appearance. “Deceptive” is often used to describe actions, behavior, or appearances that are misleading or dishonest.

  • For example, “He used deceptive tactics to gain an advantage over his competitors.”
  • In a discussion about scams, someone might mention, “The email appeared to be legitimate, but it was actually deceptive.”
  • A person might describe a manipulative person by saying, “She has a talent for using deceptive charm to get what she wants.”

46. Illusory

Illusory refers to something that is deceptive or misleading, often creating a false impression or illusion.

  • For example, a magician might create an illusory effect to make something appear to vanish.
  • In a discussion about optical illusions, one might say, “The illusory nature of these images can trick the eye.”
  • A person might describe a misleading advertisement as “illusory marketing tactics.”
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47. Illusive

Illusive is a term used to describe something that is difficult to find, grasp, or understand. It often refers to something that is elusive or hard to pin down.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The solution to the puzzle remains illusive.”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious creature, someone might say, “The illusive Bigfoot has never been captured on film.”
  • A person might describe a fleeting feeling or moment as “illusive happiness.”

48. Mysterious

When something is described as mysterious, it means it is difficult to understand, explain, or identify. It often carries an air of intrigue or fascination.

  • For example, a person might say, “The disappearance of the ancient civilization remains mysterious.”
  • In a discussion about unsolved crimes, someone might say, “The identity of the killer remains mysterious.”
  • A person might describe a person with a secretive nature as “mysterious and enigmatic.”

49. Skeevy

Skeevy is a slang term used to describe something or someone that is creepy, sleazy, or suspicious. It implies a sense of discomfort or unease.

  • For instance, a person might say, “That guy gives me a skeevy vibe.”
  • In a conversation about a rundown neighborhood, someone might say, “It’s a skeevy area with a lot of crime.”
  • A person might describe a questionable business practice as “skeevy tactics.”

50. Crock

Crock is a colloquial term used to describe something that is nonsense or untrue. It implies that the information or statement is highly dubious or false.

  • For example, a person might say, “That’s a load of crock!”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “That theory is a crock.”
  • A person might describe a false rumor or gossip as “a crock of lies.”
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51. Underhanded

This term is used to describe actions or behavior that is deceitful or done in a secretive and unfair manner.

  • For example, “He won the game by using underhanded tactics.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “The politician’s underhanded dealings were exposed.”
  • A person describing a business practice might comment, “Their underhanded approach to sales is unethical.”

52. Dubitable

This word is used to express doubt or uncertainty about something.

  • For instance, “The evidence presented is dubitable.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The claims made by the speaker are dubitable.”
  • A person discussing a controversial topic might say, “The dubitable nature of the research raises concerns.”

53. Devious

This term refers to someone who is cunning or uses clever tricks to achieve their goals.

  • For example, “He came up with a devious plan to win the game.”
  • In a discussion about a manipulative person, someone might say, “She has a devious nature.”
  • A person describing a complex problem might comment, “Finding a solution to this devious puzzle requires creativity.”

54. Not quite right

This phrase is used to describe something that seems off or questionable.

  • For instance, “The situation doesn’t feel quite right.”
  • In a conversation about a strange occurrence, someone might say, “There’s something not quite right about that.”
  • A person expressing doubt might comment, “His explanation for the missing money doesn’t seem quite right.”

55. Wack

This slang term is used to describe something that is strange, absurd, or out of the ordinary.

  • For example, “That movie was wack, I couldn’t follow the plot.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “Her outfit is really wack.”
  • A person describing a weird experience might comment, “I had the most wack dream last night.”

56. Spurious

This term describes something that is not genuine or authentic. It is often used to refer to information or claims that are not backed by evidence or are intentionally misleading.

  • For example, a person might say, “The article’s spurious claims were quickly debunked.”
  • In a debate, one might argue, “His spurious arguments were easily dismantled.”
  • A person discussing a questionable product might warn, “Be wary of spurious claims made by some companies.”

57. Rinky-dink

This slang term is used to describe something that is small, poorly made, or of low quality. It is often used to express disdain or disappointment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t believe they’re selling this rinky-dink toy for $20.”
  • In a review, a person might write, “The hotel looked nice in the pictures, but it turned out to be rinky-dink.”
  • A person discussing a shoddy product might advise, “Avoid buying rinky-dink electronics from unreliable brands.”

58. Finky

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is questionable or untrustworthy. It can refer to actions, behavior, or objects that seem suspicious or unreliable.

  • For example, a person might say, “That deal sounds finky to me. I wouldn’t trust it.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s motives, one might comment, “His finky behavior makes me question his intentions.”
  • A person warning about a potential scam might say, “Be careful of finky websites asking for your personal information.”

59. Swindly

This term describes something or someone that is involved in deceitful or fraudulent activities. It is often used to describe actions or behavior that aims to cheat or trick others.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The swindly salesman convinced me to buy a faulty product.”
  • In a discussion about scams, a person might warn, “Watch out for swindly schemes promising unrealistic returns.”
  • A person sharing a personal experience might say, “I was a victim of a swindly con artist who took my money.”

60. Unethical

This term describes actions or behavior that goes against accepted moral principles or standards. It is often used to criticize actions that are considered dishonest, unfair, or harmful.

  • For example, a person might say, “It is unethical to cheat on an exam.”
  • In a debate about business practices, one might argue, “Exploiting workers for profit is unethical.”
  • A person discussing a controversial decision might comment, “Many people consider the company’s actions to be unethical.”

61. Illegitimate

This term is used to describe something that is not genuine or legitimate. It often implies that the thing in question is deceptive or dishonest.

  • For example, a person might say, “That website is selling illegitimate copies of designer handbags.”
  • In a political context, someone might accuse a candidate of using illegitimate tactics to gain votes.
  • A person discussing a questionable business practice might say, “That company’s claims are illegitimate and misleading.”

62. Unverified

When something is unverified, it means that it has not been confirmed or proven to be true. It suggests that the information or claim is not reliable and should be treated with caution.

  • For instance, a news article might state, “The sources for this story are unverified and should be taken with a grain of salt.”
  • In a discussion about rumors, someone might say, “Until we have verified information, it’s all just unverified gossip.”
  • A person might question the credibility of a statement by saying, “Do you have any evidence, or is this just an unverified claim?”

63. Unsound

When something is unsound, it means that it is not logically or factually valid. It suggests that there are flaws or weaknesses in the argument or information being presented.

  • For example, a person might say, “Their reasoning is unsound and doesn’t hold up under scrutiny.”
  • In a debate, someone might point out, “Your argument is unsound because it relies on faulty assumptions.”
  • A person might express doubt about a theory by saying, “I find their explanation to be unsound and lacking evidence.”

64. Unstable

Unstable is used to describe something that is not steady or reliable. It suggests that the thing in question is likely to change or collapse.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The economy is unstable and could crash at any moment.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Their marriage is unstable and on the verge of falling apart.”
  • A person might express concern about a person’s mental state by saying, “I’m worried about their emotional stability. They seem very unstable lately.”

65. Unconvincing

When something is unconvincing, it means that it fails to persuade or convince someone. It suggests that the argument or evidence presented is not strong enough to support the claim.

  • For example, a person might say, “His explanation for being late was unconvincing. I don’t believe him.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “Your counter-argument is unconvincing because it ignores key facts.”
  • A person might express doubt about a sales pitch by saying, “Their claims are unconvincing. I’m not convinced their product will deliver as promised.”

66. Unproven

This term refers to something that has not yet been proven or verified. It suggests that there is a lack of evidence or support for the claim or statement.

  • For example, “The theory is still unproven and requires further investigation.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might say, “I’m skeptical because the benefits are unproven.”
  • A scientist might state, “We cannot make conclusions based on unproven hypotheses alone.”

67. Unsubstantiated

This term describes something that lacks evidence or proof to support its validity or truth. It suggests that there is a lack of substantiation or verification.

  • For instance, “The claims made by the company are unsubstantiated and should be questioned.”
  • In a debate, one might argue, “Your statement is unsubstantiated and cannot be taken seriously.”
  • A journalist might write, “The article contains several unsubstantiated allegations that need further investigation.”

68. Unfounded

This term refers to something that is without a basis in fact or truth. It suggests that there is no valid or reliable evidence to support the claim or belief.

  • For example, “The rumors about his involvement in the scandal are unfounded and should be disregarded.”
  • In a discussion about a conspiracy theory, someone might say, “The claims are completely unfounded and lack any credible evidence.”
  • A lawyer might argue, “The prosecution’s case is unfounded and should be dismissed.”

69. Unjustified

This term describes something that lacks a valid reason or justification. It suggests that there is no sufficient or legitimate basis for the action or belief.

  • For instance, “His angry outburst was unjustified and uncalled for.”
  • In a debate, one might say, “Your criticism is unjustified and lacks merit.”
  • A teacher might comment, “The student’s behavior was unjustified and will not be tolerated.”

70. Unreputable

This term refers to something or someone that has a bad or negative reputation. It suggests that the person or thing is not reputable or trustworthy.

  • For example, “I would not buy a product from an unreputable company.”
  • In a discussion about a business, someone might say, “They have an unreputable track record and should be avoided.”
  • A consumer might warn, “Be cautious of unreputable sellers online.”

71. Unprincipled

This term refers to someone or something that lacks moral principles or integrity. It is often used to describe individuals or actions that are dishonest, unethical, or deceitful.

  • For example, a person might say, “I don’t trust him, he’s known for his unprincipled behavior.”
  • In a discussion about corrupt politicians, someone might comment, “The unprincipled actions of these officials are ruining our democracy.”
  • A news article might describe a company’s practices as “unprincipled” if they engage in fraudulent activities.
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72. Untruthful

This word is used to describe someone who is not truthful or who habitually tells lies. It implies a lack of honesty, integrity, or trustworthiness.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can’t believe anything he says, he’s so untruthful.”
  • In a discussion about a cheating partner, someone might comment, “His untruthful behavior destroyed our relationship.”
  • A news headline might read, “Politician caught in untruthful statements during press conference.”