Top 25 Slang For Dwell – Meaning & Usage

Are you ready to up your slang game and sound like a true insider? Look no further! We’ve gathered the hottest and most trendy slang for “dwell” that will have you speaking like a pro in no time. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with our curated list of must-know terms for all things dwelling-related. Let’s dive in and level up your vocabulary game!

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1. Crash

To crash refers to staying temporarily in a place, usually without paying or without permission. It can also mean to sleep at someone else’s place for the night.

  • For example, “I crashed at my friend’s house after the party.”
  • A person might say, “Can I crash on your couch tonight?”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “We crashed at a hostel during our trip.”

2. Shack up

To shack up means to move in and live together, especially without being married. It often implies a casual or temporary living arrangement.

  • For instance, “They decided to shack up after dating for only a few months.”
  • A person might say, “I’m thinking about shacking up with my partner next year.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might mention, “Some couples choose to shack up before getting married.”

3. Cozy up

To cozy up means to make oneself comfortable in a place. It can also refer to getting cozy with someone, either physically or emotionally.

  • For example, “I like to cozy up with a good book on a rainy day.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s cozy up by the fireplace and watch a movie.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might mention, “They were cozying up to each other all night.”

4. Nest

To nest means to create a cozy and comfortable home. It can also refer to settling down and establishing a stable living situation.

  • For instance, “After years of traveling, I finally decided to nest in a small town.”
  • A person might say, “I love nesting and decorating my apartment.”
  • In a discussion about home improvement, someone might mention, “I’m planning to nest and renovate my kitchen.”

5. Lodge

To lodge refers to staying in a lodge or cabin, typically in a remote or natural setting. It can also mean to temporarily stay somewhere.

  • For example, “We decided to lodge in a mountain cabin for the weekend.”
  • A person might say, “I’m planning to lodge at a beachside resort during my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might mention, “I love to lodge in cozy cabins during winter.”

6. Reside

This term simply means to live or have one’s permanent home in a particular place.

  • For example, “I reside in the suburbs of New York City.”
  • When filling out a form, one might indicate their address as the place where they reside.
  • A person might say, “I’ve resided in this neighborhood for over 20 years.”

7. Inhabit

To inhabit means to live or occupy a place or environment.

  • For instance, “Various species inhabit the rainforests of South America.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, someone might mention, “The goal is to create spaces that are inviting for people to inhabit.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve inhabited this apartment for the past three years.”

8. Roost

Roosting refers to finding a place to rest or settle, particularly for birds or other animals.

  • For example, “Birds roost in the trees at night.”
  • When observing a group of pigeons, one might comment, “They have found their roost for the day.”
  • A person might say, “I love watching the bats roost in the old barn.”

9. Bunk

To bunk means to sleep or spend the night in a particular place.

  • For instance, “I bunked at my friend’s house after the party.”
  • When discussing sleeping arrangements, one might say, “I’ll bunk with my sister while we’re on vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I bunked in a hostel during my backpacking trip.”

10. Quarter

In this context, “quarter” refers to a place of residence or living quarters.

  • For example, “He found a cozy quarter in the heart of the city.”
  • When discussing military life, someone might mention, “Soldiers are often assigned to different quarters while on base.”
  • A person might say, “I’m looking for affordable quarters near my workplace.”

11. Room

This refers to a physical space where someone lives or stays. It can be a bedroom, apartment, or any other designated area for dwelling.

  • For example, “I need to clean my room before my parents come over.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a spare room where I can crash for the night?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m looking for a room to rent in the city center.”

12. Board

This term refers to a place where someone can stay or live temporarily. It can also refer to a boarding house or a place that provides lodging for a fee.

  • For instance, “I found board at a small guesthouse near the beach.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you know any good boarding options in this area?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m staying at a board while I’m in town for the conference.”

13. Doss

This slang term refers to a place where someone sleeps or spends the night, often in a temporary or makeshift manner.

  • For example, “I dossed on my friend’s couch last night.”
  • A person might ask, “Can I doss at your place for a few days?”
  • Someone might say, “I need to find a doss for the weekend.”

14. Settle

This term means to find a permanent or long-term place to live or stay. It can also imply the act of establishing oneself in a particular location.

  • For instance, “I finally settled in a cozy apartment in the city.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you settled in your new house yet?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m planning to settle in this town for the next few years.”

15. Crash pad

This slang term refers to a temporary place to stay, often used when someone needs a quick and temporary solution for lodging.

  • For example, “I crashed at my friend’s place for a few nights while I was between apartments.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have a crash pad I can use for the weekend?”
  • Someone might say, “I’m looking for a crash pad near the airport for my layover.”

16. Domicile

This term refers to a person’s permanent residence or place of dwelling. It is often used in a formal or legal context.

  • For example, “He moved to his new domicile in the suburbs.”
  • A real estate agent might say, “This luxurious mansion could be your dream domicile.”
  • In a legal document, it might state, “The parties agree that the child’s domicile shall be with the mother.”

17. Lodge in

This phrase means to temporarily stay or reside in a particular place, such as a hotel or someone else’s home.

  • For instance, “They decided to lodge in a cozy cabin for the weekend.”
  • A traveler might say, “I plan to lodge in a hostel during my trip.”
  • If someone offers their home, they might say, “Feel free to lodge in my guest room for the night.”

18. Room in

This term means to occupy a room or space within a larger dwelling, such as renting a room in someone’s house or staying in a college dormitory.

  • For example, “He decided to room in a shared apartment to save money.”
  • A student might say, “I roomed in the dorms during my first year of college.”
  • If someone is looking for a roommate, they might say, “I have a spare room in my house. Would you like to room in?”

19. Squat

This slang term refers to living in a place without legal permission or without paying rent. It often implies occupying an abandoned or unoccupied property.

  • For instance, “The homeless man had been squatting in the vacant building for months.”
  • A person might say, “I found a great spot to squat in while I save up for an apartment.”
  • In a discussion about affordable housing, someone might argue, “People squat out of necessity due to the lack of affordable options.”

20. Camp out

This phrase means to temporarily stay in a place overnight, often in a makeshift or temporary shelter, such as a tent or sleeping bag.

  • For example, “They decided to camp out in the wilderness for the weekend.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Let’s camp out in the backyard and have a bonfire.”
  • If someone plans to attend a concert, they might say, “We’re going to camp out overnight to secure a good spot in line.”

21. Co-habitate

This term refers to the act of two or more people living together in the same space. It often implies a more committed or long-term living arrangement.

  • For example, “They decided to co-habitate after dating for a year.”
  • A person might say, “I’m looking for a roommate to co-habitate with in the city.”
  • In a conversation about living situations, someone might mention, “My sister and her partner co-habitate in a small apartment.”

22. Crashpad

A crashpad is a slang term for a temporary or short-term living space. It is often used to describe a place to stay temporarily, such as a friend’s couch or a cheap hotel room.

  • For instance, “I crashed at my friend’s crashpad for a few nights while visiting the city.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a crashpad for the weekend since I’ll be in town for a concert.”
  • In a discussion about budget travel, someone might suggest, “You can save money by booking a crashpad instead of a hotel room.”

23. Doss down

To doss down means to sleep or rest, often in a casual or temporary manner. It is commonly used in informal or colloquial settings.

  • For example, “After a long day of hiking, we dossed down in our sleeping bags.”
  • A person might say, “I’m exhausted, I just want to doss down on the couch for a bit.”
  • In a conversation about finding a place to sleep, someone might ask, “Can I doss down at your place tonight?”

24. Roomie

Roomie is a slang term for a roommate, referring to someone with whom you share a living space.

  • For instance, “My roomie and I get along really well.”
  • A person might say, “I’m looking for a new roomie to share the rent with.”
  • In a discussion about living arrangements, someone might mention, “My roomie and I have different schedules, so we rarely see each other.”

25. Homestead

To homestead means to settle or establish a home, often in a rural or remote area. It can also refer to the act of creating a self-sufficient lifestyle.

  • For example, “They decided to homestead in the countryside and live off the land.”
  • A person might say, “I dream of homesteading and living a simpler life.”
  • In a conversation about sustainable living, someone might discuss the concept of homesteading and its benefits.
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