Top 58 Slang For Dying – Meaning & Usage

Death is an inevitable part of life, and throughout history, humans have developed countless euphemisms and slang terms to talk about it. From the humorous to the macabre, we’ve gathered a list of the top slang phrases for dying that will both educate and entertain you. So, grab a seat and join us on this journey through the language of mortality.

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1. Kick the bucket

This phrase is a euphemism for dying. It is believed to have originated from the idea of a person standing on a bucket with a noose around their neck and then kicking the bucket away to hang themselves.

  • For example, someone might say, “He finally kicked the bucket after a long battle with cancer.”
  • In a humorous context, a person might joke, “I hope I don’t kick the bucket before I finish watching my favorite TV show.”
  • A doctor might use this phrase to inform a patient’s family, “I’m sorry to say that your loved one has kicked the bucket.”

2. Bite the dust

This phrase is often used to describe someone who has either died or suffered a defeat or failure. It is believed to have originated from the idea of someone falling to the ground, kicking up dust, after being shot or killed in battle.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He bit the dust after losing his job.”
  • In a war movie, a soldier might say, “Those enemies are going to bite the dust.”
  • A news article might use this phrase to describe a celebrity’s death, “Famous actor bites the dust at age 80.”

3. Pushing up daisies

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying that someone has died and been buried. It implies that flowers, specifically daisies, will grow on top of their grave.

  • For example, a person might say, “When I die, I want to be pushing up daisies in a beautiful garden.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “We’re all going to be pushing up daisies someday.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in a poem or story to describe a character’s death, “After a long and fulfilling life, she was finally pushing up daisies.”

4. Cash in one’s chips

This phrase is a gambling metaphor that means to die. It originated from the idea of exchanging poker chips for money when leaving a game, implying that a person is cashing in their life.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He cashed in his chips peacefully in his sleep.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We never know when we’ll cash in our chips.”
  • A news headline might use this phrase to report a celebrity’s death, “Iconic singer cashes in his chips at age 90.”

5. Meet one’s maker

This phrase refers to the belief that after death, a person will meet their creator or God for judgment. It implies that death is a transition from the earthly life to the afterlife.

  • For example, a person might say, “When I die, I hope to meet my maker and find peace.”
  • In a religious context, someone might say, “We should all live our lives in a way that prepares us to meet our maker.”
  • A novelist might use this phrase in a book to describe a character’s death, “As he took his last breath, he knew he was about to meet his maker.”

6. Shuffle off this mortal coil

This phrase, derived from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, refers to the act of passing away or dying. It emphasizes the transient nature of human life.

  • For example, someone might say, “When I shuffle off this mortal coil, I want to be remembered for my accomplishments.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, a person might ponder, “What happens to our souls when we shuffle off this mortal coil?”
  • Another might reflect, “Life is short and unpredictable. We never know when we’ll shuffle off this mortal coil.”

7. Croak

This slang term for dying is often used in a lighthearted or humorous way. It can also be used metaphorically to mean the end of something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “If I eat any more, I’m going to croak!”
  • In a conversation about a failing business, a person might comment, “If we don’t turn things around soon, we’re going to croak.”
  • Another might joke, “I’ve been working so hard, I feel like I’m going to croak any day now.”

8. Buy the farm

This phrase originated from the military and refers to a soldier dying in battle and being buried on the farm they were fighting on. It has since evolved to mean any sudden or unexpected death.

  • For example, someone might say, “He bought the farm in a car accident last night.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, a person might remark, “We never know when we’re going to buy the farm, so we should make the most of our time.”
  • Another might say, “When I buy the farm, I hope it’s peacefully in my sleep.”

9. Pop one’s clogs

This phrase is commonly used in British slang to mean dying. The term “clogs” refers to a person’s shoes, implying that when they die, their shoes will no longer be needed.

  • For instance, someone might say, “When I pop my clogs, I want to be surrounded by loved ones.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might reflect, “We all have to pop our clogs eventually, so we should make the most of our time.”
  • Another might joke, “I’m not ready to pop my clogs just yet. I still have so much to do!”

10. Give up the ghost

This phrase refers to the moment when something or someone dies or stops working. It can be used both literally and metaphorically.

  • For example, someone might say, “After years of battling illness, he finally gave up the ghost.”
  • In a discussion about a broken-down car, a person might comment, “I think it’s time to give up the ghost and get a new one.”
  • Another might use the phrase metaphorically and say, “After a string of failed relationships, she decided to give up the ghost and focus on herself.”

11. Meet one’s end

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or coming to the end of one’s life. It implies that a person’s life has reached its final point or conclusion.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, she finally met her end.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to meet our end eventually.”
  • When referring to a tragic event, one might say, “Unfortunately, many lives met their end in the accident.”

12. Pass away

This is a gentle way of saying that someone has died. It is a common phrase used to express condolences or talk about someone’s death in a more sensitive manner.

  • For instance, “He passed away peacefully in his sleep.”
  • When sharing the news of a loved one’s death, someone might say, “I’m sorry to inform you that she has passed away.”
  • In a eulogy, a person might reflect, “He will be remembered for the impact he made before passing away.”

13. Depart this life

This phrase refers to the act of leaving this world or ceasing to exist. It suggests a transition from the earthly realm to an unknown afterlife or state of being.

  • For example, “She departed this life surrounded by loved ones.”
  • When discussing the loss of a family member, someone might say, “It’s never easy when a loved one departs this life.”
  • In a philosophical conversation, one might ponder, “What do you think happens to us when we depart this life?”

14. Go to the great beyond

This phrase is a whimsical way of referring to death or the afterlife. It implies a journey or transition to a mysterious and unknown realm beyond the physical world.

  • For instance, “When he passed, he went to the great beyond.”
  • In a discussion about spirituality, someone might say, “I believe we all go to the great beyond after we die.”
  • When discussing the loss of a beloved pet, someone might say, “I like to think they’re in the great beyond, chasing butterflies.”

15. Take one’s last breath

This phrase signifies the final moment of life, when a person exhales for the final time. It is often used to describe the moment of death or the end of a person’s existence.

  • For example, “She took her last breath peacefully, surrounded by family.”
  • When describing a tragic event, someone might say, “Many lives were lost, each taking their last breath.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, one might reflect, “We never know when we’ll take our last breath, so we must cherish each moment.”

16. Go to one’s final resting place

This phrase is a euphemism for dying and refers to the act of someone’s soul or body going to their eternal resting place after death.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, she finally went to her final resting place.”
  • In a somber conversation about loss, someone might say, “When my grandfather goes to his final resting place, I’ll always cherish the memories we shared.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a eulogy, saying, “May he find peace as he goes to his final resting place.”

17. Cross over

This phrase is often used to describe the act of someone’s soul or spirit moving from the physical world to the afterlife.

  • For instance, “After a long illness, she peacefully crossed over.”
  • In a conversation about a loved one who has passed, someone might say, “I believe that when we die, we cross over to another realm.”
  • A person discussing their spiritual beliefs might mention, “I believe that our souls cross over to the other side when we die.”

18. Check out

This phrase is a casual and colloquial way of referring to the act of dying.

  • For example, “He checked out peacefully in his sleep.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to check out eventually.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their grief, saying, “I can’t believe he checked out so suddenly.”

19. Bite the big one

This phrase is a humorous and slang way of referring to the act of dying.

  • For instance, “He finally bit the big one after a long battle with illness.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about mortality, someone might say, “When I go, I hope I don’t bite the big one.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a joking manner, saying, “If I eat that much cake, I’ll probably bite the big one!”

20. Kick off

This phrase is a slang term for dying and refers to the act of someone’s life coming to an end.

  • For example, “After a long and fulfilling life, he kicked off surrounded by loved ones.”
  • In a conversation about death, someone might say, “When I kick off, I hope it’s peacefully in my sleep.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express their sadness, saying, “I can’t believe she kicked off so suddenly.”

21. Meet one’s demise

This phrase is often used to describe someone’s death in a more dramatic or poetic way.

  • For example, “He met his demise in a tragic car accident.”
  • In a historical context, one might say, “Many soldiers met their demise on the battlefield.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in a fictional story, “The villain met his demise at the hands of the hero.”

22. Pass on

This is a euphemism for dying, often used to soften the impact of discussing death.

  • For instance, “She passed on peacefully in her sleep.”
  • When someone is grieving, you might say, “I’m sorry to hear about your loss. Your loved one has passed on.”
  • A doctor might use this phrase to deliver sad news, “I’m afraid your father has passed on.”

23. Rest in peace

This phrase is often used as a farewell or as a sign of respect for the deceased.

  • For example, “Rest in peace, Grandma. You will be missed.”
  • When paying respects at a funeral, one might say, “May he rest in peace and find eternal happiness.”
  • A person might write in a condolence card, “Wishing you comfort and peace during this difficult time. May your loved one rest in peace.”

24. Be six feet under

This phrase refers to the traditional burial depth of six feet, and is used to imply that someone has died and been laid to rest.

  • For instance, “After a long battle with illness, he is finally six feet under.”
  • When discussing funeral arrangements, someone might say, “He requested to be cremated and his ashes scattered, rather than being six feet under.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a metaphorical sense, “After that embarrassing incident, my reputation will be six feet under.”

25. Be pushing up the daisies

This phrase is often used in a humorous or lighthearted manner to refer to someone who has died and been buried.

  • For example, “When I’m gone, I don’t want people mourning. I want them laughing and saying, ‘He’s pushing up the daisies now.'”
  • A person might joke, “I’ll keep working until I’m pushing up the daisies.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, one might say, “We’re all going to end up pushing up the daisies someday, so let’s make the most of our time here.”

26. Be in a better place

This phrase is used to refer to someone who has died and is believed to be in a better or happier place after death.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, she is finally in a better place.”
  • When talking about a deceased loved one, someone might say, “I take comfort in knowing that they are now in a better place.”
  • In a eulogy, a speaker might say, “She lived a full life and is now in a better place, free from pain and suffering.”

27. Be no longer with us

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has died and is no longer alive.

  • For instance, “Our beloved grandmother is no longer with us.”
  • When discussing the death of a famous person, someone might say, “The legendary musician is sadly no longer with us.”
  • In an obituary, it might be written, “He passed away peacefully and is now no longer with us.”

28. Be in the great beyond

This phrase is used to refer to someone who has died and is believed to have moved on to an unknown or spiritual realm.

  • For example, “She has left this world and is now in the great beyond.”
  • When talking about the loss of a loved one, someone might say, “I hope they are at peace in the great beyond.”
  • In a poem or song lyrics, it might be written, “He has passed on to the great beyond, leaving behind cherished memories.”

29. Be in the afterlife

This phrase is used to indicate that someone has died and is believed to be existing in a spiritual or metaphysical realm after death.

  • For instance, “She has left this earthly plane and is now in the afterlife.”
  • When discussing the concept of life after death, someone might say, “We don’t know what awaits us in the afterlife.”
  • In a religious context, it might be said, “He has gone to the afterlife, where he will be reunited with loved ones.”

30. Be in the land of the dead

This phrase is used to describe someone who has died and is believed to be residing in the realm of the dead.

  • For example, “He has crossed over to the land of the dead.”
  • When discussing mythology or folklore, someone might say, “In ancient tales, heroes often journeyed to the land of the dead.”
  • In a discussion about different cultural beliefs about death, it might be mentioned, “In some cultures, the land of the dead is seen as a place of rest and reflection.”

31. Be in the hereafter

This phrase is a euphemism for being deceased or in the spiritual realm after death.

  • For example, “After a long battle with illness, she is now in the hereafter.”
  • In a discussion about life after death, someone might say, “I wonder what awaits us in the hereafter.”
  • A person might use this phrase to express condolences, saying, “May he rest in peace and be in the hereafter.”

32. Be in the next world

Similar to “be in the hereafter,” this phrase is another euphemism for being deceased or in the spiritual realm after death.

  • For instance, “She has left this world and is now in the next world.”
  • In a conversation about different beliefs about the afterlife, someone might mention, “In some cultures, it is believed that the soul continues its journey in the next world.”
  • When expressing sympathy, a person might say, “May he find peace and happiness in the next world.”

33. Take a dirt nap

This slang phrase refers to the act of dying and being buried in a grave, often with a humorous or casual tone.

  • For example, “When I’m gone, just bury me in the backyard and let me take a dirt nap.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about death, someone might say, “Well, when my time comes, I’ll just take a dirt nap.”
  • This phrase can also be used metaphorically to mean falling into a deep sleep, as in, “After a long day, I’m ready to take a dirt nap.”

34. Go six feet under

This slang phrase implies the act of being buried in a grave, with the depth of six feet being the traditional depth for burial.

  • For instance, “When I die, I want to go six feet under and rest in peace.”
  • In a discussion about burial customs, one might mention, “In many cultures, the deceased are laid to rest six feet under.”
  • This phrase can also be used figuratively to mean the end of something, as in, “After years of hard work, the company finally went six feet under.”

35. Meet one’s doom

This expression refers to the act of facing one’s death or experiencing a tragic fate.

  • For example, “In the horror movie, all the characters meet their doom one by one.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of a certain activity, someone might warn, “If you’re not careful, you could meet your doom.”
  • This phrase can also be used metaphorically to mean facing a disastrous outcome, as in, “If we don’t take action, we’ll meet our doom.”

36. Go to the other side

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away. It suggests the idea of transitioning to the afterlife or another realm.

  • For example, someone might say, “She went to the other side peacefully in her sleep.”
  • In a conversation about a deceased loved one, a person might mention, “He’s gone to the other side, but his memory lives on.”
  • A person reflecting on their mortality might say, “I wonder what awaits me on the other side.”

37. Meet one’s final resting place

This phrase refers to the act of being buried after death. It implies that the deceased has found their permanent resting place.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After a long life, he finally met his final resting place.”
  • In a discussion about funeral arrangements, someone might mention, “She wanted to be cremated and have her ashes scattered, rather than meeting a traditional final resting place.”
  • A person discussing cemetery plots might say, “Finding the perfect final resting place for a loved one can bring closure and peace.”

38. Join the choir invisible

This phrase, coined by Shakespeare in “Hamlet,” refers to the act of dying. It suggests the idea of joining a heavenly choir, where the deceased becomes part of an invisible group of souls.

  • For example, someone might say, “She has joined the choir invisible after a long battle with illness.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might mention, “We will all join the choir invisible someday.”
  • A person discussing the loss of a loved one might say, “It’s comforting to think that they have joined the choir invisible and are at peace.”

39. Go to a better place

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or passing away. It implies that the deceased has moved on to a better or more peaceful place.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After a life filled with suffering, she has finally gone to a better place.”
  • In a discussion about the afterlife, someone might mention, “Different cultures have different beliefs about where people go after they pass on.”
  • A person reflecting on their mortality might say, “I hope that when I go, I’ll go to a better place.”

40. Answer the final call

This phrase refers to the act of dying. It suggests the idea of a final call or summons that the deceased must answer.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long battle with illness, he finally answered the final call.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, a person might mention, “We will all have to answer the final call someday.”
  • A person discussing the loss of a loved one might say, “It’s never easy when someone we love answers the final call.”

41. Be no more

This phrase is a euphemism for dying or ceasing to exist. It implies that the person or thing is no longer alive or in existence.

  • For example, a person might say, “When I die, I want to be no more, just peacefully fade away.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might ponder, “What happens to us when we are no more?”
  • A poet might write, “In the end, we all shall be no more, returning to the earth from which we came.”

42. Cease to exist

This phrase means to stop existing or to no longer be alive. It implies the end of something or someone’s existence.

  • For instance, a person might say, “When I die, I will cease to exist, but my memories will live on.”
  • In a philosophical conversation, someone might ask, “What happens to our consciousness when we cease to exist?”
  • A scientist might explain, “When a star runs out of fuel, it ceases to exist as a star and goes through a process of collapse.”

43. Give up the fight

This phrase means to accept death or to stop resisting the inevitable. It implies that a person is no longer fighting to stay alive.

  • For example, a person might say, “After a long battle with illness, he finally gave up the fight.”
  • In a discussion about end-of-life decisions, someone might mention, “Sometimes, it’s okay to give up the fight and let nature take its course.”
  • A caregiver might express, “It’s hard to watch a loved one suffer, but we have to respect their decision to give up the fight.”

44. Perish

This word means to die or to come to an end. It implies a sudden or untimely death.

  • For instance, a person might say, “In the face of danger, many perish.”
  • In a discussion about the extinction of species, someone might mention, “If we don’t take action, many animals will perish.”
  • A writer might use this word in a poem, “In the depths of darkness, hope perishes.”

45. Take the last train

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying someone has died. It implies that they have embarked on a final journey or transition.

  • For example, a person might say, “When my time comes, I hope to take the last train peacefully.”
  • In a conversation about the afterlife, someone might ask, “Where do we go when we take the last train?”
  • A songwriter might use this phrase in a song, “When I take the last train, I’ll leave my troubles behind.”

46. Kick it

This slang term is used to refer to someone dying. It can be used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I eat another slice of pizza, I’m going to kick it!”
  • In a conversation about mortality, one might say, “We all know that one day we’ll kick it.”
  • When discussing a death in the family, a person might say, “My grandfather kicked it last night.”

47. Go to one’s eternal rest

This phrase is a euphemism for dying and implies that the person has found eternal rest or peace in the afterlife.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After a long battle with illness, she has finally gone to her eternal rest.”
  • In a eulogy, someone might say, “He lived a full life and has now gone to his eternal rest.”
  • When discussing the loss of a loved one, a person might say, “I take comfort in knowing that they have gone to their eternal rest.”

48. Meet one’s final destination

This phrase implies that death is the final destination or end point of a person’s life journey.

  • For example, someone might say, “When we die, we meet our final destination.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, one might say, “No one knows what awaits us at our final destination.”
  • When discussing a recent death, a person might say, “She has finally met her final destination.”

49. Shuffle loose this mortal coil

This phrase is a poetic and metaphorical way of referring to the act of dying and leaving behind the physical body.

  • For instance, a person might say, “When I shuffle loose this mortal coil, I hope to find peace.”
  • In a discussion about the afterlife, someone might say, “Many believe that when we shuffle loose this mortal coil, our souls continue on.”
  • When talking about the inevitability of death, a person might say, “We all must shuffle loose this mortal coil eventually.”

50. Depart from this world

This phrase signifies the act of leaving the physical world and transitioning into the afterlife.

  • For example, someone might say, “When we depart from this world, our souls live on.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, one might say, “We are all destined to depart from this world eventually.”
  • When discussing a recent death, a person might say, “He has departed from this world, but his memory will live on.”

51. Take the dirt nap

This phrase is a euphemism for dying and refers to the act of being buried in the ground after death. It is often used in a humorous or lighthearted manner.

  • For example, someone might say, “If I eat another slice of cake, I’m going to take the dirt nap.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, a person might joke, “When I die, just bury me in the backyard and let me take the dirt nap.”
  • Another might say, “I hope I live a long and happy life, but when it’s my time to go, I’m ready to take the dirt nap.”

52. Punch one’s ticket

This phrase is a metaphorical way of saying someone has died. It implies that death is like boarding a train or a bus and serves as a euphemism for the end of one’s life.

  • For instance, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He crossed the wrong people, and they punched his ticket.”
  • In a discussion about mortality, someone might say, “We all have to punch our ticket eventually.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express surprise, saying, “Wow, I can’t believe he punched his ticket so young.”

53. Go to the pearly gates

This phrase refers to the belief that after death, a person’s soul will ascend to heaven and arrive at the gates of paradise, which are often depicted as pearly or made of pearls. It is a euphemistic way of saying someone has died.

  • For example, a religious person might say, “When I go, I hope to go straight to the pearly gates.”
  • In a discussion about the afterlife, someone might say, “I wonder what it’s like to pass through the pearly gates.”
  • Another might use the phrase humorously, saying, “If I eat any more of this delicious food, I’ll be at the pearly gates in no time.”

54. Go to the happy hunting ground

This phrase is derived from Native American beliefs and refers to the concept of an afterlife where spirits of the deceased can hunt, fish, and live in abundance. It is a metaphorical way of saying someone has died.

  • For instance, in a conversation about a deceased loved one, someone might say, “I take comfort in knowing they’ve gone to the happy hunting ground.”
  • In a discussion about different cultural beliefs, a person might mention, “Native Americans believe in the concept of the happy hunting ground.”
  • Another might use the phrase to express a wish for someone’s peaceful passing, saying, “When my time comes, I hope I go to the happy hunting ground.”

55. Slip away

This phrase means to die peacefully or quietly, often without any pain or struggle. It suggests a gentle departure from life.

  • For example, in a eulogy, someone might say, “She slipped away in her sleep, surrounded by loved ones.”
  • In a conversation about the death of a pet, a person might say, “Our dog slipped away peacefully.”
  • Another might use the phrase to describe the passing of an elderly person, saying, “He lived a long and fulfilling life and eventually slipped away.”

56. Fall off the perch

This phrase is a euphemism for dying, specifically referring to someone who has died suddenly or unexpectedly. The phrase “fall off the perch” is often used in a lighthearted or humorous way.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He fell off the perch after a long and happy life.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, one might comment, “We never know when we’ll fall off the perch.”
  • A person discussing the loss of a loved one might say, “It’s hard to believe she’s fallen off the perch. She was so full of life.”

57. Go to the great sleep

This phrase is a euphemism for dying, implying a peaceful and serene transition from life to death. The phrase “go to the great sleep” is often used to convey a sense of calmness and acceptance of death.

  • For example, someone might say, “After a long battle with illness, she finally went to the great sleep.”
  • In a discussion about the afterlife, one might comment, “Many believe that we go to the great sleep when we die.”
  • A person reflecting on their own mortality might say, “I hope that when my time comes, I can go to the great sleep with grace.”

58. Go to the big sleep

This phrase is a euphemism for dying, often used to suggest a peaceful or final rest. The phrase “go to the big sleep” is sometimes associated with old-fashioned or noir language.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s gone to the big sleep, leaving behind a legacy.”
  • In a conversation about mortality, one might comment, “We all have to go to the big sleep eventually.”
  • A person discussing the loss of a loved one might say, “It’s hard to accept that she’s gone to the big sleep. We will miss her dearly.”
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