Top 62 Slang For Early On – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to understanding the latest lingo for getting things started, we’ve got you covered. Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned pro, navigating the ever-evolving landscape of slang can be a challenge. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of the trendiest slang for early on that will have you feeling in the know and ready to tackle any situation with confidence. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your vocabulary game!

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1. Off the bat

This phrase is used to describe something that happens without delay or hesitation. It suggests that something is done or decided upon right from the beginning.

  • For example, “I knew off the bat that I didn’t like him.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The team scored two runs off the bat.”
  • Someone might use this phrase to express their intuition, saying, “Off the bat, I could tell something was wrong.”

This expression is used to describe something that happens or starts right at the start or beginning. It implies that something occurs immediately or without any delay.

  • For instance, “The team scored a goal right out of the gate.”
  • A person might say, “I made a mistake right out of the gate.”
  • In a business context, someone might mention, “We need to make a strong impression right out of the gate.”

3. From the get-go

This slang phrase means that something has been happening or has been the case since the start or beginning. It implies that something has been true or ongoing from the very start.

  • For example, “He had a bad attitude from the get-go.”
  • A person might say, “I knew from the get-go that it wasn’t going to work.”
  • In a project discussion, someone might mention, “We need to set clear goals from the get-go.”

4. Off to the races

This phrase is used to describe a situation where something is starting or progressing rapidly. It suggests that things are moving forward or developing at a fast pace.

  • For instance, “Once the project was approved, we were off to the races.”
  • A person might say, “After the initial setup, the business was off to the races.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The team scored two quick goals and they’re off to the races.”

5. Out of the blocks

This expression is used to describe someone or something that starts or begins in a fast or energetic manner. It suggests that someone or something is quick off the mark or has a strong initial performance.

  • For example, “The team came out of the blocks with a strong offense.”
  • A person might say, “I was out of the blocks early and finished the project ahead of schedule.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “He’s out of the blocks quickly and taking an early lead.”

6. In the starting blocks

This phrase is often used to describe the initial stages of a process or event. It is derived from the sport of track and field, where athletes begin a race by crouching in starting blocks before the starting gun is fired.

  • For example, in a business meeting, someone might say, “We need to come up with a plan in the starting blocks of this project.”
  • When discussing a new relationship, a person might say, “We hit it off right from the starting blocks.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s give it our all right in the starting blocks.”

7. Straight off the bat

This phrase is used to indicate that something happens right away or at the very beginning. It is derived from the sport of baseball, where the batter swings at the first pitch from the pitcher.

  • For instance, if someone asks for help, you might say, “Sure, I can help you straight off the bat.”
  • When discussing a new job, a person might say, “I was given a lot of responsibility straight off the bat.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Let’s start the lesson with a quiz straight off the bat.”

8. From the word go

This phrase is used to emphasize that something has been happening or was true since the very start. It is a colloquial expression that emphasizes the importance of the initial moment or action.

  • For example, if someone asks about a long-term friendship, you might say, “We’ve been friends from the word go.”
  • When discussing a project, a person might say, “I knew it was going to be a success from the word go.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “We need to give it our all from the word go.”

9. Out the gate

This phrase is used to indicate that something happens or starts right from the start. It is derived from horse racing, where horses burst out of the starting gate at the beginning of a race.

  • For instance, if someone asks about a new business venture, you might say, “We started making profits right out the gate.”
  • When describing a new relationship, a person might say, “We had chemistry right out the gate.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Let’s dive into the lesson right out the gate.”

10. From the jump

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or was true since the very start. It is a slang expression that emphasizes the importance of the initial moment or action.

  • For example, if someone asks about a successful career, you might say, “I knew I wanted to be a doctor from the jump.”
  • When discussing a project, a person might say, “We had a clear vision from the jump.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “We need to give 100% effort from the jump.”

This phrase means to do something right away or without delay.

  • For example, “I knew right off the bat that something was wrong when she didn’t show up.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He hit a home run right off the bat.”
  • A person might say, “I can tell right off the bat if I’m going to like someone or not.”

12. From the off

This phrase means from the very start or the initial stage of something.

  • For instance, “He was suspicious of her from the off.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We need to establish clear goals from the off.”
  • A person might say, “I knew it was going to be a difficult task from the off.”

13. Out of the chute

This phrase means to start or begin something without delay or hesitation.

  • For example, “He jumped out of the chute and started working on the project.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “He came out of the chute with great speed.”
  • A person might say, “I like to get things done out of the chute to avoid procrastination.”

14. From the top

This phrase means to start or begin something from the very beginning.

  • For instance, “Let’s go through the instructions from the top.”
  • In a dance rehearsal, a choreographer might say, “Let’s practice the routine from the top.”
  • A person might say, “I want to hear the whole story from the top.”

15. Off the ground

This phrase means to start or initiate something.

  • For example, “We need to get this project off the ground as soon as possible.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We need a solid plan to get this new initiative off the ground.”
  • A person might say, “I want to get my career off the ground before settling down.”

16. ASAP

This acronym is used to indicate that something needs to be done or completed quickly. It emphasizes the urgency and importance of the task.

  • For example, a boss might say, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • A friend might text, “Can you pick me up from the airport ASAP?”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “Please turn in your homework ASAP.”

17. Pronto

This word is an adverb that means “quickly” or “without delay.” It is often used to convey a sense of urgency or to request prompt action.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “Clean your room, pronto!”
  • A customer might ask a waiter, “Can you bring the check, pronto?”
  • A supervisor might tell an employee, “Finish that task, pronto.”

18. In a jiffy

This phrase means “in a very short amount of time” or “immediately.” It is a lighthearted and informal way to express the need for prompt action.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’ll be there in a jiffy.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you finish that project in a jiffy?”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Brush your teeth in a jiffy.”

19. In the blink of an eye

This phrase means “almost instantaneously” or “in an extremely short amount of time.” It is often used to emphasize the speed or suddenness of an action.

  • For instance, a magician might say, “The coin disappeared in the blink of an eye.”
  • A driver might say, “The accident happened in the blink of an eye.”
  • A narrator might describe a quick decision as, “He made up his mind in the blink of an eye.”

This phrase means “without delay” or “immediately.” It is a straightforward and direct way to convey the need for prompt action.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Start your assignment right away.”
  • A manager might instruct an employee, “Please respond to this email right away.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Get to practice right away.”

21. Promptly

This word means to do something without delay or immediately. It is often used to indicate a quick response or action.

  • For example, “Please submit your assignments promptly.”
  • A boss might say, “I expect all employees to arrive promptly for the meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “I called customer service, and they promptly resolved my issue.”

22. Swiftly

This word means to do something with great speed or velocity. It implies a fast or efficient action.

  • For instance, “The cheetah ran swiftly across the savannah.”
  • A person might say, “I finished the task swiftly and moved on to the next.”
  • A sports commentator might exclaim, “He kicked the ball swiftly into the goal!”

23. Without delay

This phrase means to do something right away, without any hesitation or waiting. It emphasizes the need for quick action.

  • For example, “Please complete the form without delay.”
  • A teacher might say, “I need your attention without delay.”
  • A doctor might instruct, “Take this medication without delay to alleviate your symptoms.”

24. Speedily

This word means to do something at a fast pace or with high speed. It conveys a sense of urgency or efficiency.

  • For instance, “The car speedily raced down the highway.”
  • A person might say, “I need this task completed speedily.”
  • A delivery service might advertise, “Get your package speedily delivered to your door.”

25. In no time

This phrase means to do something in a very short period or without much delay. It suggests that the action will be completed promptly.

  • For example, “He fixed the broken pipe in no time.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be ready to leave in no time.”
  • A chef might boast, “I can whip up a delicious meal in no time.”

26. Rapidly

This word is used to describe something that happens very quickly or at a fast pace.

  • For example, “The car sped rapidly down the highway.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “Advancements in artificial intelligence are occurring rapidly.”
  • A person might comment, “I need to finish this project rapidly before the deadline.”

27. Early doors

This phrase is commonly used in the UK to refer to something happening or being done at the start or early stages of a situation or event.

  • For instance, “We need to make our decision early doors to secure the best price.”
  • In a conversation about a football match, one might say, “He scored a goal early doors and set the tone for the game.”
  • A person might mention, “I always like to arrive early doors to get a good seat at the theater.”

28. Off the mark

This phrase is used to describe something that is not accurate or correct, especially in the early stages or at the beginning.

  • For example, “His first attempt was off the mark, but he improved with practice.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, one might say, “We need to make sure our marketing strategy is not off the mark.”
  • A person might comment, “Her initial predictions were off the mark, but she adjusted her approach and achieved success.”

29. At the outset

This phrase is used to refer to something happening or being done at the very beginning or start of a situation or event.

  • For instance, “We discussed our goals at the outset of the project.”
  • In a conversation about a book, one might say, “The author sets the tone for the story at the outset.”
  • A person might mention, “At the outset of the meeting, the chairperson outlined the agenda.”

30. From the kick-off

This phrase is commonly used in sports, especially in soccer, to describe something happening or being done from the very beginning or start of a game or match.

  • For example, “He scored a goal from the kick-off, surprising the opposing team.”
  • In a discussion about a project, one might say, “We need to establish clear goals from the kick-off.”
  • A person might comment, “She took charge from the kick-off and led the team to victory.”

31. From the start

This phrase means to do something or have something happen right from the beginning or at the very start of a process or situation.

  • For example, “I knew from the start that I wanted to be a doctor.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s make sure we have a solid plan from the start.”
  • In a discussion about a project, a team member might suggest, “We should have clear goals from the start to avoid any confusion later on.”

32. From the commencement

This phrase is a formal way of saying “from the start” and means to do something or have something happen right from the beginning or at the very start of a process or situation.

  • For instance, “We have been with this project from the commencement.”
  • A speaker might say, “The team has been working diligently from the commencement of this initiative.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, someone might mention, “We need to plan our marketing strategy from the commencement to ensure a successful launch.”

33. From the inception

This phrase means to do something or have something happen right from the beginning or at the very start of a process or situation.

  • For example, “I have been involved in this project from its inception.”
  • Someone might say, “We need to have a clear vision from the inception of this new initiative.”
  • In a conversation about a relationship, a person might mention, “Trust is important from the inception of a romantic partnership.”

34. From the introduction

This phrase means to do something or have something happen right from the beginning or at the very start of a process or situation.

  • For instance, “We have been implementing this strategy from the introduction of the project.”
  • A speaker might say, “The team has been working together effectively from the introduction of this new workflow.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might mention, “We need to have a strong marketing plan from the introduction to attract customers.”

35. From the initiation

This phrase means to do something or have something happen right from the beginning or at the very start of a process or situation.

  • For example, “We have been actively involved from the initiation of this project.”
  • Someone might say, “We need to have a proactive approach from the initiation of this new program.”
  • In a conversation about a team, a person might mention, “Effective communication is crucial from the initiation of a collaborative effort.”

36. From the onset

This phrase refers to something happening or starting right from the beginning or at the very start.

  • For example, “From the onset of the project, we knew it would be a challenging task.”
  • In a discussion about a new business venture, someone might say, “We need to plan our strategy from the onset.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “We need to give our best effort from the onset of the game.”

37. From the launch

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been happening or in motion since the initial launch or starting point.

  • For instance, “From the launch of the new product, it gained a lot of popularity.”
  • In a conversation about a startup, someone might say, “We’ve been working hard from the launch to establish our brand.”
  • A person discussing a new website might mention, “We’ve been receiving positive feedback from the launch.”

38. From the opening

This phrase means that something has been happening or in progress since the very beginning or opening.

  • For example, “From the opening of the store, it attracted a lot of customers.”
  • In a discussion about a concert, someone might say, “The band had the crowd engaged from the opening of the first song.”
  • A theater critic might write, “The play had the audience captivated from the opening scene.”

39. From the inauguration

This phrase indicates that something has been happening or taking place since the official beginning or inauguration.

  • For instance, “From the inauguration of the project, it has been a major success.”
  • In a conversation about a political leader, someone might say, “The president has faced numerous challenges from the inauguration.”
  • A historian might mention, “The country has undergone significant changes from the inauguration of the new government.”

40. From the foundation

This phrase means that something has been happening or in existence since the initial foundation or establishment.

  • For example, “From the foundation of the organization, it has aimed to promote equality.”
  • In a discussion about a charity, someone might say, “We have been supporting the cause from the foundation.”
  • A person discussing a company might mention, “The company has experienced steady growth from the foundation.”

41. From the creation

This phrase is used to indicate something that has existed or been present since the initial creation or inception of something.

  • For example, “This tradition has been passed down from the creation of our family.”
  • In a discussion about a company, someone might say, “This policy has been in place from the creation of the organization.”
  • A historian might mention, “This artifact dates from the creation of the ancient civilization.”

42. From the establishment

This phrase is used to indicate something that has been present or in existence since the initial establishment or founding of something.

  • For instance, “This rule has been in effect from the establishment of the club.”
  • In a conversation about a government, someone might say, “These laws have been in place from the establishment of the country.”
  • A researcher might note, “This tradition has been practiced from the establishment of the religious institution.”

43. From the formation

This phrase is used to indicate something that has been present or involved since the initial formation or creation of something.

  • For example, “This member has been involved from the formation of the team.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “This idea has been present from the formation of the concept.”
  • A scientist might mention, “This process has been observed from the formation of the chemical compound.”

44. From the birth

This phrase is used to indicate something that has been present or involved since the moment of birth or the beginning of someone’s life.

  • For instance, “This trait has been present from the birth of the individual.”
  • In a conversation about a talent, someone might say, “This skill has been evident from the birth of the child.”
  • A doctor might note, “This condition has been present from the birth of the patient.”

45. From the dawn

This phrase is used to indicate something that has been present or involved since the very beginning or earliest stages of something.

  • For example, “This tradition has been celebrated from the dawn of civilization.”
  • In a discussion about a movement, someone might say, “This ideology has been present from the dawn of the revolution.”
  • A historian might mention, “This practice has been documented from the dawn of recorded history.”

46. From the beginning

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or exists right from the start or initial stage.

  • For example, “We knew from the beginning that it was going to be a difficult project.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ve been supporting you from the beginning, and I’ll continue to do so.”
  • In a discussion about a relationship, someone might say, “Honesty is important from the beginning.”

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or is done immediately or without any delay.

  • For instance, “She answered the question right off the top of her head.”
  • In a conversation about priorities, someone might say, “We need to address this issue right off the top.”
  • A person might respond, “I don’t have an answer right off the top, but I’ll get back to you.”

48. Out the box

This phrase is used to describe something that is brand new or straight from the package, without any modifications or alterations.

  • For example, “I just got this phone, it’s fresh out the box.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer using products out the box rather than customizing them.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “The latest gadget comes with amazing features right out the box.”

49. Out the door

This phrase is used to describe someone or something leaving or departing from a place.

  • For instance, “I saw him walking out the door just a few minutes ago.”
  • In a conversation about punctuality, someone might say, “We need to be out the door by 8 am.”
  • A person might ask, “Is everyone ready to go? We don’t want to keep them waiting out the door.”

50. From the jump street

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or exists right from the very beginning.

  • For example, “He knew he wanted to be a doctor from the jump street.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, someone might say, “It’s important to follow your passion from the jump street.”
  • A person might advise, “If you want to succeed, you need to give your best from the jump street.”

51. From the word jump

This phrase means to start or begin something from the very start or at the very beginning. It emphasizes the idea of starting something immediately or right away.

  • For example, “We knew we had to work hard from the word jump to make this project successful.”
  • In a conversation about a new business venture, someone might say, “We need to plan our marketing strategy from the word jump.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to give 100% effort from the word jump if we want to win this game.”

52. From the word one

Similar to “from the word jump,” this phrase means to start or begin something from the very start or at the very beginning. It emphasizes the idea of starting something immediately or right away.

  • For instance, “We knew we had to establish trust with our customers from the word one.”
  • In a discussion about a new project, someone might say, “Let’s set clear goals and expectations from the word one.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “If you want to succeed in this class, you need to be engaged from the word one.”

53. From the very beginning

This phrase means to start or begin something from the very beginning. It emphasizes the idea of starting something immediately or right away.

  • For example, “We knew we had to work hard from the very beginning to make this project successful.”
  • In a conversation about a new business venture, someone might say, “We need to plan our marketing strategy from the very beginning.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to give 100% effort from the very beginning if we want to win this game.”

This phrase means to start or begin something from the very beginning. It emphasizes the idea of starting something immediately or right away.

  • For instance, “We knew we had to establish trust with our customers right from the start.”
  • In a discussion about a new project, someone might say, “Let’s set clear goals and expectations right from the start.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “If you want to succeed in this class, you need to be engaged right from the start.”

Similar to “right from the start,” this phrase means to start or begin something from the very beginning. It emphasizes the idea of starting something immediately or right away.

  • For example, “We knew we had to work hard right from the get-go to make this project successful.”
  • In a conversation about a new business venture, someone might say, “We need to plan our marketing strategy right from the get-go.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to give 100% effort right from the get-go if we want to win this game.”

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened or started right from the start or at the very beginning.

  • For example, “He knew right from the word go that he wanted to be a musician.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We made a lot of progress right from the word go.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to give our best effort right from the word go.”

Similar to “right from the word go,” this phrase is used to indicate that something happened or started right from the start or at the very beginning.

  • For instance, “They were arguing right from the word jump.”
  • In a conversation about a relationship, someone might say, “We had chemistry right from the word jump.”
  • A person discussing a new job might mention, “I was given a lot of responsibility right from the word jump.”

This phrase is used to indicate that something happened or started right from the start or at the very beginning.

  • For example, “They had a plan right from the outset.”
  • In a discussion about a business venture, someone might say, “We encountered challenges right from the outset.”
  • A person talking about a competition might mention, “We were leading right from the outset.”

Similar to “right from the word go” and “right from the word jump,” this phrase is used to indicate that something happened or started right from the start or at the very beginning.

  • For instance, “They were in sync right from the jump street.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “We faced obstacles right from the jump street.”
  • A person discussing a friendship might mention, “We clicked right from the jump street.”

Similar to “right from the word go,” “right from the word jump,” and “right from the outset,” this phrase is used to indicate that something happened or started right from the start or at the very beginning.

  • For example, “They were rivals right from the word one.”
  • In a discussion about a team, someone might say, “We were winning right from the word one.”
  • A person talking about a project might mention, “We faced challenges right from the word one.”

This phrase emphasizes that something happened or started at the very beginning of a process or event.

  • For example, “She knew right from the very beginning that she wanted to be a doctor.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to establish our goals right from the very beginning.”
  • A person reflecting on a relationship might say, “I knew right from the very beginning that we were meant to be together.”

Similar to the previous phrase, this slang phrase means something started or happened right from the beginning of a process or event.

  • For instance, “He made his intentions clear right from the off.”
  • In a sports context, someone might say, “The team played aggressively right from the off.”
  • A person discussing a business venture might say, “We knew we had to make a strong impression right from the off.”
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