Top 38 Slang For Edited – Meaning & Usage

Editing is a crucial part of the creative process, and having the right slang to describe it can make all the difference. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for edited content that will not only keep you in the loop but also give you a glimpse into the world of editors and content creators. So, whether you’re a seasoned pro or just starting out, buckle up and get ready to level up your editing game with our curated list!

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1. Edited

To make changes or modifications to a piece of content, such as a document, photo, or video. “Edited” is a commonly used term to indicate that something has been modified or revised.

  • For example, “I just edited my essay to fix some grammar mistakes.”
  • A photographer might say, “I edited this photo to enhance the colors and contrast.”
  • In a video production context, someone might mention, “I spent hours editing this footage to create the final product.”

2. Tweaked

To make small changes or adjustments to something in order to improve or fine-tune it. “Tweaked” is often used to describe minor modifications made to a piece of content or a project.

  • For instance, “I tweaked the recipe by adding a little more salt.”
  • A software developer might say, “I tweaked the code to optimize the performance.”
  • In a design context, someone might mention, “I tweaked the layout to make it more visually appealing.”

3. Fixed up

To make repairs or improvements to something that is broken, damaged, or not functioning properly. “Fixed up” is a colloquial term used to describe the act of fixing or improving something.

  • For example, “I fixed up my old car and now it runs like new.”
  • Someone might say, “I fixed up this old piece of furniture and gave it a fresh coat of paint.”
  • In a home renovation context, a person might mention, “We fixed up the kitchen by installing new cabinets and countertops.”

4. Polished

To refine or perfect something by making it more polished or professional in appearance or quality. “Polished” is often used to describe the act of improving the overall presentation or finish of a piece of content or a project.

  • For instance, “I polished my resume to make it more impressive to potential employers.”
  • A writer might say, “I polished this article to make the language more concise and engaging.”
  • In a visual arts context, someone might mention, “I polished this sculpture by sanding and buffing it to a smooth finish.”

5. Revamped

To completely renovate or rework something in order to improve its design, functionality, or overall effectiveness. “Revamped” is often used to describe significant changes or updates made to a piece of content or a project.

  • For example, “We revamped our website to make it more user-friendly and visually appealing.”
  • A company might say, “We revamped our product packaging to better align with our brand image.”
  • In a marketing context, someone might mention, “We revamped our advertising campaign to target a younger demographic.”

6. Modified

To modify something means to make changes or alterations to it. In the context of editing, it refers to making adjustments or improvements to a piece of content.

  • For example, “I modified the article to include more recent information.”
  • A photographer might say, “I modified the image to enhance the colors.”
  • In a discussion about software development, someone might mention, “We modified the code to fix a bug.”

7. Altered

To alter something means to make changes or modifications to it. In the context of editing, it refers to making adjustments or revisions to a piece of content.

  • For instance, “I altered the document to improve its clarity.”
  • A designer might say, “I altered the layout to make it more visually appealing.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “She altered the dress to fit perfectly.”

8. Revised

To revise something means to make changes or corrections to it. In the context of editing, it refers to reviewing and improving the content for accuracy, clarity, or quality.

  • For example, “I revised the essay to address the professor’s feedback.”
  • An author might say, “I revised the manuscript to strengthen the plot.”
  • In a discussion about academic papers, someone might mention, “It’s important to revise your work before submitting it for publication.”

9. Touched up

To touch up something means to make minor improvements or adjustments to it. In the context of editing, it refers to making small changes to enhance the overall quality or appearance of a piece of content.

  • For instance, “I touched up the photo to remove some blemishes.”
  • A makeup artist might say, “I touched up her makeup before the photoshoot.”
  • In a conversation about home renovations, someone might mention, “We touched up the paint to cover any imperfections.”

10. Refurbished

To refurbish something means to renovate or restore it to a better or more improved condition. In the context of editing, it refers to making significant changes or updates to a piece of content to improve its overall quality or effectiveness.

  • For example, “I refurbished the website to give it a fresh and modern look.”
  • A car enthusiast might say, “I refurbished the vintage car to its original glory.”
  • In a discussion about interior design, someone might mention, “We refurbished the room to create a more welcoming space.”

11. Enhanced

This term refers to making improvements or additions to something to make it better or more effective. In the context of editing, it means to enhance the quality or impact of a piece of content.

  • For example, “The photo was enhanced to bring out the colors and details.”
  • In a discussion about video editing, someone might say, “I enhanced the audio by adjusting the levels and adding some effects.”
  • A content creator might mention, “I enhanced the article by incorporating multimedia elements like videos and infographics.”

12. Tailored

To “tailor” something means to modify or adapt it to suit specific needs or preferences. In the context of editing, it means to make adjustments or changes to fit a particular purpose or audience.

  • For instance, “The presentation was tailored to the client’s industry and interests.”
  • In a discussion about writing, someone might say, “I tailored the content to resonate with a younger demographic.”
  • A marketer might mention, “We tailored the campaign to target different customer segments.”

13. Fine-tuned

To “fine-tune” something means to make small adjustments or refinements in order to achieve the desired result. In the context of editing, it means to carefully adjust and perfect the details or elements of a piece of content.

  • For example, “The performance was fine-tuned to ensure smooth execution.”
  • In a discussion about graphic design, someone might say, “I fine-tuned the layout to create a better visual hierarchy.”
  • A musician might mention, “I spent hours fine-tuning the mix to achieve the perfect balance of instruments and vocals.”

14. Amended

To “amend” something means to make changes or modifications, typically in a formal or official context. In the context of editing, it means to make corrections or alterations to improve accuracy or clarity.

  • For instance, “The document was amended to include additional information.”
  • In a discussion about legal writing, someone might say, “I amended the contract to reflect the agreed-upon terms.”
  • An editor might mention, “I amended the article by removing factual errors and adding more context.”

15. Rectified

To “rectify” something means to fix or correct it, especially when it is wrong or inaccurate. In the context of editing, it means to address and resolve any errors or issues to improve the overall quality or reliability of a piece of content.

  • For example, “The error in the report was rectified before it was published.”
  • In a discussion about proofreading, someone might say, “I carefully rectified all the spelling and grammar mistakes.”
  • A teacher might mention, “I provided feedback to help students rectify their writing and improve their grades.”

16. Revise

To revise means to make changes or alterations to something, typically in order to improve it or correct errors. It is often used when referring to editing written work.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “You need to revise your essay before submitting it.”
  • A writer might say, “I always revise my work multiple times to ensure it is polished.”
  • In a professional setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you revise this report and make it more concise?”

17. Redacted

To redact means to edit or censor information by removing or obscuring certain parts. It is often used in legal or sensitive documents to protect confidential or classified information.

  • For instance, a government document might be released with certain names or details redacted.
  • In a news article, it might be mentioned, “Sensitive information in the report was redacted to protect privacy.”
  • A journalist might say, “The document was heavily redacted, making it difficult to decipher the full story.”

18. Adapted

To adapt means to modify or adjust something in order to make it suitable for a different purpose or situation. It can also refer to making changes to fit a new environment or circumstances.

  • For example, a book might be adapted into a movie, with changes made to the story for the big screen.
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “The app was adapted for use on different operating systems.”
  • A traveler might say, “I had to adapt to the local customs and traditions during my trip.”

19. Revisited

To revisit means to review or examine something again, often with the intention of making changes or updates. It can also refer to going back to a place or situation that one has previously experienced.

  • For instance, a writer might say, “I revisited my old blog posts and made some updates.”
  • In a conversation about a previous decision, someone might say, “I think it’s time to revisit that idea and see if it still makes sense.”
  • A tourist might mention, “During my vacation, I revisited all my favorite spots from my last trip.”

20. Rewritten

To rewrite means to write something again, often with the intention of improving it or making significant changes. It is commonly used in the context of editing and revising written work.

  • For example, an author might say, “I had to completely rewrite the ending of my novel.”
  • In a discussion about a screenplay, someone might comment, “The script went through multiple rewrites before it was finalized.”
  • A student might mention, “I rewrote my essay to clarify my arguments and strengthen my thesis statement.”

21. Cleaned up

This term refers to making changes or improvements to something, typically to make it more presentable or organized. It can also refer to removing unnecessary or unwanted elements.

  • For example, “I cleaned up my essay before submitting it.”
  • In a discussion about a messy room, someone might say, “I need to clean up this place.”
  • A person might comment on a photo, “The picture looks much better after it was cleaned up.”

22. Jazzed up

This slang term means to make something more exciting, interesting, or visually appealing. It often implies adding flair or style to something.

  • For instance, “She jazzed up her outfit with a statement necklace.”
  • In a conversation about a boring presentation, someone might suggest, “Let’s jazz it up with some visuals.”
  • A person might say, “I jazzed up my living room with colorful throw pillows.”

23. Censored

This term refers to the act of removing or suppressing objectionable or sensitive content from a piece of media or communication. It is often associated with restricting or controlling information.

  • For example, “The profanity was censored in the TV show.”
  • In a discussion about news articles, someone might ask, “Why was the article censored?”
  • A person might comment on a censored photo, “I wonder what they’re trying to hide.”

24. Updated

This term means to make changes or improvements to something to bring it up to date or make it more current. It often implies incorporating new information or fixing outdated elements.

  • For instance, “I updated my resume with my latest work experience.”
  • In a conversation about software, someone might say, “Make sure you update your operating system.”
  • A person might comment on a news article, “The article was updated with new information.”

25. Fixed

This slang term means to correct or resolve a problem or issue. It implies making something functional or usable again.

  • For example, “I fixed my broken laptop.”
  • In a discussion about a leaking faucet, someone might suggest, “Call a plumber to fix it.”
  • A person might comment on a malfunctioning appliance, “I need to get it fixed before it completely stops working.”

26. Refashioned

This term refers to making changes or modifications to something, often to improve or update it. It can also imply a sense of creativity and originality in the editing process.

  • For example, “The designer refashioned the dress, giving it a modern twist.”
  • In a discussion about interior design, someone might say, “I refashioned my living room by repurposing old furniture.”
  • A writer might describe their editing process as, “I refashioned the article, adding new examples and rearranging the structure.”

27. Reworked

This slang term means to make changes or adjustments to something, typically with the goal of improving it or making it more suitable for a specific purpose.

  • For instance, “The director reworked the script to make the ending more impactful.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “I had to rework the entire design after receiving feedback.”
  • A musician might talk about how they reworked a song, saying, “I changed the arrangement and added new lyrics to make it more catchy.”

28. Perfected

This word implies that something has been edited or modified to the point of being flawless or ideal. It suggests that the editing process has refined and improved the original.

  • For example, “The chef perfected the recipe after numerous experiments.”
  • In a discussion about a painting, someone might say, “The artist spent months perfecting the details.”
  • A photographer might describe their editing process as, “I meticulously perfected the image, adjusting the lighting and colors.”

29. Made over

This slang term means to completely change or overhaul something through editing or modification. It suggests a significant and noticeable transformation from the original.

  • For instance, “The room was made over with new furniture and a fresh coat of paint.”
  • In a conversation about a website redesign, someone might say, “We made over the entire interface to improve user experience.”
  • A fashion designer might talk about how they made over a vintage garment, saying, “I transformed the dress into a modern, trendy piece.”

30. Transformed

This term refers to the act of editing or modifying something in a way that completely alters its appearance, nature, or function. It suggests a profound and impactful transformation.

  • For example, “The artist transformed a plain canvas into a vibrant masterpiece.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “Traveling transformed my perspective on life.”
  • A filmmaker might describe their editing process as, “I transformed the raw footage into a compelling narrative.”

31. Overhauled

To completely redesign or renovate something, typically to improve its functionality or appearance. “Overhauled” is often used to describe a significant and thorough editing process.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I overhauled my manuscript to address the feedback from my editor.”
  • In a discussion about website design, someone might mention, “Our team overhauled the entire user interface to enhance the user experience.”
  • A filmmaker might describe their editing process by saying, “I overhauled the film to create a more cohesive narrative structure.”

32. Reimagined

To envision or conceive something in a new and innovative way. “Reimagined” is often used to describe a creative and imaginative approach to editing or modifying something.

  • For instance, a designer might say, “I reimagined the logo to give it a more modern and minimalist look.”
  • In a conversation about a classic novel adaptation, someone might comment, “The director reimagined the story in a contemporary setting.”
  • A musician might describe their remix of a song by saying, “I reimagined the original track by incorporating electronic elements.”

33. Patched

To make minor edits or repairs to something, typically to address specific issues or problems. “Patched” is often used to describe a quick and temporary editing solution.

  • For example, a software developer might say, “We patched the bug in the latest update.”
  • In a discussion about a leaking roof, someone might mention, “We patched the hole with a temporary fix until we can get it repaired.”
  • A photographer might describe their editing process by saying, “I patched up some minor blemishes in the image using editing software.”

34. Revitalized

To breathe new life into something, often through editing or reworking. “Revitalized” is often used to describe a process of rejuvenating or refreshing something that has become stale or outdated.

  • For instance, a business owner might say, “We revitalized our brand by updating our logo and website.”
  • In a conversation about a classic movie remake, someone might comment, “The director revitalized the story for a new generation of viewers.”
  • A chef might describe their updated recipe by saying, “I revitalized the traditional dish by adding a modern twist.”

35. Upgraded

To enhance or improve something by adding new features or making it more advanced. “Upgraded” is often used to describe a process of editing or modifying something to a higher standard.

  • For example, a technology enthusiast might say, “I upgraded my smartphone to the latest model for better performance.”
  • In a discussion about a computer system, someone might mention, “We upgraded the hardware to increase processing speed.”
  • A car enthusiast might describe their modified vehicle by saying, “I upgraded the engine and suspension for better performance on the track.”

36. Corrected

This term refers to making changes or adjustments to a piece of writing in order to improve its accuracy or clarity. “Corrected” implies that there were errors or mistakes that needed to be addressed.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please hand in your corrected essays by the end of the day.”
  • A writer might mention, “I just received the corrected proofs of my book.”
  • In a discussion about editing, someone might ask, “How do you approach the process of correcting your work?”

37. Redrafted

This slang term indicates that a piece of writing has been reworked or rewritten in order to improve its content or structure. “Redrafted” suggests a more significant overhaul compared to simply making corrections.

  • For instance, a novelist might say, “I had to redraft the entire first chapter of my book.”
  • A student might mention, “I’m in the process of redrafting my research paper to make it more focused.”
  • In a writing workshop, someone might ask, “How many times do you typically redraft a piece before you consider it finished?”

38. Restructured

This term refers to changing the arrangement or organization of a piece of writing in order to improve its flow or coherence. “Restructured” implies a deliberate effort to create a more logical or effective structure.

  • For example, an editor might suggest, “I think the article would benefit from being restructured to have a clearer progression of ideas.”
  • A writer might mention, “I’m in the process of restructuring my novel to have a different narrative structure.”
  • In a discussion about editing techniques, someone might ask, “What strategies do you use when you need to restructure a piece of writing?”
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