Top 44 Slang For Emerge – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying ahead of the curve with the latest lingo, knowing the slang for “emerge” can give you an edge in conversations. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to expand your vocabulary, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil a collection of trendy terms that will help you navigate the ever-evolving landscape of modern language with confidence and style. Get ready to level up your linguistic game and impress your peers with our curated list of “emerge” slang!

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1. Pop up

To “pop up” means to appear or emerge suddenly and unexpectedly.

  • For example, “I was walking in the park when a squirrel suddenly popped up from behind a tree.”
  • If a notification appears on your phone, you might say, “A message just popped up on my screen.”
  • In a conversation about surprise visits, someone might say, “My friend decided to pop up at my house unannounced.”

2. Surface

To “surface” means to rise or come up to the surface or become visible.

  • For instance, “After hours of searching, the missing diver finally surfaced.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “New evidence has recently surfaced, shedding light on the situation.”
  • If a long-lost item is found, someone might exclaim, “I can’t believe this old photo just surfaced!”

3. Show up

To “show up” means to arrive or make an appearance at a place or event.

  • For example, “I asked my friend to show up at the party, but they never came.”
  • If someone arrives unexpectedly, you might say, “I didn’t expect you to show up here!”
  • In a conversation about punctuality, someone might say, “It’s important to show up on time for interviews.”

4. Crop up

To “crop up” means to appear or happen unexpectedly or suddenly, often referring to a problem or issue.

  • For instance, “A few technical difficulties cropped up during the live stream.”
  • In a discussion about challenges, someone might say, “Unexpected obstacles always seem to crop up.”
  • If a recurring problem resurfaces, someone might say, “The same issue keeps cropping up, and we need to find a solution.”

5. Materialize

To “materialize” means to appear or become real or concrete.

  • For example, “After months of planning, the project finally materialized into a physical product.”
  • In a conversation about dreams, someone might say, “I hope my aspirations materialize one day.”
  • If a long-awaited opportunity presents itself, someone might exclaim, “My dream job just materialized out of nowhere!”

6. Come to light

This phrase is used to describe when something that was previously hidden or unknown becomes known or revealed.

  • For example, “The scandalous details of the politician’s affair came to light during the trial.”
  • In a news article, it might be written, “New evidence has come to light in the investigation.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to keep digging until the truth comes to light.”

7. Spring up

This phrase is used to describe something that appears or happens suddenly or unexpectedly.

  • For instance, “New businesses are springing up all over town.”
  • In a conversation about trends, someone might say, “A new fashion trend has sprung up among teenagers.”
  • A gardener might say, “Flowers spring up after a heavy rain.”

8. Rise up

This phrase is used to describe the act of coming into existence or prominence, often in a powerful or significant way.

  • For example, “A new political movement is rising up against the current government.”
  • In a discussion about social change, someone might say, “The oppressed will rise up and demand justice.”
  • A historian might say, “This period saw the rise up of many influential artists and thinkers.”

9. Break through

This phrase is used to describe the act of overcoming obstacles or barriers to achieve success or recognition.

  • For instance, “After years of hard work, she finally broke through and became a successful actress.”
  • In a motivational speech, someone might say, “Don’t give up, keep pushing until you break through.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “We can break through the defense and score a goal.”

10. Burst forth

This phrase is used to describe something that emerges suddenly and with great force or intensity.

  • For example, “The sun burst forth from behind the clouds, illuminating the landscape.”
  • In a description of a volcanic eruption, it might be written, “Lava burst forth from the volcano, creating a fiery spectacle.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to describe a character’s emotions, such as “Anger burst forth from within him.”

11. Come out

This phrase is often used to describe something or someone appearing or becoming visible. It can also be used metaphorically to describe someone revealing something about themselves.

  • For instance, “The sun came out from behind the clouds.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s sexuality, one might say, “He finally came out as gay.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe a secret being revealed, saying, “The truth about their relationship came out.”

12. Come into view

This phrase is used to describe something or someone becoming visible or entering one’s field of vision.

  • For example, “As I turned the corner, the beautiful scenery came into view.”
  • A person might say, “The ship came into view on the horizon.”
  • In a discussion about a missing person, one might say, “They suddenly came into view on the security camera footage.”

13. Step out

This phrase is often used to describe someone appearing or making an entrance, especially in a confident or noticeable way.

  • For instance, “She stepped out onto the stage and captivated the audience.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, one might say, “She always steps out in the most stylish outfits.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe someone making a bold move or taking a stand, saying, “He stepped out and spoke up against injustice.”

14. Come forth

This phrase is used to describe someone or something appearing or coming out from a hidden or secret place.

  • For example, “A rabbit came forth from the bushes.”
  • In a discussion about witnesses in a court case, one might say, “Several key witnesses have come forth with new information.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe someone revealing their true intentions, saying, “His true motives finally came forth.”

15. Emerge from the shadows

This phrase is often used to describe someone or something coming out from a dark or hidden place, both literally and metaphorically.

  • For instance, “The mysterious figure emerged from the shadows.”
  • In a conversation about someone overcoming a difficult situation, one might say, “She emerged from the shadows of her past and found success.”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe a new idea or trend gaining popularity, saying, “A new fashion trend has emerged from the shadows of the underground scene.”

16. Rise to the surface

This phrase is used to describe something that becomes visible or apparent after being hidden or unnoticed.

  • For example, “After hours of searching, the answer finally rose to the surface.”
  • In a conversation about a scandal, someone might say, “The truth will eventually rise to the surface.”
  • A detective might say, “We need to keep investigating until all the facts rise to the surface.”

17. Come up

This slang phrase is used to describe something that becomes known or comes into attention.

  • For instance, “A new opportunity has come up at work.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming events, someone might say, “What are the new trends that will come up in fashion?”
  • A friend might ask, “Anything interesting come up during your trip?”

18. Turn up

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that arrives or appears unexpectedly.

  • For example, “He didn’t RSVP, but he turned up at the party.”
  • In a conversation about missing items, someone might say, “I lost my keys, but they always turn up eventually.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did any new information turn up during the investigation?”

19. Present itself

This phrase is used to describe something that becomes evident or apparent.

  • For instance, “An opportunity to travel presented itself.”
  • In a discussion about challenges, someone might say, “Whenever a problem presents itself, we need to find a solution.”
  • A teacher might say, “Opportunities for growth and learning often present themselves in unexpected ways.”

20. Arise

This term is used to describe something that comes into existence or becomes noticeable.

  • For example, “A sudden issue arose during the meeting.”
  • In a conversation about difficulties, someone might say, “When challenges arise, we need to face them head-on.”
  • A parent might say, “It’s important to address any concerns as soon as they arise.”

21. Manifest

To become evident or noticeable.

  • For example, “The symptoms of the illness began to manifest after a few days.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might say, “The underlying issues will eventually manifest if left unaddressed.”
  • A person might describe their emotions as, “The excitement started to manifest as butterflies in my stomach.”

22. Resurface

To reappear or come to the surface again.

  • For instance, “After years of hiding, the old photos resurfaced during a spring cleaning.”
  • In a conversation about a past event, someone might say, “Memories from that trip resurfaced when I found this souvenir.”
  • A person might mention, “The feelings I thought were long gone suddenly resurfaced when I saw them again.”

23. Emerge

To come forth or become visible or known.

  • For example, “The sun emerged from behind the clouds, bathing the landscape in golden light.”
  • In a discussion about a new artist, someone might say, “She recently emerged as a talented singer-songwriter.”
  • A person might mention, “The truth will eventually emerge, no matter how hard someone tries to hide it.”

24. Be revealed

To become known or made public.

  • For instance, “The identity of the anonymous donor was finally revealed.”
  • In a conversation about a secret, someone might say, “The truth will eventually be revealed.”
  • A person might mention, “The hidden agenda behind their actions was finally revealed.”

25. Come to the fore

To become prominent or receive attention.

  • For example, “During the debate, her strong arguments came to the fore.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might say, “In times of crisis, true leaders come to the fore.”
  • A person might mention, “His talent for storytelling always comes to the fore during family gatherings.”

26. Come to the surface

This phrase means to become visible or known after being hidden or unknown.

  • For example, “The truth about the scandal finally came to the surface.”
  • In a conversation about a hidden talent, someone might say, “I never knew she could sing until it came to the surface.”
  • A news article might report, “New evidence has come to the surface in the investigation.”

27. Come out of the woodwork

This slang phrase means to appear or emerge unexpectedly or suddenly, often in large numbers.

  • For instance, “After winning the lottery, distant relatives came out of the woodwork asking for money.”
  • In a discussion about a popular trend, someone might say, “Everyone seems to be coming out of the woodwork to try it.”
  • A journalist might write, “Supporters of the candidate came out of the woodwork during the campaign.”

28. Burst onto the scene

This phrase means to make a sudden and noticeable entrance or debut, often with a significant impact or influence.

  • For example, “The young musician burst onto the scene with their debut album.”
  • In a conversation about a rising star, someone might say, “She burst onto the scene and quickly became a household name.”
  • A sports commentator might describe a new player as “bursting onto the scene with their exceptional skills.”
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29. Come to the forefront

This phrase means to become more visible, prominent, or important.

  • For instance, “With the new evidence, the issue has come to the forefront of public attention.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might say, “During times of crisis, true leaders come to the forefront.”
  • A business article might state, “Innovation and adaptability are key for companies to come to the forefront in today’s competitive market.”

30. Come to pass

This phrase means for something to occur or become a reality.

  • For example, “The predictions made by the fortune teller came to pass.”
  • In a conversation about a long-awaited event, someone might say, “The day has finally come to pass.”
  • A historian might write, “The events described in the ancient texts have indeed come to pass.”

31. Come to fruition

This phrase is used to describe something that has finally been accomplished or achieved. It implies that a plan or idea has reached its desired outcome or result.

  • For example, “After months of hard work, the project finally came to fruition.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been working on this business idea for years, and it’s finally starting to come to fruition.”
  • In a discussion about personal goals, someone might share, “My dream of becoming a published author has come to fruition with the release of my first book.”

32. Come into being

This phrase is used to describe the process of something coming into existence or coming into being. It implies that something has started to exist or has been created.

  • For instance, “The idea for the company came into being during a brainstorming session.”
  • A person might say, “The universe itself is believed to have come into being with the Big Bang.”
  • In a discussion about artistic creations, someone might comment, “The painting slowly came into being as the artist added layer after layer of color.”

33. Make itself known

This phrase is used to describe something that becomes evident or noticeable. It implies that something was previously hidden or unknown and has now revealed itself.

  • For example, “The truth about the scandal eventually made itself known to the public.”
  • A person might say, “When the symptoms of the illness started to appear, it was clear that something was making itself known.”
  • In a discussion about supernatural occurrences, someone might share, “The ghost in the house made itself known through strange noises and moving objects.”

34. Show its face

This phrase is used to describe something that becomes visible or apparent. It implies that something was previously hidden or concealed and has now become visible or known.

  • For instance, “The sun finally emerged from behind the clouds and showed its face.”
  • A person might say, “When the truth about the situation was revealed, the real culprit showed its face.”
  • In a discussion about a mysterious figure, someone might comment, “The masked thief finally showed his face during the daring heist.”

35. Come to the light

This phrase is used to describe something that becomes known or revealed. It implies that something was previously hidden or kept secret and has now come to light.

  • For example, “The scandalous affair eventually came to the light and caused a media frenzy.”
  • A person might say, “When the evidence was uncovered, the truth about the crime came to the light.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might share, “New documents have recently come to the light, shedding new light on the events of that time.”

36. Burst onto the stage

This phrase is often used to describe someone or something that enters a situation or becomes known in a very noticeable and impactful way.

  • For example, “The new singer burst onto the stage and captivated the audience with their powerful voice.”
  • In a discussion about rising stars, someone might say, “She burst onto the stage of the music industry and quickly became a sensation.”
  • A sports commentator might describe a rookie player’s impressive debut by saying, “He burst onto the stage and immediately made an impact on the game.”

37. Come out into the open

This phrase is often used to describe the act of making something previously hidden or secret known to others.

  • For instance, “The whistleblower decided to come out into the open and expose the corruption.”
  • In a conversation about personal struggles, someone might say, “It took a lot of courage for her to come out into the open about her mental health issues.”
  • A journalist might write, “The leaked documents allowed the truth to come out into the open and hold those responsible accountable.”

38. Rise from the ashes

This phrase is often used metaphorically to describe a person or thing that has experienced a downfall but manages to recover and thrive.

  • For example, “After facing bankruptcy, the company rose from the ashes and became even more successful than before.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “She went through a tough period but managed to rise from the ashes and rebuild her life.”
  • A motivational speaker might inspire others by saying, “No matter how many times you fall, you have the power to rise from the ashes and create a better future.”

39. Come into the light

This phrase is often used to describe the act of gaining recognition or becoming visible to others.

  • For instance, “The talented artist finally came into the light and received the recognition they deserved.”
  • In a conversation about undiscovered talent, someone might say, “There are so many talented musicians waiting to come into the light and be discovered.”
  • A writer might write, “Her groundbreaking research allowed a new perspective to come into the light and challenge existing theories.”

40. Come into sight

This phrase is often used to describe something that was previously hidden or difficult to see, but has now become visible or noticeable.

  • For example, “As the fog cleared, the beautiful landscape came into sight.”
  • In a discussion about wildlife, someone might say, “We patiently waited for the elusive bird to come into sight.”
  • A traveler might describe their experience by saying, “As I climbed the mountain, breathtaking views started to come into sight.”

41. Come on the scene

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that becomes visible or noticeable in a particular situation or context. It often implies that the person or thing has made a sudden or unexpected appearance.

  • For example, “The new singer really came on the scene with their debut album.”
  • In a discussion about a new technology, someone might say, “This innovation is about to come on the scene and revolutionize the industry.”
  • A journalist might report, “A new player has come on the scene and is shaking up the political landscape.”

42. Come into the open

This phrase is used to describe the act of revealing or making something known that was previously hidden or secret. It often implies a sense of transparency or honesty.

  • For instance, “The company finally came into the open about their unethical practices.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “It’s only a matter of time before the truth comes into the open.”
  • A whistleblower might say, “I decided to come into the open and expose the corruption I witnessed.”

43. Come into the picture

This phrase is used to describe the act of becoming involved or relevant in a particular situation or context. It often implies that someone or something was not previously considered or included.

  • For example, “Once the new evidence came into the picture, the case took a different turn.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to consider all the factors that come into the picture before making a decision.”
  • A friend might say, “I didn’t know you were interested in photography. When did that come into the picture?”

44. Come out in the open

This phrase is used to describe the act of revealing or making something public that was previously hidden or secret. It often implies a sense of courage or defiance.

  • For instance, “The celebrity decided to come out in the open about their struggle with mental health.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial issue, someone might say, “It’s time for the truth to come out in the open.”
  • A person might declare, “I’m tired of hiding. I’m ready to come out in the open and live my truth.”