Top 74 Slang For Employ – Meaning & Usage

In the fast-paced world of work and employment, staying up to date with the latest slang for employ can give you an edge in understanding workplace dynamics and communication. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or just starting out, we’ve got you covered with a curated list of the most relevant and trendy terms used in the job market today. Stay ahead of the game and level up your professional lingo with our comprehensive guide.

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1. Clock in

When you “clock in,” you are recording your arrival time at work. This term is often used in jobs where employees use a time clock to punch in and out of their shifts.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I forgot to clock in this morning, so my hours are off.”
  • A manager might remind their team, “Don’t forget to clock in before you start your shift.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “What time do you usually clock in?”

2. Punch the clock

Similar to “clocking in,” “punching the clock” refers to the act of recording your arrival or departure time at work. This term is often used in jobs where employees physically punch a time card or use a time clock.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “I can’t wait to punch the clock and go home.”
  • A supervisor might announce, “It’s time to punch the clock and get to work.”
  • In a conversation about work hours, someone might mention, “I have to punch the clock at 8 am sharp.”

3. On the job

When someone is “on the job,” it means they are actively working or performing work-related tasks.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “I can’t chat right now, I’m on the job.”
  • A supervisor might ask, “Are you on the job or taking a break?”
  • In a discussion about work responsibilities, someone might mention, “I have a lot to do while I’m on the job today.”

4. On the grind

To be “on the grind” means to be consistently and diligently working towards a goal or completing tasks. It often implies a strong work ethic and dedication.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “I’ve been on the grind all day trying to meet this deadline.”
  • A friend might ask, “How’s the new job? Are you on the grind?”
  • In a conversation about productivity, someone might mention, “I need to get back on the grind and finish this project.”

5. Gainfully employed

Being “gainfully employed” means having a job that pays a steady income and provides financial stability.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m finally gainfully employed after months of searching.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Make sure you find a career where you can be gainfully employed.”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, someone might mention, “I may not love my job, but at least I’m gainfully employed.”

6. On the clock

This phrase refers to the time when someone is actively working and being paid for their time. It is often used to indicate that someone is currently busy with their job.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Are you free for a meeting?” and the person is busy working, they might respond, “Sorry, I’m on the clock right now.”
  • In a retail setting, a manager might remind employees, “Remember, you represent the company when you’re on the clock.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Are you on the clock yet? I need some help with this project.”

7. Nine-to-fiver

This term refers to someone who works a standard nine-to-five job or has a typical office job with set working hours.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “What do you do for a living?” and the person has a regular office job, they might respond, “I’m just a nine-to-fiver.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might say, “I envy those nine-to-fivers who have weekends off.”
  • A friend might joke, “I can’t believe you’re still a nine-to-fiver. When are you going to quit and start your own business?”

8. Wage slave

This term is used to describe someone who feels trapped or controlled by their job, particularly when they are being paid a low wage.

  • For example, someone might say, “I hate being a wage slave. I work so hard for such little pay.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might argue, “The system is designed to keep the majority of workers as wage slaves.”
  • A person venting about their job might say, “I’m tired of being a wage slave. I deserve better compensation for my hard work.”

9. Breadwinner

This term refers to the person in a household who earns the main income and financially supports the family or household.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My dad is the breadwinner in our family. He works long hours to provide for us.”
  • In a conversation about gender roles, someone might argue, “The concept of the breadwinner is outdated. Both partners should contribute to the household income.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you the breadwinner in your relationship? How does that affect your dynamics?”

10. Working stiff

This term is used to describe someone who works hard and puts in a lot of effort in their job.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “John may not have a fancy title, but he’s a real working stiff. He always gets things done.”
  • In a conversation about career advancement, someone might say, “Sometimes, being a working stiff is overlooked. We need to recognize and reward hard work.”
  • A friend might comment, “I admire your work ethic. You’re a true working stiff.”

11. Grunt

This term is often used to refer to a low-ranking or entry-level employee. It can also imply someone who performs repetitive or manual labor.

  • For example, in a conversation about office dynamics, someone might say, “The grunts are responsible for most of the day-to-day tasks.”
  • In a military context, a superior might say, “I need a couple of grunts to help with the heavy lifting.”
  • A disgruntled employee might vent, “I’m tired of being treated like a grunt around here.”

12. Bread and butter

This phrase is used to describe one’s primary source of income or the main aspect of their job that sustains them financially.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Freelancing is great, but my full-time job is my bread and butter.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, a person might ask, “What’s your bread and butter profession?”
  • A self-employed individual might explain, “I have a few side projects, but my consulting work is my bread and butter.”

13. Jobholder

This term simply refers to someone who holds a job or is employed.

  • For example, in a conversation about workplace demographics, someone might say, “The majority of jobholders in this company are millennials.”
  • In a discussion about job satisfaction, a person might ask, “Are you a happy jobholder?”
  • A recruiter might use the term when describing a candidate, “We’re looking for experienced jobholders with strong leadership skills.”

14. Employee

An individual who is hired by a company or organization to perform specific tasks or job responsibilities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been an employee at this company for five years.”
  • In a conversation about workplace benefits, a person might ask, “Do employees have access to a retirement plan?”
  • A manager might address their team, saying, “I want to thank each and every employee for their hard work.”

15. Staff member

This term is often used interchangeably with “employee” and refers to an individual who is part of a company or organization’s staff.

  • For example, in a discussion about team dynamics, someone might say, “We have a great group of staff members who work well together.”
  • In a conversation about company policies, a person might ask, “Are staff members allowed to work remotely?”
  • A supervisor might address their team, saying, “I appreciate all of our staff members for their dedication and commitment.”

16. Working nine to five

– For example, “I’m tired of working nine to five. I want more flexibility in my schedule.”

  • A person might say, “I’ve been working nine to five for years, and it’s become a routine.”
  • One might complain, “Working nine to five doesn’t leave much time for personal hobbies or interests.”

17. Holding down a job

– For instance, “He’s been holding down a job at the same company for over a decade.”

  • A person might say, “I’m proud of holding down a job and being able to support myself.”
  • One might advise, “If you want to succeed in your career, you need to demonstrate the ability to hold down a job.”

18. Putting in work

– For example, “She’s been putting in work to meet the project deadline.”

  • A person might say, “I’m putting in work to advance in my career and achieve my goals.”
  • One might encourage, “If you want to succeed, you need to put in the work and go the extra mile.”

19. Bringing home the bacon

– For instance, “He works hard to bring home the bacon and support his family.”

  • A person might say, “I need to find a job that allows me to bring home the bacon.”
  • One might brag, “I’m the main breadwinner in my household. I bring home the bacon.”

20. Making ends meet

– For example, “With my current job, I’m barely making ends meet.”

  • A person might say, “I need to find a way to make ends meet and improve my financial situation.”
  • One might express frustration, “It’s a constant struggle to make ends meet with rising costs of living.”

21. Working for a living

This phrase refers to the act of engaging in employment to earn a living.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been working for a living ever since I graduated college.”
  • In a conversation about different career paths, a person might mention, “I chose a career in healthcare because I wanted to be working for a living in a field that helps others.”
  • Another person might say, “Working for a living is important, but it’s also crucial to find a job that brings you fulfillment.”

22. Working the daily grind

This phrase describes the repetitive and often tiresome nature of daily work.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I wake up, go to the office, and spend the whole day working the daily grind.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, a person might express their frustration by saying, “I feel like I’m stuck in the daily grind and don’t have time for anything else.”
  • Another person might comment, “Working the daily grind can be tough, but finding small joys in your routine can make a big difference.”

23. Punching the time clock

This phrase refers to the act of using a time clock or time-tracking system to record one’s attendance and hours worked.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been punching the time clock at my job for over 10 years now.”
  • In a discussion about workplace policies, a person might mention, “Some companies have moved away from punching the time clock and instead use electronic timekeeping systems.”
  • Another person might say, “Punching the time clock is a necessary part of my job, but it’s satisfying to see my hours add up.”

24. Putting food on the table

This phrase refers to the act of working to earn enough money to support oneself and one’s family.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I work two jobs to make sure I can put food on the table for my kids.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, a person might comment, “Putting food on the table is a top priority, and I’m grateful to have a job that allows me to do that.”
  • Another person might say, “No matter how tough things get, I’ll do whatever it takes to keep putting food on the table.”

25. Holding a job

This phrase simply means having a job or being employed.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been holding a job at the same company for five years.”
  • In a discussion about career changes, a person might mention, “I’m considering leaving my current job and holding a job in a different industry.”
  • Another person might comment, “Holding a job is important for financial stability, but it’s also crucial to find fulfillment in your work.”

26. Gainful work

This term refers to any form of work that provides a person with a regular income or salary. It emphasizes the aspect of earning money through employment.

  • For example, a person might say, “I finally found gainful work after months of searching.”
  • In a conversation about job prospects, someone might ask, “Are you looking for gainful work or just a temporary gig?”
  • A job seeker might mention, “I’m open to any gainful work opportunities in the tech industry.”

27. Bringing home the dough

This phrase is a lighthearted way of saying someone is earning money through their job or occupation. It highlights the idea of bringing home a paycheck.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I work hard all day to bring home the dough.”
  • In a discussion about financial stability, someone might comment, “It’s important to have a steady job that brings home the dough.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I have to go to work and bring home the dough so we can have a nice dinner tonight.”

28. Office drone

This term is used to describe someone who works in an office setting and performs repetitive or mundane tasks. It implies a lack of creativity or fulfillment in their job.

  • For example, a person might say, “I feel like such an office drone, doing the same thing every day.”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, someone might ask, “Are you content being an office drone or do you want something more fulfilling?”
  • A disgruntled employee might vent, “I’m tired of being just another office drone. I want a job that challenges me.”

29. Cubicle jockey

This term refers to someone who works in an office and spends most of their time in a cubicle. It emphasizes the physical space where they work.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’ve been a cubicle jockey for years, but I’m ready for a change.”
  • In a discussion about office environments, someone might comment, “Being a cubicle jockey can feel isolating at times.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Are you still a cubicle jockey or have you moved up to a corner office?”

30. Grindstone

This term is used to describe the act of working diligently and persistently. It emphasizes the idea of putting in effort and focusing on tasks.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve been putting my nose to the grindstone to meet the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about work ethic, someone might comment, “Success comes to those who keep their nose to the grindstone.”
  • A manager might encourage their team by saying, “Let’s all put our shoulders to the grindstone and finish this project on time.”

31. Bring home the bacon

This phrase means to earn money or provide for one’s family. It is often used to talk about being the primary breadwinner in a household.

  • For example, someone might say, “I work two jobs to bring home the bacon.”
  • In a discussion about financial responsibility, one might say, “It’s important to work hard and bring home the bacon.”
  • A parent might say, “I work long hours to bring home the bacon and support my kids.”

32. Workaholic

This term refers to a person who is excessively dedicated to their work and has an obsession with working long hours.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m a workaholic and I can’t seem to take a break.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, one might say, “I used to be a workaholic, but I’ve learned to prioritize my personal life.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You’re such a workaholic, you never have time for anything else!”

33. Pulling a paycheck

This phrase means to receive payment for one’s work, typically in the form of a paycheck.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been pulling a paycheck from this company for years.”
  • In a discussion about job satisfaction, one might say, “I don’t love my job, but at least I’m pulling a paycheck.”
  • A person might ask, “Are you still pulling a paycheck from that job?”

34. Salaried employee

This term refers to someone who is paid a fixed amount of money on a regular basis, typically on a monthly or annual basis, rather than being paid by the hour.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m a salaried employee, so I don’t get paid overtime.”
  • In a conversation about job benefits, one might say, “Being a salaried employee comes with certain perks.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Are you a salaried employee or an hourly employee?”

35. Wage earner

This term refers to a person who is paid for their work on an hourly basis, rather than receiving a fixed salary.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m a wage earner, so I get paid based on the number of hours I work.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, one might say, “Wage earners often struggle to make ends meet.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you a wage earner or a salaried employee?”

36. Bread and honey

This slang term refers to earning a living or making money. It implies that having “bread and honey” allows one to live comfortably or enjoy the finer things in life.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to find a new job so I can start making some bread and honey.”
  • In a conversation about financial success, a person might ask, “How can I start earning some serious bread and honey?”
  • A friend might congratulate another on their promotion by saying, “Looks like you’ll be making some sweet bread and honey now!”

37. Bread and jam

This slang term refers to employment or a source of income. It suggests that having a “bread and jam” means having a stable job or means of making a living.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to find a bread and jam to pay the bills.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, a person might ask, “What’s your bread and jam?”
  • A friend might offer advice to someone struggling to find a job by saying, “Don’t worry, you’ll find your bread and jam soon enough.”

38. Bread and cheese

This slang term refers to the amount of money one earns from their job. It implies that having a “bread and cheese” means having a sufficient salary or income.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m looking for a new job with better bread and cheese.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, a person might ask, “Is your bread and cheese enough to cover your expenses?”
  • A friend might comment on another’s promotion by saying, “Congratulations on the raise! Your bread and cheese just got better.”

39. Bread and water

This slang term refers to being without a job or source of income. It implies that having only “bread and water” means struggling to make ends meet or living in a state of poverty.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I lost my job and now I’m stuck with just bread and water.”
  • In a discussion about financial hardship, a person might ask, “How long can you survive on just bread and water?”
  • A friend might express concern for someone who recently became unemployed by saying, “I hope you find a new job soon and don’t have to rely on bread and water for long.”

40. Bread and salt

This slang term refers to the stability and security one feels in their job. It implies that having “bread and salt” means having a reliable and secure source of income.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m grateful for my bread and salt in this uncertain economy.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, a person might ask, “Are you willing to sacrifice bread and salt for a more fulfilling job?”
  • A friend might reassure someone who is worried about job security by saying, “You’ve been with the company for years, I think your bread and salt is safe.”

41. Bread and meat

This slang term refers to the money earned from employment, specifically the income used to provide for basic necessities such as food (bread) and other essential expenses (meat). It highlights the importance of earning a living.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to find a job that pays enough bread and meat to support my family.”
  • In a conversation about finances, a person might mention, “I’m struggling to make enough bread and meat to cover my bills.”
  • A friend might ask, “How’s your new job? Are you making good bread and meat?”

42. Bread and wine

This slang term refers to the rewards and benefits that come with a successful career. It symbolizes abundance and enjoyment, similar to the indulgence of bread and wine in a celebratory feast.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m working hard to achieve bread and wine in my profession.”
  • In a discussion about career goals, a person might express, “My ultimate aim is to reach a level where I can enjoy the bread and wine of success.”
  • A colleague might congratulate another on a promotion, saying, “Well done! You’ve earned your bread and wine.”

43. Bread and circuses

This slang term refers to the various forms of entertainment and distractions that employers provide to keep employees satisfied and content. It suggests that these distractions are used as a means to prevent employees from questioning or challenging the status quo.

  • For example, someone might say, “The company offers free snacks and games as bread and circuses to keep employees from focusing on larger issues.”
  • In a conversation about workplace culture, a person might mention, “The management uses bread and circuses to create an illusion of employee satisfaction.”
  • A disgruntled employee might comment, “Don’t let the bread and circuses distract you from the real problems in this company.”

44. Nine-to-five

This term refers to the typical work schedule of many employees, where they work from 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday. It represents the conventional work hours of a full-time job.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m tired of the nine-to-five grind. I want a more flexible schedule.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, a person might express, “I prefer jobs that offer more flexibility than the traditional nine-to-five.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you still working the nine-to-five or have you found a job with different hours?”

45. Cubicle warrior

This slang term refers to an employee who works diligently and tirelessly in an office setting, often in a cubicle. It portrays someone who is dedicated, hardworking, and willing to face the challenges of office life.

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s a true cubicle warrior, always putting in extra hours to get the job done.”
  • In a conversation about office dynamics, a person might mention, “The cubicle warriors are the backbone of this company.”
  • A manager might commend an employee, saying, “You’re a valuable cubicle warrior. Your dedication is noticed and appreciated.”

46. Bean counter

This term refers to someone who works with numbers, particularly in the field of finance or accounting. It can be used both affectionately and derogatorily.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to talk to the bean counter about my taxes.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about careers, a person might joke, “I’m definitely not cut out to be a bean counter.”
  • Another might say, “Don’t underestimate the importance of bean counters in keeping businesses running smoothly.”

47. Pencil pusher

This term is often used to describe someone who works in a bureaucratic or administrative role, typically involving a lot of paperwork and desk work. It can carry a negative connotation, suggesting a lack of excitement or creativity in the job.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m tired of being a pencil pusher. I want a job that’s more hands-on.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, a person might say, “I don’t want to be stuck behind a desk as a pencil pusher.”
  • Another might say, “Pencil pushers play an important role in keeping things organized and running smoothly in an office setting.”

48. Suit

This term is used to refer to someone who works in the business world, particularly in a corporate or executive role. It can be used both neutrally and pejoratively, often implying a focus on appearance and conformity.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m tired of dealing with suits. They’re out of touch with the realities of the workforce.”
  • In a conversation about different career paths, a person might say, “I don’t want to be stuck wearing a suit every day.”
  • Another might say, “Suits often have a wealth of experience and knowledge in the business world.”

49. Freelancer

This term refers to someone who works on a project basis for various clients, rather than being employed by a single company. Freelancers typically have more flexibility in their work arrangements but may also face challenges such as inconsistent income.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m thinking of becoming a freelancer so I can have more control over my schedule.”
  • In a conversation about different types of employment, a person might say, “Freelancers often have to hustle for their next gig.”
  • Another might say, “Freelancing can be a great option for those who value autonomy and variety in their work.”

50. Contractor

This term refers to someone who is hired by a client to perform specific work or services on a contractual basis. Contractors may work independently or as part of a larger organization, and they are typically responsible for their own taxes and benefits.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to hire a contractor to remodel my kitchen.”
  • In a conversation about home renovations, a person might say, “Contractors often have specialized skills that are essential for certain projects.”
  • Another might say, “Contracting can offer more flexibility and potentially higher income compared to traditional employment.”

51. Temp

A temporary worker is someone who is hired for a specific period of time or to complete a specific project. “Temp” is a shortened form of “temporary” and is commonly used in the workplace.

  • For example, “I’m working as a temp at the office until they hire someone full-time.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you enjoying your temp job?”
  • In a conversation about job security, someone might say, “I prefer a permanent position over being a temp.”

52. Gig worker

A gig worker is someone who works on a freelance or contract basis, taking on individual jobs or “gigs” rather than being employed by a single company. The term “gig worker” is often used to refer to individuals in the gig economy.

  • For instance, “I’m a gig worker, so I have the flexibility to choose the projects I take on.”
  • A gig worker might say, “I’m juggling multiple gigs right now to make ends meet.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might mention, “Gig workers often have more control over their schedules.”

53. Staffer

A staffer is a term used to refer to an employee, typically within a specific organization or company. The term is often used in political or government contexts, but it can also be used more broadly.

  • For example, “I’m a staffer at a nonprofit organization.”
  • A colleague might introduce themselves as, “Hi, I’m a new staffer in the marketing department.”
  • In a conversation about office dynamics, someone might say, “The staffers in this company are really dedicated to their work.”

54. Laborer

A laborer is someone who performs physical or manual work, often in industries such as construction, manufacturing, or agriculture. The term “laborer” emphasizes the physical nature of the work being done.

  • For instance, “He’s a skilled laborer, specializing in carpentry.”
  • A laborer might say, “I enjoy being a laborer because I get to see the tangible results of my work.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, someone might mention, “There’s a high demand for skilled laborers in the construction industry.”

55. Hand

In the context of employment, “hand” is a term used to refer to an assistant or helper. The term is often used in industries such as hospitality or entertainment.

  • For example, “I work as a hand for a famous magician.”
  • A coworker might say, “Can you lend me a hand with this task?”
  • In a conversation about event planning, someone might mention, “We’ll need a few extra hands to set up for the conference.”

56. Slogger

A slang term used to describe someone who works extremely hard or puts in a lot of effort. It implies that the person is dedicated and willing to put in long hours to get the job done.

  • For example, “John is a real slogger. He’s always the first one in the office and the last one to leave.”
  • In a conversation about work ethic, someone might say, “You need to be a slogger if you want to succeed in this industry.”
  • A boss might compliment an employee by saying, “You’ve been a slogger this week. Keep up the good work!”

57. Sapper

A term used to describe someone who is skilled at finding solutions to difficult or complex problems. It suggests that the person is resourceful and capable of overcoming challenges.

  • For instance, “Jane is a sapper. Whenever we encounter a problem, she always comes up with a creative solution.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We need a sapper to figure out how to meet this deadline.”
  • A coworker might ask for help by saying, “I’m stuck on this project. Can you sapper it for me?”

58. Earner

A slang term used to refer to someone who earns money through employment. It implies that the person is responsible for financially supporting themselves or their family.

  • For example, “My dad is the main earner in our household. He works long hours to provide for us.”
  • In a conversation about finances, someone might ask, “Who is the primary earner in your family?”
  • A friend might share, “I recently became the sole earner in my household. It’s been a big adjustment.”

59. Labor force

A term used to describe the total number of people who are employed or actively seeking employment in a particular country or region. It refers to the collective workforce of a nation.

  • For instance, “The labor force in the United States is constantly evolving and adapting to changes in the economy.”
  • In an economic discussion, someone might say, “The size and composition of the labor force have significant implications for government policies.”
  • A news article might report, “The labor force participation rate has been steadily increasing over the past decade.”

60. Workforce

A term used to refer to the total number of people who are employed by a particular company or organization. It includes both full-time and part-time employees.

  • For example, “Our company has a diverse workforce, with employees from different backgrounds and skill sets.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might discuss, “We need to optimize our workforce to improve productivity.”
  • A manager might evaluate the performance of the workforce by saying, “Our workforce has been consistently meeting targets and delivering high-quality work.”

61. Staff

This term refers to the group of people employed by a company or organization. It can also be used to refer to a specific department or division within a company.

  • For example, “The staff at this restaurant is always friendly and attentive.”
  • In a discussion about company structure, someone might say, “The marketing staff is responsible for promoting the brand.”
  • A manager might ask, “Does the staff have any suggestions for improving efficiency?”

62. Personnel

This term is used to collectively refer to the individuals who work for a company or organization. It can also be used to refer to the department responsible for managing and overseeing employees.

  • For instance, “The personnel department is in charge of hiring and training new employees.”
  • In a conversation about company culture, someone might say, “Our personnel are the backbone of our organization.”
  • A supervisor might ask, “Have all personnel been properly informed about the new policies?”

63. Crew

This term refers to a group of people who work together on a specific task or project. It can also be used to refer to the employees who work together on a regular basis, such as a flight crew or a film crew.

  • For example, “The crew responsible for setting up the event did a fantastic job.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “Our crew works together seamlessly to achieve our goals.”
  • A manager might ask, “Does the crew need any additional resources to complete the project?”

64. Team

This term is used to refer to a group of people who work together to achieve a common goal. It can also be used to describe a specific department or division within a company.

  • For instance, “The sales team is responsible for meeting the company’s revenue targets.”
  • In a conversation about collaboration, someone might say, “Our team works together to find innovative solutions.”
  • A team leader might ask, “Does the team have any concerns or suggestions for improvement?”

65. Workmate

This term refers to a person who works with you in the same organization or company. It can also be used to describe a coworker or someone you collaborate with on a regular basis.

  • For example, “I have a great relationship with my workmates.”
  • In a discussion about office dynamics, someone might say, “It’s important to establish trust and open communication with your workmates.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Do you want to grab lunch with some of our workmates?”

66. Colleague

A colleague is someone you work with, usually in the same organization or department. The term “workmate” is often used interchangeably with “colleague” to refer to someone you collaborate with or share work responsibilities.

  • For example, “I have a meeting with my colleagues tomorrow to discuss the project.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, one might say, “It’s important to have good communication with your workmates.”
  • A person might introduce their colleague by saying, “This is my workmate, Sarah.”

67. Coworker

A coworker is someone you work with, usually in the same organization or department. The term “workmate” is often used interchangeably with “coworker” to refer to someone you collaborate with or share work responsibilities.

  • For example, “I’m going out for lunch with my coworkers.”
  • In a discussion about office dynamics, one might say, “Getting along with your workmates can make the work environment more enjoyable.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any workmates you can rely on for help?”

68. Office mate

An office mate is someone you share an office space with, usually in a professional setting. The term “desk mate” is often used interchangeably with “office mate” to refer to someone who shares a desk or workspace with you.

  • For instance, “I’m sharing an office with my office mate, John.”
  • In a conversation about office layout, one might say, “Having a good relationship with your desk mate can make the workday more pleasant.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you and your office mate have similar work schedules?”

69. Work buddy

A work buddy is someone you have a friendly or close relationship with at work. The term “work partner” is often used interchangeably with “work buddy” to refer to someone you collaborate with or rely on for support.

  • For example, “I’m going to grab coffee with my work buddy during our break.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, one might say, “Having a reliable work partner can make projects run smoother.”
  • A person might introduce their work buddy by saying, “This is my work partner, Alex.”

70. Work pal

A work pal is someone you consider a friend in the workplace. The term “work friend” is often used interchangeably with “work pal” to refer to someone you have a positive and friendly relationship with at work.

  • For instance, “I’m going to a happy hour with my work pals.”
  • In a conversation about office culture, one might say, “Having work friends can make the work environment more enjoyable.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any work pals you can talk to about non-work-related topics?”

71. Work companion

A work companion refers to someone you work with or collaborate with on a regular basis. It can also imply a friendly relationship with a coworker.

  • For example, you might say, “My work companion and I always grab lunch together.”
  • In a conversation about office dynamics, someone might mention, “Having a good work companion can make the workday more enjoyable.”
  • If someone asks about your relationship with a colleague, you could respond, “We’re work companions who support each other in our projects.”

72. Work associate

A work associate refers to someone you are professionally connected to or work alongside. It can imply a formal or business-oriented relationship.

  • For instance, you might introduce someone by saying, “This is my work associate, John.”
  • In a discussion about networking, someone might advise, “Building a strong network of work associates can open doors for future opportunities.”
  • If someone asks about your role in a project, you might respond, “I’m a work associate responsible for managing the budget.”

73. Work friend

A work friend is a colleague with whom you have developed a friendship. It implies a level of camaraderie and social connection beyond just working together.

  • For example, you might say, “I’m lucky to have work friends who make the office feel like a second home.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “Having work friends can make stressful days more bearable.”
  • If someone asks about your plans after work, you could respond, “I’m meeting up with some work friends for happy hour.”

74. Work partner

A work partner refers to someone you collaborate with closely on projects or tasks. It implies a level of teamwork and shared responsibilities.

  • For instance, you might say, “My work partner and I have been working together for years.”
  • In a discussion about effective teamwork, someone might highlight, “Having a reliable work partner can lead to better outcomes.”
  • If someone asks about your role in a team, you might respond, “I’m a work partner responsible for coordinating project timelines.”
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