Top 35 Slang For Engage – Meaning & Usage

Engagement is a vital aspect of communication in today’s digital age, and keeping up with the latest slang for “engage” can help you connect with others in a fun and relatable way. From social media to everyday conversations, our team has curated a list of the top slang terms for engage that are sure to make you sound hip and in-the-know. So, get ready to level up your communication game and dive into this listicle to discover the coolest ways to engage with others!

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1. Lock in

To “lock in” means to commit to or finalize plans. It can also refer to securing a spot or position.

  • For example, someone might say, “Let’s lock in a date for the party.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We need to lock in our strategy for the project.”
  • A person trying to secure concert tickets might say, “I need to lock in my spot in line.”

2. Get in on

To “get in on” means to participate or join in on something. It implies wanting to be included or involved in an activity or opportunity.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Hey, do you want to get in on this game?”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can I get in on that project you’re working on?”
  • A person interested in investing might say, “I want to get in on the ground floor of this startup.”

To “link up” means to connect or meet up with someone. It can refer to physically meeting in person or connecting online.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Let’s link up for lunch tomorrow.”
  • A person organizing a group outing might ask, “Who wants to link up at the park?”
  • Someone trying to reconnect with an old friend might say, “I’d love to link up and catch up sometime.”

4. Throw down

To “throw down” means to engage in a challenge or competition. It implies a willingness to compete or prove oneself.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I challenge you to throw down in a game of basketball.”
  • In a video game tournament, a player might say, “I’m ready to throw down and show off my skills.”
  • A group of friends might decide to throw down in a friendly cooking competition.

5. Dive in

To “dive in” means to immerse oneself or start something enthusiastically. It implies a willingness to fully engage or commit to a task or activity.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to dive in and start working on this project.”
  • Someone starting a new hobby might say, “I can’t wait to dive in and learn all about it.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “Just dive in and give it your best shot.”

6. Step up

To “step up” means to take action or assume responsibility in a situation. It often implies going above and beyond what is expected or required.

  • For example, in a group project, someone might say, “We need someone to step up and take the lead.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “It’s time to step up and show what you’re capable of.”
  • A manager might say to an employee, “I need you to step up and take on more responsibility in this project.”

7. Plug in

To “plug in” means to connect or engage with something, usually in a digital or technological sense. It can also refer to actively participating or involving oneself in a situation or conversation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Don’t forget to plug in your phone to charge.”
  • In a meeting, a participant might say, “I’d like to plug in and share my thoughts on this topic.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “Make sure to plug in and participate in the classroom discussion.”

8. Get involved

To “get involved” means to participate or engage in an activity or cause. It often implies taking an active role and contributing to the success or progress of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I want to get involved in volunteering to make a difference in my community.”
  • In a political context, a person might say, “It’s important for citizens to get involved in the democratic process.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students, “I want to see all of you get involved in the class project.”

9. Jump on

To “jump on” means to quickly join or participate in something. It implies taking immediate action and not missing out on an opportunity or event.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going to jump on the bandwagon and try out this new trend.”
  • In a social context, a person might say, “Let’s jump on the opportunity to go to that concert together.”
  • A colleague might say, “I heard there’s a job opening in another department. I’m going to jump on that opportunity.”

10. Sign up

To “sign up” means to enroll or register for something. It often implies committing to participate or be involved in a specific activity or event.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to sign up for a yoga class to improve my flexibility.”
  • In a volunteer context, a person might say, “I signed up to help at the local food bank.”
  • A friend might encourage you, “You should sign up for that cooking competition. You have a talent for it.”

11. Take part

This phrase means to participate or join in an activity or event. It emphasizes actively involving oneself in the action or discussion.

  • For example, “I’m excited to take part in the charity run this weekend.”
  • During a team meeting, a colleague might say, “We encourage everyone to take part and share their ideas.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Don’t be afraid to take part in class discussions and ask questions.”

12. Get on board

This phrase means to join or become involved in a particular project, idea, or endeavor. It implies a willingness to support or be part of something.

  • For instance, “We need more people to get on board with our environmental initiatives.”
  • A manager might say, “We have a new marketing strategy. I hope everyone will get on board.”
  • A friend might encourage you by saying, “Come on, get on board with our plan for the weekend!”

13. Lock horns

This phrase refers to engaging in a heated argument or disagreement with someone. It conveys the idea of two parties opposing each other and clashing in a debate or conflict.

  • For example, “The two politicians locked horns during the debate over healthcare.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “The rival teams are about to lock horns in a fierce competition.”
  • A friend might warn you, “Be careful not to lock horns with your boss over that issue.”

14. Get in the game

This phrase means to actively engage or participate in a particular activity or situation. It suggests getting involved and making an effort to contribute.

  • For instance, “If you want to succeed, you need to get in the game and start taking action.”
  • A coach might encourage their team by saying, “It’s time to step up and get in the game!”
  • A friend might motivate you by saying, “Stop watching from the sidelines and get in the game!”

15. Throw yourself into

This phrase means to wholeheartedly and enthusiastically engage in an activity or task. It implies giving one’s full effort and attention to the task at hand.

  • For example, “She threw herself into her new job and quickly became a valued employee.”
  • A teacher might advise their students, “If you want to succeed in this class, you need to throw yourself into the material.”
  • A parent might encourage their child by saying, “Don’t hold back, throw yourself into your passion and pursue it with all your heart!”

16. Participate

To actively join or be involved in a particular activity or event.

  • For example, “Don’t just watch the game, participate and cheer for your team!”
  • In a classroom setting, a teacher might say, “Make sure to participate in the discussion by sharing your thoughts and ideas.”
  • A team leader might encourage their members by saying, “Everyone needs to participate and contribute to the project to ensure its success.”

17. Connect

To form a bond or establish a relationship with someone or something.

  • For instance, “I really connected with the main character of the book.”
  • In a networking event, a person might say, “I’m here to connect with professionals in my field.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s go grab coffee and connect on a deeper level.”

18. Involve oneself

To actively engage or participate in a particular activity or situation.

  • For example, “If you want to make a difference, you need to involve yourself in community service.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “It’s important to involve oneself in the democratic process by voting.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “Don’t be afraid to involve yourself in extracurricular activities to enhance your learning experience.”

19. Engross oneself

To fully engage or become absorbed in something, usually an activity or a topic.

  • For instance, “I love this book so much that I can engross myself in it for hours.”
  • In a conversation about hobbies, someone might say, “I enjoy painting because it allows me to engross myself in the creative process.”
  • A person might recommend, “If you want to learn a new language, engross yourself in the culture and practice speaking as much as possible.”

20. Show up

To attend or be physically present at a particular place or event.

  • For example, “If you want to make a good impression, always show up on time.”
  • In a discussion about commitment, someone might say, “Half the battle is just showing up.”
  • A friend might remind another friend, “Don’t forget to show up for my birthday party tonight.”

21. Contribute

To contribute means to add value or participate actively in a discussion, project, or event. It implies actively sharing ideas, insights, or resources.

  • For example, “Feel free to contribute your thoughts to the conversation.”
  • In a team meeting, a participant might say, “I can contribute my expertise in this area.”
  • A community member might offer, “I’d like to contribute some funds to support this cause.”

22. Be present

To be present means to actively participate or engage in the current moment or situation. It implies being fully attentive and involved.

  • For instance, a speaker might say, “I encourage everyone to be present and engaged throughout the workshop.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might advise, “Put away your phone and be present with the people around you.”
  • A mindfulness coach might teach, “Being present means focusing on the here and now, without judgment.”

23. Engage with

To engage with means to interact or connect with someone or something. It implies actively participating in a conversation or relationship.

  • For example, “It’s important to engage with your audience on social media.”
  • In a business context, a professional might say, “I need to engage with my clients to understand their needs.”
  • A teacher might encourage students, “Don’t be afraid to engage with the material and ask questions.”

24. Be part of the action

To be part of the action means to actively participate in an event or activity. It implies being involved and engaged in the action or excitement.

  • For instance, “Come join us and be part of the action at the music festival.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “We need everyone to be part of the action and give their best.”
  • A friend might invite, “Don’t just watch, be part of the action and join us on the dance floor.”

25. Throw oneself into the mix

To throw oneself into the mix means to immerse oneself fully in a situation or activity. It implies wholeheartedly engaging and participating without holding back.

  • For example, “She threw herself into the mix and gave her all in the performance.”
  • In a group project, a team member might say, “Let’s all throw ourselves into the mix and make this a success.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage, “Don’t be afraid to throw yourself into the mix and pursue your dreams.”

26. Join the fray

This phrase means to actively participate or become involved in a situation, usually a conflict or competition. It implies joining a group or taking action alongside others.

  • For example, during a heated debate, someone might say, “I’m going to join the fray and share my opinion.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might encourage their team by saying, “It’s time to join the fray and give it your all.”
  • A colleague might ask for help by saying, “We need someone to join the fray and assist with this project.”

27. Roll up one’s sleeves

This expression means to prepare oneself for hard work or to get ready to tackle a task. It implies a willingness to put in effort and get things done.

  • For instance, before starting a difficult project, someone might say, “Time to roll up our sleeves and get to work.”
  • In a team setting, a leader might motivate their team by saying, “Let’s roll up our sleeves and show them what we’re capable of.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “Don’t worry, just roll up your sleeves and give it your best shot.”

28. Buckle down

To “buckle down” means to concentrate and apply oneself seriously to a task or goal. It implies a commitment to putting in the necessary effort and overcoming distractions or obstacles.

  • For example, before an important exam, someone might say, “I need to buckle down and study.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might advise their team to “buckle down and meet the deadline.”
  • A parent might encourage their child by saying, “It’s time to buckle down and finish your homework.”

29. Throw oneself in the deep end

This phrase means to immerse oneself in a difficult or unfamiliar situation, often without prior experience or preparation. It implies a willingness to take risks and learn through hands-on experience.

  • For instance, someone starting a new job might say, “I’m ready to throw myself in the deep end and learn as I go.”
  • In a personal development context, someone might challenge themselves by saying, “I’m going to throw myself in the deep end and try something completely out of my comfort zone.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You’ve got this! Just throw yourself in the deep end and see what happens.”

30. Take the plunge

To “take the plunge” means to make a daring or decisive move, often involving a significant risk or commitment. It implies a willingness to take action and embrace new opportunities.

  • For example, someone deciding to start their own business might say, “I’m finally ready to take the plunge and pursue my dreams.”
  • In a relationship context, someone might say, “After months of dating, we decided to take the plunge and move in together.”
  • A person contemplating a major life change might seek advice by saying, “I’m considering taking the plunge, but I’m not sure if it’s the right decision.”

31. Get on the bandwagon

This phrase means to join or support a popular trend or activity that many other people are already involved in. It can refer to anything from a social media challenge to a political movement.

  • For example, “Everyone is watching that new TV show, I guess I should get on the bandwagon too.”
  • In a discussion about a popular diet, someone might say, “I finally decided to get on the bandwagon and try the keto diet.”
  • A person might encourage others by saying, “Don’t miss out on the fun, get on the bandwagon and join us!”

32. Tune in

This phrase means to pay attention or focus on something, usually a specific event or situation. It can be used in various contexts, such as watching a TV show or listening to a speaker.

  • For instance, “Tune in to the news tonight for the latest updates on the election.”
  • A person might say, “Tune in to our live webinar tomorrow to learn more about the topic.”
  • In a conversation about a sports game, someone might ask, “Are you going to tune in and watch the match?”

33. Connect with

This phrase means to establish a relationship or bond with someone, usually on a deeper level. It can refer to forming connections with friends, colleagues, or even strangers.

  • For example, “I really connected with the main character in that book.”
  • In a discussion about networking, someone might say, “It’s important to connect with professionals in your industry.”
  • A person might express their desire by saying, “I hope to connect with like-minded individuals at the conference.”

34. Lock and load

This phrase is commonly used in a military or combat context to indicate that a weapon is loaded and ready to be used. It can also be used metaphorically to mean preparing for action or being ready for something.

  • For instance, “The soldiers locked and loaded their rifles before entering the battlefield.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging task, someone might say, “I’m ready to lock and load and tackle this project.”
  • A person might use the phrase to express their readiness by saying, “I’m locked and loaded for the weekend trip!”

35. Join the conversation

This phrase means to actively participate in a discussion or dialogue. It can be used in both online and offline contexts, such as joining a conversation on social media or contributing to a group discussion.

  • For example, “Feel free to join the conversation and share your thoughts.”
  • In a meeting, someone might encourage others by saying, “Let’s make sure everyone has a chance to join the conversation.”
  • A person might express their interest by saying, “I would love to join the conversation and hear different perspectives.”
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