Top 45 Slang For Enlighten – Meaning & Usage

Ever heard someone say they’ve been “enlightened” and wondered what they meant? Well, wonder no more! We’ve curated a list of the coolest and most current slang terms for “enlighten” that will have you feeling in the know and ready to drop some knowledge bombs in your conversations. So, get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with these trendy expressions!

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1. School

To “school” someone means to educate or inform them about something. It can also mean to give someone a lesson or to show them how something is done.

  • For example, “I schooled my friend on the history of jazz music.”
  • A teacher might say, “I’m here to school you on the importance of proper grammar.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “We’re going to school our opponents on the field.”

2. Hip

To “hip” someone to something means to inform or update them about it. It can also mean to make someone aware of the latest trends or news.

  • For instance, “I’ll hip you to the latest gossip.”
  • A friend might say, “Let me hip you to this new restaurant in town.”
  • In a conversation about current events, someone might ask, “Can you hip me to what’s happening in the world?”

3. Clue in

To “clue in” someone means to inform or enlighten them about something. It can also mean to give someone information or knowledge that they were previously unaware of.

  • For example, “I’ll clue you in on the secret recipe.”
  • A coworker might say, “Let me clue you in on the latest office gossip.”
  • In a discussion about a TV show, someone might say, “I don’t want to spoil it, but I can clue you in on what happened in the last episode.”

4. Wise up

To “wise up” means to become aware or informed about something. It can also mean to gain knowledge or understanding about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “It’s time to wise up and start saving money.”
  • A parent might say, “I hope my kids wise up and start taking their education seriously.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might say, “We need to wise up and vote for candidates who will bring about positive change.”

5. Put in the know

To “put someone in the know” means to inform or enlighten them about something. It can also mean to make someone aware of a particular situation or piece of information.

  • For example, “I’ll put you in the know about our upcoming plans.”
  • A friend might say, “Let me put you in the know about this new band I discovered.”
  • In a discussion about a secret event, someone might say, “Only a few people are in the know about the details.”

6. Fill in

To provide someone with missing information or update them on a situation. “Fill in” is often used when someone needs to be brought up to speed or given additional details.

  • For instance, if a person missed a meeting, they might ask a colleague to “fill them in” on what was discussed.
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Can you fill me in on what I missed?”
  • A friend might say, “I wasn’t there, so please fill me in on what happened at the party.”

7. Edify

To provide someone with knowledge or information in a way that helps them grow intellectually or morally. “Edify” is often used to describe the act of teaching or enlightening someone in a profound or transformative manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “It is my goal to edify my students and expand their understanding of the world.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “My purpose is to edify and inspire others to reach their full potential.”
  • A parent might say, “I try to edify my children by exposing them to different cultures and ideas.”

8. Teach

To impart knowledge or skills to someone through instruction or guidance. “Teach” is a straightforward term used to describe the act of educating or enlightening someone.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I love to teach because I enjoy seeing my students learn and grow.”
  • A mentor might say, “I feel fulfilled when I can teach others the lessons I’ve learned.”
  • A parent might say, “It’s important to teach our children about kindness and empathy.”

9. Enlighten

To provide someone with knowledge or insight that expands their understanding or awareness. “Enlighten” is a more poetic term used to describe the act of shedding light on a subject or idea.

  • For example, a philosopher might say, “The purpose of philosophy is to enlighten individuals and help them find meaning in life.”
  • A spiritual teacher might say, “My goal is to enlighten others about the nature of consciousness and inner peace.”
  • A friend might say, “I read an enlightening book that changed my perspective on the world.”

10. Inform

To provide someone with factual information or news. “Inform” is a broad term used to describe the act of sharing knowledge or updating someone on a particular topic.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “My job is to inform the public about important events and issues.”
  • A friend might say, “I wanted to inform you that the party has been rescheduled.”
  • A teacher might say, “It’s important to inform students about current events and encourage them to stay informed.”

11. Instruct

To provide knowledge or information to someone in a formal or structured manner.

  • For example, a teacher might instruct their students on how to solve a math problem.
  • A coach might instruct their team on the proper technique for a particular sport.
  • A parent might instruct their child on how to ride a bike for the first time.
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12. Educate

To provide knowledge or information to someone in order to broaden their understanding or improve their skills.

  • For instance, a documentary film can educate viewers about a specific historical event.
  • A mentor can educate their mentee on the intricacies of a particular industry.
  • A book can educate readers on a complex scientific concept.

13. Update

To provide someone with the most recent or up-to-date information on a particular topic.

  • For example, a news anchor can update viewers on the latest developments in a breaking news story.
  • A supervisor can update their team on changes to company policies or procedures.
  • A friend can update another friend on recent events in their life.

14. Break it down

To provide a detailed explanation or analysis of a complex topic or concept in a simplified or easily understandable manner.

  • For instance, a teacher might break down a difficult math problem step by step for their students.
  • A presenter might break down the process of creating a website for a non-technical audience.
  • A journalist might break down the key points of a complicated legal case for their readers.

15. Shed light on

To provide insight or clarity on a particular topic or issue.

  • For example, a researcher can shed light on the causes of a specific disease.
  • A journalist can shed light on a controversial political scandal.
  • A documentary can shed light on the experiences of marginalized communities.

16. Clue up

When you clue someone up, you are giving them the necessary information or knowledge about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “I’ll clue you up on the new project during our meeting.”
  • A teacher might say, “I need to clue my students up on the upcoming exam.”
  • In a conversation about a recent news event, someone might ask, “Can you clue me up on what happened?”

17. Let in on

When you let someone in on something, you are sharing a secret or previously unknown information with them.

  • For instance, “I’ll let you in on a little secret: I’m planning a surprise party for Sarah.”
  • A friend might say, “Let me in on the details of your new business venture.”
  • In a discussion about a hidden gem restaurant, someone might say, “I’ll let you in on the best spot in town.”

18. Open up

When you open up, you are revealing or sharing personal thoughts, feelings, or information with someone.

  • For example, “He finally opened up about his struggles with anxiety.”
  • A therapist might encourage a patient to “open up and talk about their childhood experiences.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “I really need you to open up and tell me what’s going on.”

19. Smarten up

When you smarten up, you are making an effort to improve your appearance, behavior, or performance.

  • For instance, “You should smarten up and dress more professionally for the job interview.”
  • A parent might say, “It’s time for you to smarten up and start taking your studies seriously.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s performance, someone might say, “The players need to smarten up and start making better decisions on the field.”

20. Give the lowdown

When you give someone the lowdown, you are providing them with detailed and essential information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “Can you give me the lowdown on the new employee?”
  • A tour guide might say, “Before we start the tour, let me give you the lowdown on the city’s history.”
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might ask, “Could you give me the lowdown on its features and benefits?”

21. Brief

To brief someone means to provide them with a quick and concise summary or explanation of a topic or situation.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I’ll brief you on the new project during our meeting.”
  • In a military context, a commander might brief their troops on the upcoming mission.
  • A teacher might say, “Let me brief you on the homework assignment for tonight.”

22. Wise

To wise someone up means to share knowledge or insight with them, often to help them understand a situation or make better decisions.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Let me wise you up about the new restaurant in town. It’s amazing!”
  • In a conversation about personal finance, someone might advise, “Wise up and start saving for retirement.”
  • A mentor might say, “I’m here to wise you up on the realities of the job market.”

23. Open someone’s eyes

To open someone’s eyes means to make them aware or help them understand something they may not have realized before.

  • For example, a documentary might open someone’s eyes to the effects of climate change.
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to open people’s eyes to the systemic inequalities in our society.”
  • A teacher might strive to open their students’ eyes to different perspectives and cultures.
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24. Illuminate

To illuminate means to shed light on a topic or situation, often by providing additional information or insight.

  • For instance, a journalist might strive to illuminate the truth behind a controversial event.
  • In a discussion about a complex scientific concept, someone might say, “Let me try to illuminate this for you.”
  • A speaker at a conference might aim to illuminate the audience on new technological advancements.

25. School someone

To school someone means to teach or educate them, often in a way that emphasizes one’s own superior knowledge or skill.

  • For example, a seasoned chess player might school a beginner in the game’s strategies.
  • In a debate, someone might say, “I’m about to school you on the flaws in your argument.”
  • A mentor might school their protege on the finer points of their craft.

26. Edutain

This term combines the words “educate” and “entertain” to describe a method of teaching or sharing information in an engaging and enjoyable way.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I try to edutain my students by incorporating games and interactive activities into my lessons.”
  • A parent might say, “I love finding edutaining books and videos to help my child learn.”
  • A presenter at a conference might mention, “My goal is to edutain the audience with a mix of informative content and humor.”

27. Hip someone to

To “hip someone to” something means to inform or introduce them to a particular topic, idea, or piece of information.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Let me hip you to the latest music trends.”
  • A coworker might ask, “Can you hip me to the new company policies?”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “I’m here to hip you to the wonders of science.”

28. Bring up to speed

To “bring someone up to speed” means to update or inform them about the latest information or developments on a particular topic.

  • For example, a team leader might say, “Let’s have a meeting to bring everyone up to speed on the project.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you bring me up to speed on what happened while I was away?”
  • A manager might tell an employee, “I need to bring you up to speed on the changes in our department.”

29. Show the ropes

To “show someone the ropes” means to teach or guide them in learning the basics or essentials of a task, job, or activity.

  • For instance, a mentor might say, “I’ll show you the ropes of this new software.”
  • A coach might tell a player, “I’ll show you the ropes of the game, so you can improve.”
  • A supervisor might say, “I’ll show you the ropes of this job, so you can hit the ground running.”

30. Break the news

To “break the news” means to inform someone of important or significant information, often news that may be surprising, unexpected, or challenging.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I’m sorry, but I have to break the news to you that the test results came back positive.”
  • A friend might say, “I have to break the news to you that your favorite band broke up.”
  • A journalist might report, “I’m here to break the news about the latest political scandal.”

31. Give the scoop

This phrase means to give someone the inside information or provide them with the latest news or details about a particular topic.

  • For example, “Can you give me the scoop on what happened at the party last night?”
  • In a gossip-filled conversation, someone might say, “I’ll give you the scoop on the latest celebrity scandal.”
  • A journalist might ask a source, “Can you give me the scoop on the upcoming product launch?”

32. Familiarize

To familiarize someone means to make them familiar or knowledgeable about a particular subject or topic.

  • For instance, a tour guide might say, “Let me familiarize you with the history of this monument.”
  • In a training session, a teacher might explain, “Our goal is to familiarize you with the new software.”
  • A manager might ask a new employee, “Have you been familiarized with our company policies?”

33. Lighten up

This phrase is used to encourage someone to relax, become less serious, or take things less seriously.

  • For example, if someone is being overly serious, someone might say, “Lighten up! It’s just a joke.”
  • In a tense situation, a friend might try to lighten the mood by saying, “Come on, let’s all lighten up and have some fun.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “You need to lighten up and not stress so much about grades.”

34. Show the way

This phrase means to guide or lead someone in the right direction, either physically or metaphorically.

  • For instance, if someone is lost, they might ask, “Can you show me the way to the nearest train station?”
  • In a leadership role, someone might say, “It’s my job to show the way and set an example for my team.”
  • A mentor might tell their mentee, “I’m here to show you the way and help you navigate your career.”

35. Enlighten someone

To enlighten someone means to provide them with knowledge, insight, or understanding about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “My goal is to enlighten my students about the importance of environmental conservation.”
  • In a philosophical discussion, someone might argue, “The purpose of education is to enlighten individuals and expand their minds.”
  • A friend might share an interesting article and say, “I thought this would enlighten you about the latest scientific discoveries.”

36. Make someone aware

This phrase means to provide information or knowledge to someone, making them aware of something.

  • For example, “I made him aware of the new company policy.”
  • In a conversation about current events, someone might say, “I want to make you aware of the recent developments.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “I need to make you aware of the upcoming assignment deadline.”

37. School someone on

This slang phrase means to educate or teach someone about a particular subject or topic.

  • For instance, “He schooled me on the history of jazz.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Can you school me on how to use this new app?”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I’m going to school you on how to do laundry before you go to college.”

38. Bring someone into the loop

This phrase means to involve someone in a conversation or keep them informed about a particular matter.

  • For example, “I’ll bring you into the loop regarding the project updates.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s bring everyone into the loop on the new marketing strategy.”
  • A friend might say to another, “I’ll bring you into the loop about the surprise party we’re planning.”

39. Enlighten someone’s perspective

This phrase means to provide new information or insights that expand someone’s knowledge or alter their perspective.

  • For instance, “The documentary enlightened my perspective on climate change.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “I hope to enlighten your perspective on this topic.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Our goal is to enlighten your perspective on different cultures and traditions.”

40. Light bulb moment

This slang phrase refers to a moment when someone suddenly understands or comprehends something.

  • For example, “When she explained the concept, I had a light bulb moment.”
  • In a conversation about problem-solving, someone might say, “I had a light bulb moment and found a solution.”
  • A student might say to their classmate, “I had a light bulb moment while studying for the math test.”

41. Woke

Being “woke” means being aware and knowledgeable about social and political issues, especially those related to discrimination and inequality. It is often used to describe someone who has gained a deeper understanding of these issues and actively works towards change.

  • For example, “She became woke after attending a protest and learning more about systemic racism.”
  • A person might say, “I used to be ignorant, but now I’m woke and fighting for justice.”
  • Another might post, “Just read an eye-opening book that really woke me up to the realities of privilege and oppression.”

42. Clued in

When someone is “clued in,” it means they are informed and up-to-date on a particular topic or situation. This can refer to being knowledgeable about current events, trends, or insider information.

  • For instance, “He’s always clued in on the latest tech gadgets and trends.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not clued in on the details of the project, can you fill me in?”
  • Another might comment, “I feel so out of the loop, I need to get clued in on what’s been happening.”

43. Hip to

Being “hip to” something means being familiar with and understanding it. It can refer to being knowledgeable about a particular topic, trend, or cultural reference.

  • For example, “She’s really hip to all the latest fashion trends.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not hip to that slang, can you explain what it means?”
  • Another might comment, “I’m not really hip to the whole social media scene, I prefer to stay offline.”

44. Brainwave

A “brainwave” is a sudden realization or insight that provides a solution or understanding. It is often used to describe a moment of clarity or a brilliant idea.

  • For instance, “I had a brainwave and figured out how to solve the problem.”
  • A person might say, “I just had a brainwave about how to improve our marketing strategy.”
  • Another might comment, “Sometimes, the best ideas come to me in the shower. It’s like a brainwave hits me.”

45. Get the picture

To “get the picture” means to understand the situation or concept at hand. It is often used when someone wants to ensure that others have a clear understanding of what is being discussed.

  • For example, “I explained the rules again to make sure everyone gets the picture.”
  • A person might say, “I need to see the evidence to get the full picture of what happened.”
  • Another might comment, “I’ve been studying this topic for years, so I definitely get the picture.”