Top 54 Slang For Equality – Meaning & Usage

In a world where conversations about equality are more important than ever, staying up-to-date with the latest slang for equality can help amplify important messages and foster inclusivity. Whether you’re a social justice warrior or simply curious about the language of equality, our team has curated a list that will empower you to communicate effectively and advocate for a fairer society. Get ready to broaden your vocabulary and join the conversation on equality like never before!

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1. Level playing field

This phrase refers to a situation where everyone has an equal chance to succeed or compete. It implies that there are no unfair advantages or disadvantages.

  • For example, in a job interview, a candidate might say, “I believe in creating a level playing field for all applicants.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might argue, “To ensure fairness, we need to establish a level playing field for all teams.”
  • A person advocating for gender equality might state, “We need to work towards creating a level playing field in the workplace.”

2. Fair shake

This phrase means giving someone a fair and unbiased opportunity or chance. It implies that everyone should be treated equally and without favoritism.

  • For instance, if someone feels they were not given a fair shake in a competition, they might say, “I didn’t get a fair shake in the judging process.”
  • In a discussion about equal rights, someone might argue, “Every individual deserves a fair shake, regardless of their background.”
  • A person advocating for equal opportunities might state, “We need to ensure everyone gets a fair shake in education and employment.”

3. Same wavelength

This phrase means to be thinking or feeling the same way as someone else. It implies that two or more people have a shared understanding or perspective.

  • For example, if two friends have the same idea at the same time, one might say, “Great minds think alike. We’re on the same wavelength.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “I think we’re all on the same wavelength here. We want the same outcome.”
  • A person discussing teamwork might state, “To work effectively together, we need to be on the same wavelength and understand each other’s goals.”

4. Equal footing

This phrase means to be on an equal level or in a fair and balanced position. It implies that no one has an advantage or disadvantage over others.

  • For instance, in a negotiation, someone might say, “Let’s start on equal footing and work towards a mutually beneficial agreement.”
  • In a discussion about competition, someone might argue, “To ensure fairness, all participants should start on equal footing.”
  • A person advocating for equal rights might state, “We need to strive for a society where everyone is on equal footing, regardless of their background.”

5. Balanced scales

This phrase refers to the idea of fairness and impartiality. It implies that decisions or judgments should be made without bias or favoritism.

  • For example, in a court of law, someone might say, “Justice requires balanced scales, where all evidence is considered.”
  • In a discussion about fairness, someone might argue, “We need to ensure that the scales are balanced for everyone, regardless of their social status.”
  • A person advocating for equal opportunities might state, “We need to create a system where the scales are balanced and everyone has a fair chance to succeed.”

6. Even keel

This phrase is used to describe a situation or person that is calm, stable, and balanced. It refers to maintaining an equal level and avoiding extreme fluctuations or emotions.

  • For example, “Even though she was going through a tough time, she managed to stay on an even keel.”
  • In a discussion about managing stress, someone might say, “Finding ways to stay on an even keel is important for overall well-being.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Stay focused and keep your emotions on an even keel during the game.”

7. On par

This phrase is used to indicate that something or someone is at the same level or standard as another. It suggests equality or similarity in performance or quality.

  • For instance, “Her skills are on par with those of professional athletes.”
  • In a conversation about academic achievements, someone might say, “His grades are consistently on par with the top students in the class.”
  • A reviewer might write, “The movie’s special effects are on par with the latest blockbusters.”

8. Equitable

This term is used to describe a situation or system that is characterized by fairness, justice, and equal treatment for all parties involved.

  • For example, “We need to create an equitable society where everyone has access to the same opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about income distribution, someone might argue, “A more equitable tax system would help reduce wealth inequality.”
  • A policy advocate might say, “We need to ensure that our laws are equitable and do not discriminate against any group.”

9. Parity

This word refers to a state of equality or equivalence between different entities, often in terms of value, status, or power.

  • For instance, “Gender parity in the workplace means equal representation and opportunities for men and women.”
  • In a conversation about sports, someone might say, “The teams are evenly matched, resulting in a parity of skills.”
  • A business analyst might explain, “Price parity refers to the equal pricing of a product across different markets.”

10. Just deserts

This phrase is used to refer to the idea that someone receives what they deserve, whether it is punishment for wrongdoing or reward for good behavior.

  • For example, “After all the hard work she put in, winning the competition was her just deserts.”
  • In a discussion about justice, someone might argue, “Criminals should receive their just deserts to maintain societal order.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “If you study hard, good grades will be your just deserts.”

11. Even odds

This phrase refers to a situation where both outcomes have an equal probability of occurring. It is often used in gambling or sports betting to describe a situation where the chances of winning or losing are equal.

  • For example, a person might say, “I think both teams have even odds of winning the game.”
  • In a discussion about a competition, someone might comment, “The two competitors are evenly matched, so it’s really even odds.”
  • A person discussing a decision might say, “I weighed the pros and cons, and it seemed like there were even odds for either choice.”

12. Common ground

This term refers to a point of agreement or understanding between different individuals or groups. It highlights the areas where people can come together despite their differences.

  • For instance, in a political debate, someone might say, “Let’s find common ground on this issue and work towards a solution.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, a person might say, “Finding common ground is important for a healthy partnership.”
  • A person discussing teamwork might comment, “Successful collaboration requires finding common ground among team members.”

13. Equanimity

This word describes a state of being calm and composed, especially in difficult or stressful situations. It emphasizes the ability to maintain emotional balance and stability.

  • For example, a meditation practitioner might seek equanimity in order to stay centered and focused.
  • In a discussion about handling criticism, someone might say, “Maintaining equanimity can help us respond constructively instead of reacting defensively.”
  • A person discussing leadership might comment, “Leaders with equanimity are often able to make better decisions under pressure.”

14. Unity in diversity

This phrase highlights the importance of embracing diversity and finding unity despite individual differences. It emphasizes the idea that different perspectives, backgrounds, and experiences can come together to create a stronger and more inclusive society.

  • For instance, in a multicultural society, someone might say, “We celebrate unity in diversity, recognizing the value of different cultures.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, a person might comment, “A diverse team can bring fresh ideas and perspectives, leading to innovation and success.”
  • A person discussing social justice might argue, “Unity in diversity is essential for creating a fair and inclusive society.”

15. Inclusive

This term describes an environment or attitude that embraces and values diversity. It emphasizes the importance of including and respecting all individuals, regardless of their background, identity, or abilities.

  • For example, a company might strive to be inclusive by implementing policies that support diversity and equity.
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “An inclusive classroom ensures that all students have equal opportunities to learn and thrive.”
  • A person discussing community engagement might comment, “An inclusive community actively seeks input and involvement from all its members.”

16. Even-handed

This term refers to treating everyone equally and without bias. It means being just and fair in all situations.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I strive to be even-handed when making decisions about promotions.”
  • In a discussion about justice, someone might argue, “An even-handed approach is crucial to ensuring a fair legal system.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students to be even-handed when resolving conflicts, saying, “Listen to both sides and consider all perspectives before making a judgment.”

17. Harmony

Harmony refers to a state of peaceful coexistence and agreement among individuals or groups. It means working together and finding common ground.

  • For instance, a choir might strive for harmony in their performance, blending their voices to create a beautiful sound.
  • In a team setting, someone might say, “Let’s work in harmony to achieve our goals.”
  • A community leader might emphasize the importance of harmony among different cultural groups, saying, “We must celebrate our diversity and strive for harmony.”

18. Solidarity

Solidarity refers to the unity and support among individuals or groups, especially in the face of adversity or injustice. It means standing together and fighting for a common cause.

  • For example, during a protest, people might chant, “Solidarity forever!”
  • In a discussion about workers’ rights, someone might say, “Workers need to show solidarity and demand fair treatment.”
  • A friend might express solidarity with someone going through a difficult time by saying, “I’m here for you. We’re in this together.”

19. Mutual respect

Mutual respect means having a positive regard for others and considering their feelings, opinions, and boundaries. It involves treating others with dignity and expecting the same in return.

  • For instance, in a healthy relationship, there is mutual respect between partners.
  • In a workplace, a manager might emphasize the importance of mutual respect among colleagues, saying, “We must create an environment where everyone feels valued.”
  • A teacher might teach students about mutual respect, saying, “Treat others the way you want to be treated.”

20. Team player

A team player is someone who works well with others, contributes to the group’s success, and puts the team’s goals before their own. It means being cooperative and supportive.

  • For example, in a job interview, someone might say, “I’m a team player who enjoys collaborating with others.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might praise a player for being a team player, saying, “They always put the team’s success first.”
  • A colleague might appreciate a team player by saying, “They’re always willing to help out and go the extra mile.”

21. Allies

Allies are individuals or groups who actively support and advocate for marginalized communities. They use their privilege and influence to amplify the voices and rights of others.

  • For example, “Thank you to all the allies who showed up at the protest to support LGBTQ+ rights.”
  • A person might say, “I’m an ally to the Black Lives Matter movement because I believe in racial equality.”
  • In a discussion about feminism, someone might ask, “How can men be better allies to women in the fight for gender equality?”

22. Coexist

The term “coexist” emphasizes the idea of different groups or individuals peacefully living together despite their differences in culture, religion, or beliefs.

  • For instance, you might see a bumper sticker with symbols from different religions spelling out the word “coexist.”
  • In a conversation about religious tolerance, someone might say, “We need to learn to coexist and respect each other’s beliefs.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Let’s embrace diversity and strive to coexist harmoniously.”

23. Bridge the gap

To “bridge the gap” means to reduce or eliminate the differences between two groups or individuals, particularly in terms of understanding, communication, or access to opportunities.

  • For example, a company might implement programs to bridge the gender pay gap and promote equality in the workplace.
  • In a discussion about racial justice, someone might say, “We need to bridge the gap between different communities and work towards true equality.”
  • A person advocating for accessible education might argue, “Investing in quality education is crucial to bridge the gap between privileged and underprivileged students.”

24. One for all, all for one

This phrase emphasizes the importance of unity and collective action for the benefit of all. It signifies the belief that everyone should work together and support each other in pursuing equality and justice.

  • For instance, a group of activists might chant, “One for all, all for one!” during a protest.
  • In a conversation about social movements, someone might say, “We need to stand united and remember the principle of ‘one for all, all for one’.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Let’s support each other and remember that we’re stronger together. One for all, all for one!”

25. Same-same

The term “same-same” is used to express equality or similarity between two or more things or individuals.

  • For example, a person might say, “We’re all the same-same deep down, regardless of our differences.”
  • In a discussion about LGBTQ+ rights, someone might argue, “Love is love. It’s all same-same.”
  • A person might use the phrase to express support for gender equality, saying, “Men and women should be treated the same-same in every aspect of life.”

26. Even-steven

This phrase is used to describe a situation where everything is fair and balanced. It implies that both parties involved receive an equal share or treatment.

  • For example, if two friends split the bill for dinner, one might say, “Let’s go even-steven and each pay half.”
  • In a game, a player might declare, “I won’t stop until the score is even-steven.”
  • When dividing up tasks, someone might say, “Let’s make sure everyone has an even-steven workload.”

27. Square deal

A “square deal” refers to a fair and honest agreement or transaction. It implies that both parties involved are treated justly and receive what they deserve.

  • For instance, in a negotiation, someone might say, “I’m looking for a square deal where both sides benefit.”
  • In a business deal, a person might insist, “I won’t settle for anything less than a square deal.”
  • When discussing politics, someone might argue, “We need a leader who will ensure a square deal for all citizens.”

28. Fair share

This phrase is used to describe an equal or just portion of something. It implies that each person involved receives their appropriate or fair share.

  • For example, when dividing a pizza, someone might say, “Make sure everyone gets a fair share.”
  • In a discussion about wealth distribution, a person might argue, “Everyone should pay their fair share of taxes.”
  • When allocating resources, someone might say, “We need to ensure that everyone has a fair share.”

29. Just desserts

This phrase is used to describe the idea that someone receives the appropriate or deserved consequences for their actions. It implies that justice is served.

  • For instance, if someone is caught stealing, a person might say, “They got their just desserts.”
  • In a discussion about karma, someone might say, “What goes around comes around, and people eventually get their just desserts.”
  • When discussing a criminal trial, someone might argue, “The accused should receive their just desserts if found guilty.”

30. Playing by the same rules

This phrase is used to describe a situation where everyone follows the same set of rules or guidelines. It implies that there is equal treatment and no unfair advantages.

  • For example, in a sports competition, a coach might emphasize, “We need to make sure we’re all playing by the same rules.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “It’s important that both sides are playing by the same rules to ensure a fair discussion.”
  • When discussing fairness in society, someone might say, “We need a system where everyone is playing by the same rules.”

31. Equal pay for equal work

This phrase emphasizes the importance of providing the same salary or wages to individuals who perform the same job or work of equal value. It advocates for eliminating gender-based pay disparities and promoting fairness in the workplace.

  • For example, a feminist activist might say, “We need to fight for equal pay for equal work to close the gender wage gap.”
  • A news article might highlight a company that has implemented “equal pay for equal work” policies to ensure fairness and equality among its employees.
  • During a panel discussion on gender equality, a speaker might argue, “Equal pay for equal work is not just a women’s issue, it’s a human rights issue.”

32. Equal representation

This phrase refers to the idea that all individuals or groups should be adequately represented in various aspects of society, such as politics, media, and decision-making processes. It emphasizes the importance of diversity, inclusivity, and equal opportunities for all.

  • For instance, a social justice advocate might say, “We need to strive for equal representation of marginalized communities in positions of power.”
  • A news article might discuss the lack of equal representation of women in corporate boardrooms and the need for change.
  • During a debate on political representation, a participant might argue, “Equal representation ensures that diverse voices are heard and considered in policy-making.”

33. Equal partnership

This phrase describes a relationship or collaboration where all parties have equal rights, responsibilities, and decision-making power. It emphasizes the importance of mutual respect, shared goals, and fair treatment in both personal and professional partnerships.

  • For example, a relationship coach might advise couples to strive for an equal partnership based on open communication and shared responsibilities.
  • A business article might discuss the benefits of fostering an equal partnership between employees and management for increased productivity and job satisfaction.
  • During a discussion on gender roles, a participant might argue, “An equal partnership allows both partners to thrive and contribute their unique strengths.”

34. Equal treatment under the law

This phrase refers to the principle that all individuals should be treated equally and without discrimination by the legal system. It emphasizes the need for justice to be blind to factors such as race, gender, socioeconomic status, or any other characteristic.

  • For instance, a civil rights activist might say, “We must fight for equal treatment under the law to ensure justice for all.”
  • A news article might highlight a case where unequal treatment under the law has led to injustice and the need for legal reforms.
  • During a panel discussion on criminal justice reform, a speaker might argue, “Equal treatment under the law is a fundamental right that should be upheld for every citizen.”

35. Equal access

This phrase refers to the principle that all individuals should have equal opportunities and access to resources, services, and opportunities. It emphasizes the importance of removing barriers and ensuring inclusivity for everyone, regardless of their background or circumstances.

  • For example, an education advocate might say, “Equal access to quality education is essential for creating a fair and just society.”
  • A news article might discuss the challenges faced by individuals with disabilities in accessing public spaces and the need for improved accessibility.
  • During a discussion on healthcare, a participant might argue, “Equal access to healthcare is a basic human right that should be guaranteed for all.”

36. Same difference

This phrase is used to convey that two things or situations are essentially the same or have no significant distinction. It is often used to dismiss minor differences or to emphasize that the outcome is ultimately the same.

  • For example, if someone says, “I prefer vanilla ice cream, but chocolate is fine too,” another person might respond, “Same difference.”
  • In a debate about two similar products, one might argue, “They’re both good options, so it’s really the same difference.”
  • Someone might say, “I failed the test by one point, but a failing grade is a failing grade. Same difference.”

37. Even the odds

This phrase means to make a situation fair or equal by giving someone or something an advantage or opportunity to compete. It is often used when one side is perceived to have an advantage and needs to be balanced out.

  • For instance, if a team is playing against a much stronger opponent, a coach might say, “We need to even the odds by focusing on our strategy.”
  • In a negotiation, one party might propose, “Let’s even the odds by offering some concessions.”
  • Someone might encourage a friend by saying, “You can do it! Even the odds and show them what you’re capable of.”

38. Hand in hand

This phrase is used to describe two things or concepts that are closely connected or related to each other. It suggests that the two things go together or are inseparable.

  • For example, one might say, “Education and success go hand in hand.”
  • In a discussion about technology and innovation, someone might argue, “Advancements in science and technology go hand in hand.”
  • A person might describe a strong friendship by saying, “Trust and loyalty go hand in hand.”

39. Two peas in a pod

This phrase is used to describe two people who are very similar or closely related in terms of their interests, personalities, or behaviors. It implies that the two individuals are so alike that they could be considered as almost identical.

  • For instance, if two friends always dress alike and have the same tastes, someone might say, “They’re like two peas in a pod.”
  • In a discussion about siblings, one might say, “My brother and I are two peas in a pod.”
  • A person might describe a couple who always agree on everything by saying, “They’re like two peas in a pod.”

40. Cut from the same cloth

This phrase is used to describe two or more people who are very similar in terms of their characteristics, values, or beliefs. It suggests that the individuals have a lot in common and share similar traits or qualities.

  • For example, if two friends have the same sense of humor and always make the same jokes, someone might say, “They’re cut from the same cloth.”
  • In a discussion about political ideologies, one might argue, “Conservatives and libertarians are often cut from the same cloth.”
  • A person might describe a group of artists who have similar styles by saying, “They’re all cut from the same cloth.”

41. In the same boat

This phrase is used to describe a group of people who are facing a similar challenge or experiencing the same circumstances.

  • For example, “We’re all in the same boat when it comes to dealing with this pandemic.”
  • In a discussion about financial struggles, someone might say, “We’re in the same boat, trying to make ends meet.”
  • A person expressing empathy might say, “I understand how you feel, we’re all in the same boat here.”

42. Birds of a feather

This phrase is used to describe a group of people who share common traits, interests, or opinions.

  • For instance, “They say birds of a feather flock together, and that’s certainly true for us.”
  • In a conversation about forming friendships, someone might say, “I tend to gravitate towards people who are birds of a feather.”
  • A person discussing team dynamics might say, “It’s important to have birds of a feather on a project to ensure smooth collaboration.”

43. All for one and one for all

This phrase emphasizes the importance of unity and collective support, with everyone working towards a common goal.

  • For example, “In this organization, it’s all for one and one for all.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “We need to adopt an ‘all for one and one for all’ mentality to succeed.”
  • A person advocating for equality might say, “We should strive for a society where it’s truly all for one and one for all.”

44. Shoulder to shoulder

This phrase signifies standing side by side with others, offering support and solidarity.

  • For instance, “We will face this challenge shoulder to shoulder.”
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might say, “We need to work shoulder to shoulder to achieve our goals.”
  • A person expressing unity might say, “Let’s stand shoulder to shoulder and fight for what’s right.”

45. In cahoots

This phrase is used to describe people who are colluding or working together, often in a secretive or dishonest manner.

  • For example, “I suspect they’re in cahoots, planning something behind our backs.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “They’re all in cahoots, trying to control the world.”
  • A person expressing suspicion might say, “I think they’re in cahoots with the opposing team, sharing our strategies.”

46. In lockstep

This phrase refers to a situation where two or more people or things are moving or acting together in a synchronized manner. It implies that they are in perfect harmony or alignment.

  • For example, “The team worked in lockstep to complete the project ahead of schedule.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The two candidates are in lockstep on this issue.”
  • A journalist might write, “The government and the opposition are in lockstep in their support for the new legislation.”

47. Cut and dried

This term is used to describe a situation or issue that is straightforward, predictable, or already determined without any room for debate or discussion.

  • For instance, “The outcome of the trial was cut and dried; the evidence against the defendant was overwhelming.”
  • In a business context, one might say, “The decision to close the branch was cut and dried; the financial figures clearly showed it was not profitable.”
  • A teacher might explain, “The grading criteria for the assignment are cut and dried; it’s based solely on correct answers.”

48. In the same ballpark

This phrase is used to indicate that two or more things or ideas are similar or comparable in terms of quantity, quality, or value, although they may not be exactly the same.

  • For example, “The cost of the two cars is not identical, but they are in the same ballpark.”
  • In a sports context, one might say, “Their performance last season was not outstanding, but it was in the same ballpark as the other teams.”
  • A financial advisor might explain, “The estimated value of the property is not precise yet, but it’s in the same ballpark as similar properties in the area.”

49. Dead heat

This term is often used in sports or other competitive contexts to describe a situation where two or more participants or teams finish a race or game at exactly the same time or with very little difference in their performance.

  • For instance, “The two runners crossed the finish line in a dead heat; it was impossible to determine the winner.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The election resulted in a dead heat, with an equal number of votes for each candidate.”
  • A commentator might describe a close basketball game as a “dead heat” when both teams have the same score at the end of regulation time.
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50. Six of one, half a dozen of the other

This phrase is used to express the idea that two alternatives or possibilities are equivalent or have the same outcome, making it irrelevant which one is chosen.

  • For example, “Whether we take the highway or the back roads, it will take the same amount of time. It’s six of one, half a dozen of the other.”
  • In a food context, one might say, “Should I order the pizza or the burger? Well, they’re both greasy and unhealthy, so it’s six of one, half a dozen of the other.”
  • A friend might ask, “Should we watch a movie or go for a walk? Either way, it’s six of one, half a dozen of the other.”

51. In the same vein

This phrase is used to indicate that something is similar or comparable to something else.

  • For example, “I agree with what you said, and I would like to add something in the same vein.”
  • In a discussion about different types of music, someone might say, “Jazz and blues are in the same vein.”
  • Another example would be, “The two movies are in the same vein, with similar themes and storytelling techniques.”

52. In the same breath

This phrase is used to suggest that two things are mentioned or done together, often in a contradictory or incongruous manner.

  • For instance, “He criticized her work, but in the same breath, he praised her dedication.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might say, “Politicians often promise one thing and do the opposite in the same breath.”
  • Another example would be, “She told me she loved me and in the same breath, asked for a divorce.”

53. In the same light

This phrase is used to indicate that something is being considered or viewed from a similar perspective.

  • For example, “When comparing the two candidates, we should look at their policies in the same light.”
  • In a debate about different art styles, someone might say, “Impressionism and post-impressionism can be seen in the same light.”
  • Another example would be, “When discussing the impact of technology on society, we should examine both the benefits and drawbacks in the same light.”

54. In the same key

This phrase is used to suggest that two or more people or things are in agreement or harmony with each other.

  • For instance, “We’re all working towards the same goal and singing in the same key.”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “For a project to be successful, everyone needs to be playing in the same key.”
  • Another example would be, “In a healthy relationship, both partners need to be in the same key, supporting and understanding each other.”