Top 27 Slang For Expense – Meaning & Usage

Budget busters, money pits, cash guzzlers – we’ve all had those expenses that seem to drain our wallets faster than we can say “ouch”. But fear not, because we’ve got your back! Our team has put together a list of the trendiest and most relatable slang for expense to help you navigate the world of finance with a touch of humor. So buckle up and get ready to laugh (or maybe cry) at these all too familiar terms that perfectly sum up the cost of living in style!

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1. Dough

This slang term refers to money or cash. It is often used to describe a large sum of money.

  • For example, “I need to save up some dough before I can go on vacation.”
  • A person might say, “I just made some extra dough from my side gig.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you lend me some dough until payday?”

2. Cash out

To “cash out” means to withdraw money from a bank account or to convert an investment into cash.

  • For instance, “I’m going to cash out my savings to buy a new car.”
  • A person might say, “I cashed out my retirement account early to pay off my debts.”
  • Another might comment, “I cashed out my winnings from the casino and treated myself to a shopping spree.”

3. Splurge

To “splurge” means to spend money on something extravagant or luxurious, often as a treat or reward.

  • For example, “I decided to splurge on a fancy dinner for my birthday.”
  • A person might say, “I splurged on a designer handbag that I’ve been eyeing for months.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m going to splurge on a spa day to relax and pamper myself.”

4. Blow money

To “blow money” means to spend money quickly and without much thought or consideration.

  • For instance, “I always blow my money on impulse purchases.”
  • A person might say, “I blew all my money at the casino last night.”
  • Another might comment, “I can’t believe I blew all my money on that concert ticket.”

5. Shell out

To “shell out” means to pay a significant amount of money, often reluctantly or unwillingly.

  • For example, “I had to shell out a lot of money for car repairs.”
  • A person might say, “I had to shell out a fortune for my child’s college tuition.”
  • Another might comment, “I’m not willing to shell out that much money for a concert ticket.”

6. Fork out

This slang phrase means to spend or give out a significant amount of money, often reluctantly or begrudgingly.

  • For example, “I had to fork out $100 for a concert ticket.”
  • Someone might complain, “Every time I go to the mechanic, I have to fork out a fortune.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you willing to fork out the cash for the new iPhone?”

7. Burn a hole in one’s pocket

This phrase is used to describe money that is spent as soon as it is received, often on unnecessary or frivolous purchases.

  • For instance, “I just got my paycheck, but it’s already burning a hole in my pocket.”
  • Someone might admit, “I can’t hold onto money for long. It always burns a hole in my pocket.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Don’t spend all your birthday money at once. It’ll just burn a hole in your pocket.”

8. Drop some coin

This slang phrase means to spend money, usually in a significant amount.

  • For example, “I dropped some serious coin on that new gaming console.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m willing to drop some coin on a nice vacation.”
  • A friend might ask, “How much did you drop on those new shoes?”

9. Pay through the nose

This phrase means to pay an excessive or exorbitant amount of money for something.

  • For instance, “I had to pay through the nose for those concert tickets.”
  • Someone might complain, “Every time I go to the mechanic, I end up paying through the nose.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you really have to pay through the nose for that designer handbag?”

10. Break the bank

This phrase means to spend a significant or excessive amount of money, often beyond one’s means.

  • For example, “I can’t afford that vacation. It would break the bank.”
  • Someone might caution, “Be careful not to break the bank on unnecessary purchases.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did buying that new car break the bank?”

11. Bleed money

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone is spending money excessively or continuously, often to the point of financial strain. It implies that money is being lost or wasted.

  • For example, “My new car is bleeding me money with all the repairs it needs.”
  • A person discussing their extravagant vacation might say, “I’m bleeding money on this trip, but it’s worth it.”
  • Someone complaining about their expensive hobbies might say, “Golfing every weekend is bleeding me money.”

12. Burn a hole in the pocket

This phrase is used to describe the feeling of wanting to spend money immediately or impulsively. It suggests that the person has an irresistible desire to spend money and can’t resist the urge.

  • For instance, “When I walk into a bookstore, all those books burn a hole in my pocket.”
  • A person with a shopping addiction might say, “I can’t help it, every sale burns a hole in my pocket.”
  • Someone talking about their love for gadgets might say, “New tech releases always burn a hole in my pocket.”

13. Fork over

This phrase is used to describe the act of paying or giving money, often in a reluctant or resentful manner. It implies that the person is parting with their money, sometimes unwillingly.

  • For example, “I had to fork over $200 for a parking ticket.”
  • A person talking about a fine might say, “The cop pulled me over and I had to fork over $500.”
  • Someone discussing a loan might say, “I had to fork over $1000 to my friend to cover my portion of the rent.”

14. Cough up

This phrase is used to describe the act of paying a debt or expense, often with some reluctance or difficulty. It implies that the person is reluctantly giving up their money.

  • For instance, “I had to cough up $50 to cover my share of the dinner bill.”
  • A person discussing an unexpected expense might say, “I had to cough up $100 to fix my car’s flat tire.”
  • Someone talking about paying a fine might say, “I had to cough up $200 for speeding.”

15. Lay out

This phrase is used to describe the act of spending money upfront, often on a large or significant purchase. It implies that the person is making a substantial financial commitment.

  • For example, “I had to lay out $1000 for a new laptop.”
  • A person discussing a home renovation might say, “We had to lay out a lot of money for the kitchen remodel.”
  • Someone talking about investing in their business might say, “I had to lay out a significant amount of money to purchase new equipment.”

16. Dish out

To spend or give out money, often in a generous or casual manner. This phrase suggests that the expense is being made willingly or without hesitation.

  • For example, “I had to dish out $50 for concert tickets.”
  • A person might say, “I’m willing to dish out some cash for a good meal.”
  • In a discussion about shopping, someone might comment, “I’m always dishing out money on clothes.”

17. Ante up

To contribute money or pay one’s share of an expense. This phrase is often used in a gambling context, where players have to contribute money to the pot before a hand is dealt.

  • For instance, “Everyone needs to ante up $10 to play in this poker game.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll ante up if you’re willing to join in.”
  • In a discussion about splitting the bill, someone might say, “Let’s all ante up so we can pay the check.”

18. Pay up

To pay the full amount owed, often used in a demanding or urgent tone. This phrase implies that the person being addressed has been slow or reluctant to fulfill their financial obligation.

  • For example, “You borrowed money from me, now it’s time to pay up.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been waiting for you to pay up for weeks.”
  • In a discussion about collecting debts, someone might comment, “Some people will do anything to avoid paying up.”

19. Cover the costs

To pay for all the expenses or costs associated with something. This phrase suggests taking responsibility for the full financial burden.

  • For instance, “Don’t worry, I’ll cover the costs of the dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll cover the costs if you cover the tip.”
  • In a discussion about planning a trip, someone might comment, “We need to figure out how to cover the costs of transportation and accommodations.”

20. Invest in

To spend money on something with the expectation of achieving a return or benefit in the future. This phrase implies a financial commitment in the hopes of gaining something valuable or profitable.

  • For example, “I’m going to invest in a new computer for my business.”
  • A person might say, “It’s important to invest in your education.”
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might comment, “I’m looking to invest in stocks for long-term growth.”

This phrase means to cover or pay for all the expenses in a particular situation or event.

  • For example, “John offered to foot the expenses for our vacation.”
  • In a group outing, someone might say, “Let’s split the bill, or one person can foot the expenses and the rest can pay them back.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I’ll foot the expenses for your college education.”

22. Burn a hole in your pocket

This phrase is used to describe the act of spending money quickly or recklessly, often on unnecessary or extravagant things.

  • For instance, “Going shopping always burns a hole in my pocket.”
  • Someone might say, “I have to be careful with my paycheck, or it will burn a hole in my pocket.”
  • A friend might jokingly comment, “Your love for designer clothes is burning a hole in your pocket.”

23. Deplete the funds

This phrase means to exhaust or use up all the available funds or money.

  • For example, “The unexpected medical expenses depleted our funds.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to be cautious with our spending to avoid depleting the funds.”
  • A financial advisor might advise, “Make a budget and stick to it to avoid depleting your funds.”

24. Drain the wallet

This phrase means to empty or exhaust one’s wallet or money.

  • For instance, “Eating out every day can drain your wallet.”
  • Someone might say, “Buying expensive gadgets constantly drains my wallet.”
  • A friend might warn, “Be careful with online shopping; it can drain your wallet before you know it.”

25. Empty the bank account

This phrase means to withdraw or use up all the money in a bank account.

  • For example, “I had to empty my bank account to pay for the emergency car repairs.”
  • A person might say, “I’m saving up for a trip, so I can’t empty my bank account right now.”
  • A financial advisor might caution, “Avoid emptying your bank account unless it’s absolutely necessary.”

26. Go on a shopping spree

This phrase refers to a period of excessive and indulgent shopping, often involving multiple purchases at once. It implies spending a significant amount of money without much restraint.

  • For example, “After receiving their tax refund, they decided to go on a shopping spree and bought new clothes, electronics, and accessories.”
  • A friend might say, “I just got my bonus, let’s go on a shopping spree and treat ourselves to something nice.”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Feeling the urge to go on a shopping spree and update my wardrobe!”

27. Burn through cash

This phrase means to spend money rapidly or exhaust one’s financial resources swiftly. It suggests that money is being used up at a fast pace without much consideration or control.

  • For instance, “He burned through cash during his vacation, constantly dining out and splurging on activities.”
  • A person might say, “I need to be careful not to burn through cash too quickly while traveling.”
  • Someone might complain, “Every time I get paid, it feels like I burn through cash within a few days.”
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