Top 24 Slang For Explained – Meaning & Usage

Slang is constantly evolving and keeping up with the latest trends can be a challenge. That’s where we come in! Our team at Fluentslang has put together a comprehensive list that breaks down and explains some of the most popular slang terms in circulation. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to stay in the loop, this list is sure to keep you in the know and ahead of the curve. So, buckle up and get ready to dive into the world of modern slang like never before!

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1. Decoded it

To “decode” something means to analyze and understand its meaning or message. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone has successfully deciphered or made sense of something.

  • For example, if a friend tells you a complicated joke and you understand it, you might say, “I decoded it!”
  • In a conversation about a confusing movie plot, someone might say, “After watching it a second time, I finally decoded it.”
  • A student who figured out a difficult math problem might exclaim, “Yes! I decoded it!”

2. Clarified it

When someone “clarifies” something, they provide additional information or explanation to make it easier to understand. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone has made a confusing or unclear concept more clear.

  • For instance, if someone is explaining a complex topic and you ask for further clarification, you might say, “Can you clarify it for me?”
  • In a discussion about a controversial news article, someone might comment, “The author clarified their stance in a follow-up interview.”
  • A teacher might say to a student, “I’m glad you asked that question. It gave me an opportunity to clarify it for the whole class.”

3. Deconstructed it

To “deconstruct” something means to break it down into its individual parts and examine each part separately. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone has thoroughly analyzed and understood a complex concept or idea.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complicated theory and you understand all the components, you might say, “I deconstructed it in my mind.”
  • In a discussion about a complex artwork, someone might say, “The artist deconstructed the traditional notions of beauty.”
  • A scientist might explain their research process by saying, “First, we deconstructed the problem into smaller, manageable parts.”

4. Elaborated on it

When someone “elaborates” on something, they provide more details or information to enhance understanding. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone has provided additional context or explanation to a concept or idea.

  • For instance, if someone is describing a situation and you want them to provide more information, you might say, “Can you elaborate on it?”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The author elaborated on the protagonist’s backstory in the second chapter.”
  • A presenter might say, “I’ll be brief in my introduction and then elaborate on it during the Q&A session.”

5. Gave the scoop

To “give the scoop” means to provide all the important or juicy details about a particular topic or situation. This slang term is often used to indicate that someone has shared insider information or exclusive knowledge.

  • For example, if a friend tells you about a secret party happening later, they might say, “I’ll give you the scoop.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “I heard from a reliable source who gave me the scoop.”
  • A journalist might write an article titled, “Exclusive Interview: The Actress Gives Us the Scoop on Her New Movie.”

6. Made it easy to understand

This phrase means to explain something in a way that is clear and simple, making it easy for others to comprehend.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I broke down the complex math problem and made it easy to understand.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated topic, someone might say, “Can you please make it easy to understand for those who are not familiar with the subject?”
  • A presenter might start their speech by saying, “I’ll do my best to make this information easy to understand for everyone.”

7. Gave the rundown

To “give the rundown” means to provide a brief summary or explanation of something.

  • For instance, a sports commentator might say, “Before we start the game, let me give you the rundown of the key players.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Can you give us the rundown of the project so far?”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me the rundown of what happened at the party last night?”

8. Put it in black and white

This phrase means to present information or explain something in a clear and straightforward manner, leaving no room for confusion or misunderstanding.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “Let me put it in black and white for you: you are legally obligated to pay the fine.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s financial situation, someone might say, “The numbers put it in black and white – we need to cut costs.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “I’ll put the instructions in black and white so that everyone understands what to do.”

9. Gave the skinny

To “give the skinny” means to provide all the necessary details or information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I interviewed the witness and got the skinny on what really happened.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “I can give you the skinny on the plot without spoiling the ending.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me the skinny on the new restaurant in town? Is it worth trying?”

10. Made it plain as day

This phrase means to explain something in such a way that it becomes completely clear and obvious.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “After going over the lesson again, it should be plain as day.”
  • In a discussion about a complex concept, someone might say, “Let me break it down for you and make it plain as day.”
  • A presenter might use visual aids and say, “With these graphs and charts, I hope to make the data plain as day for everyone to understand.”

11. Clued in

When someone is “clued in,” it means they are aware of or have information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “I’m not sure what’s happening, but I’ll ask my friend who’s clued in.”
  • If someone is explaining a complex concept, they might say, “Let me clue you in on how it works.”
  • In a conversation about a recent news event, someone might say, “I’m not clued in on that story. Can you fill me in?”

12. Gave the deets

When someone “gives the deets,” they are providing all the necessary or interesting details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “She gave me the deets on the party, including the time, location, and dress code.”
  • If someone is sharing a story, they might say, “I’ll give you the deets on what happened last night.”
  • In a conversation about upcoming plans, someone might ask, “Can you give me the deets on the itinerary?”

13. Gave the inside scoop

When someone “gives the inside scoop,” they are sharing information that is not widely known or providing a behind-the-scenes perspective on a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “He gave me the inside scoop on the company’s upcoming product launch.”
  • If someone has access to exclusive information, they might say, “I can give you the inside scoop on what really happened.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might ask, “Do you have the inside scoop on what led to the breakup?”

14. Gave the full story

When someone “gives the full story,” they are providing a comprehensive explanation or account of a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “She gave me the full story on why she decided to change careers.”
  • If someone is recounting an event, they might say, “Let me give you the full story of what happened that night.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial issue, someone might say, “I want to hear both sides of the argument before I can give the full story.”

15. Gave the whole picture

When someone “gives the whole picture,” they are providing all the necessary information or context to understand a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, “He gave me the whole picture of the project, including its goals and challenges.”
  • If someone is explaining a complex concept, they might say, “Let me give you the whole picture so you can understand it better.”
  • In a conversation about a historical event, someone might ask, “Can you give me the whole picture of what led to that decision?”

16. Gave the full rundown

When someone “gives the full rundown,” they provide a complete and detailed explanation or summary of a topic or situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me give you the full rundown on the American Revolution.”
  • In a work meeting, a manager might say, “Can you give the full rundown on the new project?”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me the full rundown on what happened at the party last night?”

17. Gave the complete breakdown

When someone “gives the complete breakdown,” they provide a thorough and detailed analysis or explanation of a topic or situation.

  • For instance, a financial advisor might say, “Let me give you the complete breakdown of your investment options.”
  • In a sports analysis, a commentator might say, “Let’s break down the complete performance of the winning team.”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you give me the complete breakdown of the novel we’re studying?”

18. Gave the comprehensive explanation

When someone “gives the comprehensive explanation,” they provide a thorough and detailed explanation of a topic or situation.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “Let me give you a comprehensive explanation of how the human body works.”
  • In a technology tutorial, an instructor might say, “I will give you a comprehensive explanation of how to use this software.”
  • A parent might ask a teacher, “Can you give me a comprehensive explanation of my child’s progress in school?”

19. Gave the detailed account

When someone “gives the detailed account,” they provide a thorough and precise description or explanation of a topic or situation.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “Let me give you a detailed account of the events leading up to the protest.”
  • In a crime investigation, a detective might say, “We need a detailed account of everything you saw that night.”
  • A traveler might ask a local, “Can you give me a detailed account of the best places to visit in this city?”

20. Made it clear

When someone “makes it clear,” they provide a clear and understandable explanation or clarification of a topic or situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me make it clear how to solve this math problem.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “I want to make it clear what our company’s goals are.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you make it clear why you’re upset with me?”

21. Gave the DL

This phrase means to provide someone with the essential information or details about a specific topic or situation. It is often used when someone wants a quick summary or overview.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Can you give me the DL on what happened at the party last night?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you give me the DL on the new project?”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll give you the DL on how to use this software.”

22. Gave the breakdown

This phrase means to provide a thorough and detailed explanation of something. It is often used when someone wants a step-by-step analysis or understanding of a complex topic.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Let me give you the breakdown of how to solve this math problem.”
  • In a sports discussion, someone might ask, “Can you give me the breakdown of the team’s performance in the last game?”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll give you the breakdown of the new company policy.”

23. Gave the 101

This phrase means to provide someone with the fundamental or introductory information about a particular subject. It is often used when someone wants to learn the basics or get started on a new topic.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Can you give me the 101 on how to play guitar?”
  • In a cooking class, the instructor might say, “Let me give you the 101 on making pasta from scratch.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can you give me the 101 on investing in the stock market?”

24. Gave the download

This phrase means to provide someone with the necessary information or details about a specific topic or situation. It is often used when someone wants to be informed or updated about something.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “Can you give me the download on the upcoming meeting?”
  • In a group project, someone might ask, “Can you give me the download on your part of the assignment?”
  • A friend might say, “Give me the download on what happened while I was away.”
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