Top 39 Slang For Explains – Meaning & Usage

Explaining concepts and ideas can sometimes be a challenge, but fear not! We’ve got your back with a list of slang terms that will make your explanations pop and resonate. From trendy phrases to quirky expressions, this compilation is sure to add a fun twist to your communication style. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your explaining game with our handpicked selection of slang for explains!

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1. Break it down

This phrase is used to request or provide a thorough explanation of a concept or idea.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me break it down for you so you can understand.”
  • In a conversation about complex technology, someone might ask, “Can you break down how this software works?”
  • If someone is struggling to understand a math problem, a friend might say, “I can break it down step by step for you.”

2. Lay it out

This slang phrase means to present information or explain something in a straightforward and easily understandable manner.

  • For instance, a presenter might say, “Let me lay it out for you in simple terms.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated legal case, a lawyer might say, “I’ll lay out the facts of the case for the jury.”
  • If someone is confused about a plan, a friend might say, “I’ll lay it out for you so you know exactly what to do.”

3. Spell it out

To “spell it out” means to explain something in a clear and explicit manner, leaving no room for confusion or misunderstanding.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I need to spell out the expectations for this project.”
  • In a conversation about a complicated recipe, someone might say, “Can you spell out the steps for me?”
  • If someone is not understanding a joke, the comedian might say, “Let me spell it out for you: it’s funny because…”

4. Clue in

This phrase means to provide information or knowledge to someone who is unaware or uninformed about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I’ll clue you in on the latest gossip.”
  • In a discussion about a secret plan, someone might say, “We need to clue everyone in on the details.”
  • If someone is unaware of an important event, a colleague might say, “I’ll clue you in on what’s happening tomorrow.”

5. Fill in

To “fill in” means to provide the necessary or missing information to complete a story, explanation, or understanding of a situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me fill you in on what you missed while you were absent.”
  • In a conversation about a complex topic, someone might say, “Can you fill me in on the details?”
  • If someone is unaware of recent developments, a friend might say, “I’ll fill you in on what’s been happening.”

6. Shed light on

To “shed light on” something means to clarify or provide additional information about a topic or situation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me shed some light on this math problem for you.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “New evidence has shed light on the mystery surrounding the crime.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you shed some light on why you made that decision?”

7. Give the lowdown

To “give the lowdown” means to provide all the necessary information or details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, a tour guide might say, “Before we begin, let me give you the lowdown on the history of this place.”
  • In a conversation about a new gadget, someone might ask, “Can you give me the lowdown on its features and capabilities?”
  • A coworker might say, “I’ll give you the lowdown on the project during our meeting.”

8. Decode

To “decode” something means to decipher or interpret its meaning, especially if it is difficult to understand or hidden.

  • For example, a computer programmer might say, “I need to decode this encrypted message.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might be tasked with decoding a secret message.
  • A friend might ask, “Can you help me decode this text message? I don’t understand what they’re trying to say.”

9. Untangle

To “untangle” something means to unravel or make sense of a complex or confusing situation or problem.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “I need to untangle the web of lies to solve this case.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated issue, someone might say, “Let’s untangle the different factors involved.”
  • A therapist might help a client untangle their emotions and thoughts during a counseling session.

10. Elaborate

To “elaborate” means to provide more details or expand on a topic or idea.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “I will now elaborate on the main points of my presentation.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you elaborate on what you meant by that statement?”
  • A teacher might encourage a student to elaborate on their answer to a question.

11. Simplify

To make something easier to understand or comprehend by breaking it down into simpler terms or concepts.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me simplify this math problem for you.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you simplify the process for submitting expense reports?”
  • A presenter might say, “I’m going to simplify the complex topic of quantum physics in this presentation.”

12. Illustrate

To provide visual or descriptive examples in order to explain or clarify a concept or idea.

  • For instance, a professor might say, “Let me illustrate this concept with a diagram.”
  • A writer might use an analogy to illustrate a point, saying, “Comparing it to a puzzle can help illustrate how all the pieces fit together.”
  • A presenter might use a slideshow to illustrate the key points of their presentation.
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13. Enlighten

To provide knowledge or information that brings understanding or awareness to a particular subject or topic.

  • For example, a mentor might say, “Let me enlighten you on the best practices for career advancement.”
  • A documentary might enlighten viewers about a specific historical event or social issue.
  • A friend might say, “I read this fascinating article that enlightened me about the benefits of meditation.”

14. Clarify

To remove confusion or ambiguity by providing additional information or explanations.

  • For instance, a customer service representative might say, “Allow me to clarify our return policy.”
  • During a debate, a participant might say, “I’d like to clarify my previous statement.”
  • A teacher might clarify a point by saying, “To clarify, the correct answer is option B.”

15. Demystify

To make something less mysterious or perplexing by explaining it in a way that is easy to understand.

  • For example, a scientist might demystify a complex scientific concept by using everyday examples.
  • A journalist might demystify the process of investigative reporting by sharing behind-the-scenes stories.
  • A friend might say, “Let me demystify the world of online dating for you.”

16. Give me the scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the details or information about a particular situation or event.

  • For example, if someone is talking about a party they attended, you might say, “Give me the scoop on what happened.”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, you could ask, “Can you give me the scoop on the plot?”
  • If someone is discussing a recent news story, you might say, “I heard about that, but can you give me the scoop on the latest developments?”

17. Clue me in

This phrase is used to ask someone to share information or knowledge about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, if someone is discussing a secret plan, you might say, “Clue me in on what’s going on.”
  • In a conversation about a complex issue, you could ask, “Can you clue me in on the details?”
  • If someone is talking about a new trend, you might say, “I’m out of the loop, so clue me in on what it’s all about.”

18. Fill me in

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide the latest information or updates about a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a recent meeting, you might say, “Fill me in on what happened.”
  • In a conversation about a new project, you could ask, “Can you fill me in on the details?”
  • If someone is talking about a recent trip, you might say, “I haven’t heard anything, so please fill me in.”

19. Shed some light

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide clarification or additional information that will help to better understand a particular situation or topic.

  • For instance, if someone is discussing a complicated concept, you might say, “Can you shed some light on it?”
  • In a conversation about a mysterious event, you could ask, “Can you shed some light on what really happened?”
  • If someone is talking about a confusing situation, you might say, “I’m not sure I understand, so please shed some light on it.”

20. Tell me what’s up

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide the current status or latest news about a particular situation or topic.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a recent party, you might say, “Tell me what’s up with that.”
  • In a conversation about a new project, you could ask, “Can you tell me what’s up with the timeline?”
  • If someone is talking about a recent trip, you might say, “I haven’t heard anything, so tell me what’s up.”

21. Let me in on it

This phrase is used to request someone to provide information or include them in a conversation or plan. It implies that the person is seeking to be included or informed about something.

  • For example, if a group of friends is discussing a secret plan, someone might say, “Hey, let me in on it. What’s going on?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you let me in on the details of the upcoming project?”
  • If someone is talking about an inside joke, another person might say, “Let me in on it. I want to understand the humor.”

22. Break it to me gently

This phrase is used when someone wants to be informed about something difficult or unpleasant but prefers to hear it in a gentle or sensitive manner.

  • For instance, if someone is about to receive bad news, they might say, “Can you break it to me gently?”
  • When discussing a sensitive topic, someone might request, “Please break it to me gently. I’m not sure how I’ll react.”
  • If someone is hesitant to hear criticism, they might say, “I can handle it, but please break it to me gently.”

23. Give me the 411

This phrase is used to request someone to provide all the necessary details or information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, if someone is discussing an upcoming event, they might ask, “Can you give me the 411 on the schedule?”
  • When talking about a recent news story, someone might say, “I heard about it, but can you give me the 411 on what actually happened?”
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might request, “Give me the 411 on its features and pricing.”

24. Put me in the loop

This phrase is used to express a desire to be included in important conversations, updates, or decisions.

  • For instance, if a team is discussing a project, someone might say, “Put me in the loop. I want to stay informed.”
  • In a family setting, a member might request, “Please put me in the loop regarding any changes in our plans.”
  • If someone feels left out of a group’s activities, they might say, “I want you to put me in the loop. I don’t want to miss out anymore.”

25. Break it down like a kit-kat bar

This phrase is used to request someone to explain a complex or confusing concept in a simplified and easily understandable manner.

  • For example, if someone is struggling to understand a difficult topic, they might say, “Can you break it down like a kit-kat bar for me?”
  • When discussing a complicated process, someone might request, “I’m not getting it. Can you break it down like a kit-kat bar?”
  • If someone is explaining a technical subject, they might say, “Let me break it down like a kit-kat bar so you can understand it better.”

26. Break it down like a champ

This phrase is used to encourage someone to explain something in a clear and concise manner, often with a sense of confidence and expertise.

  • For example, a teacher might say to a student, “Can you break down the steps of solving this math problem like a champ?”
  • In a dance class, an instructor might tell a student, “Now, break it down like a champ and show me your best moves.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might say, “I’m going to break down the key points of this topic like a champ, so everyone can understand.”

27. Break it down like a master

Similar to the previous phrase, this expression is used to encourage someone to explain something in a thorough and expert-like manner.

  • For instance, a mentor might say to a protégé, “You’ve learned a lot, now it’s time to break it down like a master and share your knowledge.”
  • In a cooking class, an instructor might challenge a student, “Can you break down the recipe like a master chef and explain each step?”
  • During a workshop, a facilitator might say, “I’m going to break down this complex concept like a master, so everyone can grasp it.”

28. Fill in the blanks

This phrase is used when someone needs to add missing information or gaps in a story or explanation.

  • For example, a teacher might ask a student, “Can you fill in the blanks and complete the missing steps in this science experiment?”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I have some information, but I need you to fill in the blanks with the rest of the details.”
  • During a meeting, a colleague might ask, “Can you fill in the blanks on the progress of the project?”

29. Make it clear

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for clarity and understanding in an explanation or communication.

  • For instance, a manager might tell their team, “When presenting the report, make it clear and easy to follow.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’m not sure I understand. Can you make it clear for me?”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me make it clear from the start: our goal is to increase sales by 20%.”

30. Give the scoop

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary and interesting details about a particular topic or situation.

  • For example, a journalist might say to a source, “Can you give me the scoop on the latest scandal?”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might ask, “Did you watch it? Give me the scoop!”
  • During a press conference, a reporter might say, “Can you give us the scoop on the new product launch?”

31. Give me the rundown

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide all the necessary information or a summary of a situation or topic. It implies a desire for a comprehensive explanation.

  • For example, if someone is planning a trip, they might say, “Give me the rundown on the best places to visit.”
  • In a work setting, a manager might ask an employee, “Can you give me the rundown on the project’s progress?”
  • A student might ask a classmate, “Can you give me the rundown on what happened in class yesterday?”

32. Break it all down

This phrase is used to ask someone to explain a complex or confusing concept in a way that is easy to understand. It suggests a desire for a step-by-step explanation.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to understand a math problem, they might say, “Can you break it all down for me?”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the instructor might say, “Let’s break down the recipe into simple steps.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you break down the main points of the article you read?”

33. Put me in the picture

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or an explanation that will help the listener have a clear understanding of a situation or topic. It implies a desire to be included or informed.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a current event, they might say, “Put me in the picture. What’s happening?”
  • In a business meeting, a participant might ask, “Can you put me in the picture on the new project?”
  • A friend might ask another friend, “Put me in the picture. Who is that person you were talking to?”

34. Explain the ins and outs

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a thorough explanation of a topic or situation, including all the relevant details and intricacies.

  • For instance, if someone is learning a new hobby, they might say, “Can you explain the ins and outs of this activity?”
  • In a job interview, the interviewer might ask the candidate, “Can you explain the ins and outs of your previous role?”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Can you explain the ins and outs of your school project?”

35. Tell me the story

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide a complete and detailed explanation of a situation or topic. It implies a desire to hear the entire story or narrative.

  • For example, if someone is recounting an event, they might say, “Tell me the whole story. What happened next?”
  • In a history class, the teacher might say, “Tell me the story behind this historical event.”
  • A friend might ask another friend, “Tell me the story of how you and your partner met.”

36. Give me the deets

This phrase is a colloquial way of asking for more information or the specifics of a situation. It is often used in casual conversations or when someone wants to know more about a particular topic.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “Hey, what’s the deets on the party tonight?”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “Can you give me the deets on the new project?”
  • Someone might use this phrase in a text message, saying, “I heard you went on a date last night. Give me the deets!”

37. Let me in on the secret

This phrase is used to express a desire to be included in confidential or exclusive information. It implies that the person wants to be part of something secretive or privy to information that others may not be aware of.

  • For instance, a group of friends might be planning a surprise party, and one friend might say, “Come on, let me in on the secret!”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I need someone to let me in on the secret of the missing diamond.”
  • A person might use this phrase in a playful manner, saying, “I can see you’re hiding something. Let me in on the secret!”

38. Enlighten me

This phrase is used to ask someone to provide information or knowledge on a particular subject. It implies that the person is open to learning and wants to be educated or informed about something.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a complex topic, they might say, “Enlighten me on the details.”
  • In a classroom setting, a student might ask the teacher, “Can you enlighten me on how to solve this math problem?”
  • A person might use this phrase in a conversation, saying, “I’ve never been to that restaurant before. Enlighten me on their menu.”

39. Let me in on the know

This phrase is similar to “let me in on the secret” and is used to express a desire to be included in information or knowledge that others may have. It implies that the person wants to be aware of something that is not widely known.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is discussing a trending topic, one friend might say, “Hey, let me in on the know!”
  • In a business meeting, a colleague might ask, “Can you let me in on the know about the upcoming changes?”
  • A person might use this phrase in a curious manner, saying, “I can tell you’re holding back information. Let me in on the know!”